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Advocate: Saturday, September 19, 1964 - Page 1

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - September 19, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                Victoria.....34 Highlands 0 Goliacl......14 Kariies City 13 Industrial 28 Bloommgton 0 O Rosenberg 28 Gross....... 0 Cuero 12 Edua....... 7 Yoakum 37 Yorklowii 6 Ganado.....18 Louise...... 0 HalleltsviHc 9 Weimar..... 0 Gonzales Calhouii 15 0 San Anffelo 18 Kay 0 Miller Alamo 29 14 Garland 44 Samuel 6 Palacios 27 Tidehaveii 0 Arlington Hts 27 McCaUnin 7 Refugio.....19 Beeville.....16 Carroll 27 Spring Wood 14 THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 135 Pacts OKTd At Chrysler, Ford Plants CMC Next Goal Of Auto Union DETROIT (AP) Last iniinile labor contract settle- ments Friday averted slrikes al two automotive 6iants, For arUi orbit nights would be 1966. The firing of the 570-ton giant Jne iirmg 01 me aiu-ion giani security commission ended the series lo qualify (he 0 compati- Busier ana spacecrau compati- held as a prelude to Us bility. The next Uiree launches convention. of lhe million rocket wjn Earlier, another speaker had carry large meteoroid detec- ,IH cornrnjssion ion Pegasus to evidence on small space (Sec CftAPT, Page 3) a visiting lecturer at Cambridge University in England. Dobie was an outspoken critic and the center of many contro- man's he once said. versies. He once advised the Univer- a grain elevator. Dobie championed Dr. Homer P. Hainey, who was fired as University of Texas president in 1944 after several years of; No Damage Reported to U.S. Ships Quarry Flees In Darkness WASHINGTON (AP) Two U.S. destroyers were engaged in action in the Gulf of Tonkin off North Viet Nam Friday, both Washington and Communist North Viet Nam reported. The destroyers patrolling the gulf were reported to opened fire on what have they thought were North Vietnamese torpedo boats. The destroyers did not say up a juu i-jti auei beverai years 01 iiiu utfairoyers OIQ not Say a clashes with regents over policy I they were fired on themselves, iani.il in owum Texas to a 11 e rs, including academ- according to authoritative a profession of writing and talk- ic freedom, D o b i e supported sources here. U12 annul Inrp nf anH in in nn ing about the lore of Texas and the Southwest, He became an English profes- Rainey in an unsuccessful race for Texas governor. The regents fired Dobie in an iijiynt.il piuitjb- 1 lie IirCQ UOD1C m sor at the University of Texas) 1947 after failing lo persuade and during World War II he wasl (Sec DOBtli, Page 3) Heat Overcomes Ten With Band fulttvaiLtiuic- ciilclgtliuy VellJ1" A. J. (Sonny) Dentler of 2503 cles including five ambulances N. E. Cardinaj St., lhe foreman were pressed into service lo of a line distribution crew, was take the students to Citizens Suicide Ruled reported in good condition Fri- day night at Hohf Clinic and Hospital where he was taken 3y a Duckett ambulance. Dentler luckily was struck only a glancing blow by lhe 'ransformer which fell about 15 :o 20 feet from a point where it had become entangled with a rope on a calhcad, a winch device. A company spokesman told that Bender's crew was replacing a 276-pound transfor- mer when the entanglement oc- curred. He said Dentler was standing on the ground while instructions when the transformer jerked loose and plunged downward. The accident occurred at p.m. behind a residence locat- ed at 201 S. Crescent Drive. Successful Interception Of Satellites Disclosed Complaint Due To Be Filed flihocalt Service GOLIAD Due lo lhe ab- sence of County Alty. Marion Lewis, no charges were filed here Friday against two men suspcelcd of illegally possess- ing marijuana. A sheriff's office spokesman said Lewis was still in Austin WASHINGTON (AP) The McNamara said, however, United Stales has made several that both are highly classified successful practice intercepts and "I'm under serious restric- conference. However, he is ex- lo accept complaints (rom Sher- Iff F. B. Byrne. lwo suspects. One is from Vic- the other from Kan- nays are noieu ann wm oiuui aum i Mrs. John Blinchl marking 1ln- are he'd In one yesterday Klmo Estes "ad County Jail._________ loo busy for anything but a brief visit Gary McCr.ckcn INDEX ringing up a sale by mis-___ _______ lake and eorrecllnc It 'to 60 Mlff of'Se'nw ITdllo 1 Gotrr. 