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Advocate: Sunday, September 27, 1964 - Page 1

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - September 27, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                Arkansas ___ 31 Tulsa 22 Southern Cal 40 Oklahoma Stale 27 SMU 26 3Iinnesola 21 Washington 35 Baylor 27 Mississippi 21 Florida St. 10 TCU Dame 31 Wisconsin 7 LSU 3 Kice Carolina 21 Michigan Si. 15 Spring Biih 26 Kay 3 14 Texas 23 Texas Tech. 24 Air Force 0 Cross 13 6 THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE TELEPHONE HI 5-HSI VICTORIA, TEXAS, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1964 'Sanctuary'Reportedly Ruled Out GM, Union If Red Planes Attack Off Viet Nam Established WASHINGTON (AP) President Johnson report- edly has decided that if Communist planes attack u. S. naval forces operat- ing off Viet Nam, American fighters can chase them across the Red China fron- tier if necessary. The decision to provide more precise authority for 0. S. pilots to apply the principle of "hot pursuit" and deny the Communist privileged sanctuary" re- portedly was prompted by Inc Red Chinese movement of Soviet-biiilt jet warplanes into Communist Viet Nam early in August. The aircraft were intro- duced itilo the area after American planes blasted torpedo boats and other in- stallations in North Viet Nam following attacks on American destroyers in the Tonkin Gulf. The sequence of events in- dicates a slow and cautious escalation of the danger of direct U.S.-Chinese clashes in southeast Asia. This situation is likely to become more tense, and probably much more seri- ous, if deteriorating politi- cal conditions inside South Viet Nam tempt tile Com- munists to exploit the dis- order and political instabil- ity. A buildup of military pres- sures inside South Viet Nam by increased Red guerrilla strikes and parallel external actions could produce a very grave crisis in short order. Cuero Bond Proposition Voted Down DEMANDED From Washington's point of view, however, Ihe South Vietnamese situation is sub- ject to so many unpredicta- ble developments that no one here can say whether the worst possibilities of in- creasing danger are likely to be realized or not. Wha't is said authoritatively is that administration leaders, deeply occupied at home with the American politi- cal campaigns, would like lo do what they can within the limits of U.S. policy to keep the situation as quiet as possible. The Pentagon announced Aug, week after the U.S. retaliation raids that "a number" of oid style, (Soviet MIG15 and MIG 17 fighters had been moved by Red China into North Viet Nam. The Red planes are far slower than the U.S. Navy jet fighters which are capa- able of speeds up lo miles an hour, yet they are fast enough to add a new dimension to hostilities in the narrow air space over lhe Gulf of Tonkin. State and defense depart- ment spokesmen said this svholc subject coincs under what they eal! the "rules of engagement" for U.S. mili- tary forces and is an Ail- Force secret. They said they would not even con- firm the existence of a Johnson authorization for across national frontiers pursuit if necessary in com- bat. CUbRO Two propositions, including one involving issuance of in bonds for new buildings and improvements to existing facilities, feated by a vote were de of nearly Viet Nam Ripe For New Coup Persons Youug military officers Satur- day demanded a purge of six- older generals, and a high gov- tary men. the older mili- voted in favor. A proposition seeking auth- orization for the school district to levy a tax rate not to exceed for maintenance of schools was defeated 910 to 464. Mrs. R. J. Waldeck, an elec- areas and set up barbed wire barricades and gun posilions outside navy and air force in- in the "Cuerolnde- IMSKDislricl clcction Over voters cast ballots. It was believed to be the largest turnout of voters in the history of the school district. The proposition asking for is- suance of in bonds re- ceived (he worst defeat. A lotal of 933 persons voted against thc proposition and 429 He identified the targets of the ultimatum as Lt. Gen. Tran mi; ufifuitudni as Lit (jen Iran o S Sfe Khr- -embernof lhe noops ruling military tnunvirale, and five generals whom the young military officers accuse of fa- stallations Injured in Auto Crash The mother of a tlirce-week- old boy was listed in undeter- b mined condition with a broken decision, collarbone and possible internal injuries Saturday night ing a grinding collision of two cars in the 1400 block of East1 Juan Linn Street. Mrs. Gloria Chavez Trevino 21, of 1G03 E. Santa Rosa St., ui la- ui muu EJ. oania ttosa al vonng the neutralization of Viet one of five persons including Nam, as suggested by France, the infant that were injured in Khanh and Maj. Gen. Duong the crash, was rushed into I vjtu. iyuullli Gen. Nguyen Khanh, [van Minh, the chief ofslate.are premier for nine months, was out of town to deal with a tribal uprising in Die central moun- tains. The spate of military activity in Saigon came after nightfall. Two main roads leading to the navy base on the Saigon water- front _i- i (See COUP, Page 8A) wire were closed by barbed barricades and throe 20mm cannon mounted Marines whisked throuch the city in trucks. Others charBcd ima. j. wainecK, an elec- cannon mounted on lion clerk, said Saturday's volcllnicks guarded each entrance count was thc largest she had j Machine guns were spotted ever seen during the 39 years' alongside the base ami rolls of that she has worked on schoo barbed wire were at various elections. She said as far as locations ready to be strung she knew the vole count was across lhe streets. Iho largest ever recorded In a Cuero school election. The election was certainly one of the most controversia ever held in the district. Included in (he proposed build ing plans were a new junior high school on the Cuero Higl School campus and addiliona' classrooms nnd facilities al Cuero High School needed foi proposed consolidation of Daule High (for Negroes) with Cuero High School. The program also called for consolidalion of the elementary grades, with the exception of (See CUEUO, Page SA) blocked off one entrance to the! joint general staff headquarters. There were reports that other marines had converged at the suburb of Thu Due. The government source said Khanh received the ultimatum before flying to Ban Me Thuot, IfiO miles northeast of Saigon, to The Aron Holies marking wedding anniversary today and Airs, Elizabeth Anderson celebrating a birthday Mrs. Harry and Mrs Dentils S c h c r c r announcing plans for the annual Turkey Supper Oct. 4, at Our Lady of Victory Church, 4 p.m. until. Paintings by Mrs. W. S. s on exhibit .1 to 5 p.m. today at the McN'nmnra O'Con- iry to micll a revolt by commission is convinced, Lain tribesmen who had been beyond doubt, that the rifle trained and equipped by U.S. shols which killed Kennedy nor Museum to -serve hot CWV Auxiliary tnmnles, coffee, cako and pies before and after the masses today at Our Lady of Sorrows Church Mayor Kemper Williams getting credit lor unofficial hut effective sound effects during rehearsals of the Trail Theatre's "Auntie Mnme" Mrs. C! f. o r g e expressing a desire for a vehicle of the camping variety for fnvorile fishing trips Al Wnrthnm, equipped lo stay on the job, but slifl keeping up with friends going by Mrs. C. L. Hillstcln trying to find a way lo add a flower gardening schedule to an already crowded list of Ihings to do Miss Klla Wcnnlcn, senior at Hie University of Houston, and Wcnrdcn, second year sopho more at South Texas College, ilay nnd their son, Low's, birlli- diiy loilny will) family dinner i n .n-vmi UM uig 10 maKe Including the Jim Hcmicls, mid it "sntisfnclory to our Jewish Sirs. Ircnr. La llniivr. and licr brothers." children of San Antonio. -Pope Paul VI, his cardinals Nation Waits For Warren Panel Report WASHINGTON (AP) The nation awaited Saturday the conclusions oil the how and why of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. A seven-man commission Chief Justice Earl Presi- finding and disclosing "the truth as far as it can be rtiscov- in u UCAS. wuiuro were j i MJ guarding the 700 and last Nov. 20 with leading to navy headquarters. Fifteen soldiers in combat dress were on guard inside the main post office. A 50-caliber machine gun and rocket launcher were perched at ;r: cr, ?L uunveren 10 me President tni the gates of lhe military air digest of ils findings a 4-inch IICKJ. knnj. r -i-.. n-- -i field. Troops bivouacked on the lawn of building the premier's and barbed office thick