7 Mirktli of U.S. satellites hundreds of miles above the earth with Iwo antimissile systems, Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNama- ra disclosed Friday. He also said that new radar, hich can peer around the earth's curve, will permit dclcc- tion of missiles within seconds of launch several thousand miles away and will "close to double" Uio old 15-minute warn- ing time. McNamara described the over-lhe-horizon radar as "one of the most dramatic" new de- velopments. He said it involves bouncing signals off the iono- sphere in contrast lo lhe old line-of-sight radar that reached only to the horizon. The farther-reaching radar can detect both missiles and aircraft, McNamara said. And he Indicated II may pcrmll ellm Inating some extensions of the Distant Early Warning line such as radar picket ships. The defense chief held a news conference to give some details of lhe new radnr and lhe ......j Hie Inlerccplion systems men- i tinned briefly by President "i In his speech at Sacrs- Imonlo, Thursday. tion" as to what details could be revealed. He expressed belief that the United States is ahead of Rus- sia in both developments but WEATHER Partly cloudy to cloudy with daytime showers through Sat- urday night. South easterly winds at 5 to 15 m.p.h. Expect- ed Saturday temperatures: High 01, low 73. South Central Texas: Cloudy to partly cloudy Saturday through Sunday with showers and thundcrshowcrs Sunday and along the coasl Saturday. IliRh Saturday 88-08. Friday temperatures: High 88, low 71. Precipitation Friday: Twee. Tides (Port Lavaca Port O'Connor Lows al added lhat judging by history the Soviels can be expected lo have them in lhe ne.xt five to seven years. He identified the anlisalcllite weapons as lhe Air Force's Thbr missile and lhe Army's Nike-Zeus antimissile device. Both, McNamara said, are de- velopments of projects lhat have been under way for years. They were started during lhe Eisenhower Administration. The Army successfully inter copied its first satellite on Aug. 1, J963, and the Air Force on May 29, 1964, McNsmnra said. He said this was one year after they wcre ordered to start work on (he onlisalcllilcs. "The Iwo systems have been effectively tested and have in- tercepted salellilcs In space, their missiles passing so close as lo be within the destruction radius of Ihe Mc- Namara said. Ho said this was j Lonnor uivnj. tu i.m. and p.m. Highs at n m Saturrtav imd 3-ss dered to work p.m. Saturday and a.m. Sunday. Barometric pressure at sea level: 29.89. Sunset Saturday: Sim- rise Sunday: Thtx Inlornulion baled on (rom the U.S. Weather Bureau VtclorU satellites. on the anti The two systems been effectively tested and have In- tercepted salelliles in splice, their missiles passing so close as lo be within tha destruction INTERCEPTS, Page 3) At least ten members of the Highlands High School of San Antonio pep squad and band were overcome by whal was reported to be heat exhaustion Friday nighl during Uie second half of the school's football game wilh Victoria at Palti All available emergency vehi- In Shotgun Death Case Following a week-long inves- rum uancr, tigation, Justice of the Peaccithy Cra'g and Teresa Sorrells. Alfred C. Haass rnteri FHHav Siv- Memorial, De Tar and Vic- toria Hospital. One of several Victoria slu- dcnls who assisted emergency workers had to be treated a't De Tar after he had carried one of the San Antonio students in- to the hospital. He passed out after taking the girl inlo the emergency room, a hospital spokesman said. A member of (Jie Highlands faculty said heavy wool long- sleeve uniforms worn by the students apparently caused the Neat exhaustion. They had per- formed on the field at halftime. All of Uie students were re- leased after treatment. Six of them were identified as Jay Finger, Linda Kritte, Carol Carver, Pam Carter, Ca Alfred C. Baass ruled Friday lhat a shotgun blast that proved fatal to Robert V. Schroeder of Airline Road was ap- parently self-inflicled, "Dealh due to a gunshot wound in the chest apparently was Baass' ver- dict. City police had launched an extensive investigation inlo the incident. The probe was com- pleted Thursday night with the resulting information handed over to Baass Friday morning. Schroeder, a 21-year-old em- ploye of Spears Well Service, had been despondent over the Aug. 1 dealh of a six-month- old baby who fell viclim to leukemia, police said. His nude body was found in a bed at the Schroeder apart- Six students were taken to Citizens, three to De Tar and one to Victoria. Today's Chuckle Small boy al piano to his mollicr: "Gee, Mommy, I wish you hadn't been de- prived of so many things as a child." 