book. Later, (he White House announced that the re- port will be made public Sunday nt p.m. EST. The book is the fruition of the questioning of scores of persons, many on-the-scene studies in Dallas, the examination of of a drive-in grocery store after traveling west on Juan Linn when liis car was in collision with a 1959 model car being driven by Johnson in thc op- posite direction. Thc impact which was to the right side of Trevino's vehicle and the front of Johnson's car knocked Trevino's across a ditch and through a wire fence between two residences. John- L-JII t jonn- scores of reports, photos and son's car came to rest sideways other exhibits nrpnarpH Kv tVio in mirlrtld r.r -i___i other exhibits prepared by the FBI and other police agencies. Will Name Oswald It is expected to tell whether military personnel to fight the Communist Viet Cong. According to this informant, Khanh was undecided on what to do about the ultimatum. It carried n deadline of Oct. 25, two days before Khanh has pledged to restore civilian rule. Gut the informant said a coup could come from either (he young generals, who defemlcdja Dallas night club operator, (See REPOIIT. Page 8A) were fired by Lee Harvey Os- wald, a 24-year-old, unstable ex- Marine and avowed Marxist. And it is expected also to ex- press lhe commission's conclu- sions on whether Oswald acted alone or was a part of some sort of conspiracy. The report is lo cover also (he killing of Oswald by Jack Ruby mi aa iu uiiii mscuv- i ciiiumimi oieve voyn ered" about the tragic events ofisaid Trevino was attempting last Nov. 22-2-1 in Dallas. Delivered to LUJ On Thursday, the commission delivered to the President the Hospital shortly after her rival there. Baby Only Bruised The baby, Robert Joseph Trevino, who was born on Sept. 3, was reported all right after being observed for a facia' aruise. He was not admitted t  get the corporation's para- lyzed car plants back into production. Talks, suspended since Friday) when more limn a quarter-mil-1 lion workers walked out, will) start again al 2 p.m. Sunday.) GM and United Auto Workers' President Walter P. Itcuthcr announced thc scheduled re- sumption in separate state- ments. Both announcements came approximately at noon, or in the 2Cth hour of a UAW strike that closed most of GM's plants from coast to coast. Thc UAW walked out In ils "selective" GM strike at 10 a.m. Friday, the union deadline, after failure of negotiators to agree on a new three-year con- tract. Neither the company nor union elaborated on the state- ments on the resumption of talks. The government hailed the ecision. William Simkin, head of the1 U.S. Mediation and Conciliation] Service, said the government was "encouraged." Simkin, though in Detroit recently, has kept aloof from the negotiations. Both the union and corpora- lion have indicated a preference lo negotiate privately although Reulher, a day before the strike (deadline, had proposed arbitra- tion. General Motors rejected the proposal. 46 Cents Big City Rioting Not Hoover Reports Special Council Session Due Right-of-Way Report City Council will meet In a special called session Mon- day at 5 p.m. to hear a re- port from a special invcsti- galive committee named last week by Mayor Kemper Williams Jr. Williams, who named Hie panel to look into activities of the city's right-of-way agent, called news media Saturday to announce the special meeting Just before ho left the city for the week- end. He dill not indicate whether council is to receive a final report of the commit- tee Monday. Members of the commit- tee itself, Councllwomaii liea Marlin, former Mayor W. It. iUcCrighl ami Atly'. William S. Kly, also were unavail- able for comment Saturday. The city's agent reported- ly has acquired two pieces of properly while negotiating right of way acquisition under ilic bond paving and drainage program. The com- milUe was named to de- termine whclher his actions violated a scclion of the city charier. FOG MOVES IN surgery Citizens MemorialjdeadHnc, proposed arbilra-] SANTA BARBARA, Change in Weather Break for Firefighters the floorboard by the impac which was at a point about 40 'eel east of the Juan Linn-Water Street intersection. Attempting Turn City Patrolman Steve Coynes Considerable cloudiness through Sunday night with scattered showers and thunder- shoivers. Southeast winds 10 to 20 miles per hour. Expected Sunday temperatures: low 71 high 87. in the middle of the street. Batlcry Disconnected The battery in Johnson's car was disconnected after smoke was seen coming from the hood. Trevino, who has been em- ployed for the last three months at De Tar [fospital as an order- ly, suffered cuts on his right elbow and right knee. Johnson, an employe of Safety Steel, sustained a minor cut on us left eye lid and a bruise on us nose. His wife complained of njuries lo her head and left ankle. Trevino said lie was going lo ;he store to buy some ice cream (Sec CRASH, Page 8A> Thc union said its strike had nothing to do with a worker's pay check but was called over working conditions, including production rates. General Motors already had agreed to match the higher pensions and other liberalized fringe benefits granted in prior UAW settlements for more than Foi-d and Chrysler tvork- rs. At the same lime GM said it 'as willing to compare its plant conditions with those of any other manufacturer. WEATHER Calif lifted slightly" Saturday lowering fog retarded Die vora- cious 5-day-old Snla Barbar fire. cent contained early Saturday. No estimate was made on when it would be fully contained. Gov. Edmund G. Brown and Edward A. McDc-rmoll, director of the President's Office of Em- ergency Planning, inspected the disaster area by helicopter to see how much of the devastated area might be eligible for feder- al aid. Key to the hopes of men still struggling on a 20-mile- wide fire line was the weather which look a sharp, favorable turn Friday night. Since the fire began last Tues- day, temperalures in thc upper 80s and 90s and hot, dry winds from inland deserts Califor- nia's legendary "devil winds" kept the fire racing back and llrwni. lU loaded 'with chemical' r'efaT- danls. An additional vehicles rme Corps Air Station near South' Central Texas: Umcs ends of the sprawling fire wore being battled with Hoodlums Blamed for Outbursts Race Issues Not Involved WASHINGTON (AP) FBI Director J, Edgar Hoover said Saturday nine recent riots in (he northern United States were not race riots and were not organ- ized by the Communist parly or any other group. In a 10-page report ordered by President Johnson, Hoover said that while racial tensions were a contributing factor in most, "none of (he nine occurrences was a 'race riot' in the accepted meaning of the phrase. They were not riols of Negroes against whites or whites against Negroes. And they were not a direct outgrowth of conventional civil rights protest." Hoover said "no evidence was found that the riots were organ- ized on a national basis by any 11 helicopters and 10 air tankers or organization." Santa Anna Saturday to joi other Marines, sailors and sol diers fighting the fire. Meanwhile, persons cvacuat ed earlier in the week were returning to their homes in al areas. Many, however, had no homes to return to. The fire, which killed one man and injured 41 others, destroyed 78 homes and major slructures Reds Hulcd Oul He said the Communist Parly i in Uus country "does not appear Marines and to have officially instigated" Toro Ma- July rioting in the Negro areas of New York City "though its members were observed taking part in some, and its former members arc leaders" of groups seeking to exploit Negro unrest. Among (hose groups the re- port mentioned were the Pro- gressive Labor Movement and lhe Labor Vanguard. Johnson responded to one of Hoover's recommendations by U the FBI to make riot erable cloudiness Sunday and Monday with occasional show- ers or thundershowers mainly north. High Sunday 80s. High Saturday, 85; low 72. Precipitation: Saturday .89. Total for year, 30.69. Tides (Port Lavaca Port O'Connor Low Sunday r ov.'e We flrc to lhe Permiter 0 p.m.; high Sunday al m. Baromelric pressure al Santa Barbara. But Friday night a deep fo bank rolled in off the Pacifi and into the steep canyons o the charred Santa Ynez Moun tains behind the city. Ligh drizzles hit the lower slopes, no extinguishing the flames bu area enough to le level: 29.96. Sunset Sunday p.m. Sun- rise Monday a.m. This inlormatiDn bjsed on data .rom Ihe U.S. Weather Bureau Office. (Src Wrariier INDEX SA Editorial 10-IIA ZA Mnvfcf Ftjft FUN oil IIA 1WMJA WINDS OF CHANGE i I-U.V