'Heavy Explosions' A statement by the North Viet Nam foreign ministry said two U.S. destroyers were in action in Uie gulf near a place called Nghe An. The statement, broad- cast by Red China's New China News Agency spoke of "heavy explosions and flashes of light and aircraft circling over the spot." In its own report, the China News Agency said two U.S. warships were active in the area at 2200 hours Friday (10 a.m. Eastern Standard Time) and at daybreak Saturday. This suggested (he possibility of a second incident, but there was no other word on it. Denies Provocalior. The North Vietnamese did not mention North Vietnamese units involved. They denied they had provoked the incident, as they did in last month's Tonkin Gulf isis. The statement said that the memory of a similar incident on Aug. 4 was still fresh and add- ed, "These actions on the U.S. government are extremely seri- The Pentagon, While House and State Deparlmcnl refused any information, beyond a statement by Secretary of De- fense Robert S. McNamara that 1 preliminary and fragmentary reports have been received of a nighttime incident in interna- lional waters in the Gulf of Tonkin." McNamara's bu'ef statement raid, "There has been no dam- age reported by American ves- sels and no loss of American personnel." JfeiYamara said reports of lhe incident were being investigat- ed, and "we will have nothing (See TONKIN, Page 3) AMOUR RISK Zoo Officials Ponder Giant Panda Problem MOSCOW (AP) The Mos-iPark said Wednesday e os-iar sa Wednesday it is ment last Saturday morning, cow Zoo is afraid its widower'prepnred lo negotiate with The body was lying on its left giant panda and a London Zoo's: Moscow to mate the pandas side with (he shotu tsin uvjujr IJMIE VII IIS 1U111 jjl UIH jJUmlil iinfl 3 LODnOn S side with (he shotgun lyinglspinster might fight instead of crossways at the foot of the! falling in love, bed. One shell in the double-i This fear blocked an Barrel shotgun had been GPiUGCJ, j Mt.i Funeral services were held Friday. in Yoakum Monday. I Zoo kcsmi n it fnr v, be SUNDAY PREVIEW All for Teen-Agers A new a special page fur Iccn-aRm (his Sunday in the main news section. The page will feature news of teen-agers, (heir school activities, pictures, cartoons and other stories. Watrh for it on Sundays. Lute Oil Industry News The second installment of a new oil anil gas column will appear In Sunday's Victoria Advocate with the latest news of discoveries, new locations, dry holes, current ex- plorations and other Hems of Interest from the petroleum industry of Victoria and surrounding counties. Fall Garden Planting Feature Advocate garden columnist Doris Ann Kids reports Its Ume to plant (or fall in her weekly column in Sunday's Fun magailitc section. Look for her lips on what lo plant to add color lo your yard. in London's Regents spokesman said the mating would have to he in Moscow because the Soviet panda is "exceptionally rare and worth millions of rubles" and so would not be allowed to travel. Besides, the zoo is not sure its panda would be interested in female companionship, the spokesman said. Other sources said the Re- fictils Park Zoo first tried to make a match last spring. Moscow Zoo said it was a nice idea in principle but there wcre practical difficulties. Pandas come from western China and have been kept la captivity for only about 30 years. There has been little experience In breeding the giant variety. The Peking Zoo succeeded and last December n cub was norn. But Moscow Zoo officials scared their panda and London's might go for each oU OFFICIALS, Paj. t   

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