TelcvMtm FUN Tccn Tdj Women's 'jfire fighters work closer to Ih [blaze. sea The fog brought temperature down into the 70s Saturday Humidity rose to 30 to 50 pe cent. Spokesmen termed th weather conditions "very favo rable." "We've thrown a ring ot me around half of the fire's per said u forest servic spokesman. "The fire real! laid down during the night an is just creeping niong the front, where it is not contained." No towns or structures wer threatened by the fire, he said FUN JA SM. n Vatican Announces Major Steps VATICAN CITY (AP) The Roman Catholic Church Satur- Iny took mnjor slops to promote Christian unily nmt racial cqualily. Simultaneously, its Ecumenical Council wns urged :o act decisively against anti- Semitism. Activity in three separate ields damonslrnlcd (ho forces of renewal nl work to open Ro- man Calholk'lsm In fresh con- 'nets with the modern world: John Carmel ..._._ _, muuoisnop .jonn carmel Houston, sending greetings home Heennn of Westminister EIIK- lo friends Mr. ami Mrs. nml, vloo president of the Vntl- Jolm Slllcs marking n 3fflh wed- con's Chi-litlnn Unity Sccrclnr- effort, would he and bishops met in consistory in Iho Apostolic Palace and voted sainthood for 22 African Ne- groes, a canonization demos- trntlng that thc Church recog- nizes no color line. special Vatican mission under Augustin Cardinal Bea, the Pone's (op Christian unity expert, carried (ho hcncl of St. Andrew lo Pntral, Greece, in n geslure of friendship toward Iho Church ot Greece, which still vtews the Church ot Rome with suspicion. nmle lo stronulhcn n council Icclnrntlnn on (lie Jews lo make For Pope Paul VI, who car- ried forward the renewal pro- gram slarted by John XXff the events made it a memorable day his C7th birthday. Yellow and while papal flags flying from Vatican buildings gave this tiny city-slate a feslivc air. The winds of change were Today's Chuckle Arclitlccl ut ullrn-inoilcrn church In minister: "Know wlial would he nice? Iliickd tunily "of declaring our abhor- rence of this Ircalmenl and of condemning anli-Semitism anil nil racial and religious intoler- ance." Archbisho Herman noled that lhe declaration on Jews, when originally introduced in the council n year ago, said it would -.._ nnu YCiir ago, II WOUIU clearly blowing, hut Archbishop be unjust lo consider Iho Jews n, o Christ's day or pi lhe present lleonnn's remarks, nl a news conference, reflected the resist- Ihe created controver- sy, but he snld it could not be Ignored. "Millions of Jews during this cciilury have been lorlured nnd put lo dealli (or reasons of rnce or he snld. Therefore, he added, tlic council should take lhe oppor n tieicldc (God-killing) people because of the crucifixion, The Earlier reports indicated th s spreading inlo Vcntu ra County, as well as threat ening the small towns of Oja and Malilija, but the weather -hift stemmed the tide of flame The two main hot spots ac the northeast and northwes Group Seeks Rockporl Bank AUSTIN application or a new slate bank al Hock- porl, Aransas County, has been received by the Banking De- partment, Commissioner J. M, 'alkncr snid Saturday. The proposed Bank of Rock- has been e as een changed lo warn against imput- ing Die Jews of our time Dint which was perpetrated In Iho passion of Christ. "I understand why the Jews fee) he went on, "To have removed Iho ref- erence absolving thc Jewish (See VATICAN, Page (A) porl Mould have capital of 000, surplus of and re- serves of E. P. Mi.von of Nordhelm and Rockporl Is projected as a di- rector and president. Other pro- posed directors arc C. J. Kehoc, Houston; Floyd Rouquclte, Fut- ton; fl. c. Piltmim, Victoria, nnd Russell Itschnov, Thomas Rogers and Fred Uracht Jr., all of Rockport. estimated S3.5 million in dam- age lo property improvements alone. The watershed lost was price- :ss. Many of the burned homes were mansions In Ihe Santa Barbara suburb of Montecito, a favorite summer-home commu- nity of millionaires. Avery Brundage, president of lhe International Olympic Com- mittee, lost his 20-room man- sion. Dr. Robert Maynard Ilutehins, president of the Cen- ter for the Study of Democratic Institutions, tost his home and library. Residents of Santa Barbara had watched the fire surround 
                            

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