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Advocate Newspaper Archive: September 14, 1964 - Page 1

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Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - September 14, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 130 TELEPHONE HI J.H51 VICTORIA, TEXAS, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1964 Established IMS 14 Cents Khanh Back in Control With Support of U.S. TU11NS CU2KK Democralic vice presidential nominee Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey makes a cash sale in the Humphrey Drug Store in Huron, S. D. Humphrey, on the campaign trail, slopped for a visit to the family store where he also filled a prescrip- tion, as he is a registered pharmacist. Humphrey is waiting on Mrs. Robert Lindblacl, of Wolsey, S. D. (See re- lated story on Page 5.) (AP Photo) Schulenburg Chief Is Shot by Speeder SCHULENBURG, Tex. Schulenburg's newly appointed police chief was shot four times early Sunday after he and a highway patrolman tried to ar- rest a speeder. Chief Allen Johnson, 25, fath- iJohnson and Wilkerson attempt- dilion in a Houston hospital afl- od to question Svellick after his ear sped through the intersec- tion of U. S. 77 and 90. Svetlick ran into his mother's frame house and as officers ap- proached the porch the man er of three and this ou( firing a Snub.no3ed .22 caliber pistol, Officers were lalion town's only remained in serious condition after an operation at a hospital in nearby Weimar. Rudy Svetlick, 24, was shot once in the neck with a .38 cali- ber bullet fired from the revol- ver of li _ Wilkerpon, also 24. immediately return the fire for fear of striking Svet- lick's wife and other women and children standing nearby. Johnson, who had been at m Svetlick later under- went surgery and removal of his The brief but explosive gun- left kidney at the Weimar hos- figbl occurred about 1 a.m. afterlpital. Svetliek was in a fair con- il tired trotn the rcvol- tempting to disarm ighway patrolman he was shot, la er a neck operation. Johnson was struck once in each shoulder, the right hand and once in the lower left side of his stomach. Svclliek, himself the father of one child and whose wife is expecting another baby, under- went surgery at the Houston hospital where he was said to be in a critical condition Sheriff T. J. Floumoy of Fay- ette County said Svetlick had been drinking but apparently had no motive in the shooting. Flournoy said charges would the police chief and the assail- ant were better determined. Psstt! It Was 1824 There isn't much iloubt about OHO teacher's home- work assignment (ii'cr (lie weekend. Tlic general subject was Victoria and the basic ques- tion was: When was Victoria founded? The answer for the one or two who didn't call Tlic Ail- vocntc: In ISM liy Don Martin DcLcnn, a Mexican colonizer, who f o u n d c il Guailaliipc Victoria with -11 families. Anil, tiUliuiijth few stu- dents realized it, Ilic answer was in a "reference" book in nearly every home the telephone directory, Page 40-Miniite Gun Battle Rages at Berlin Wall BERLIN (AP) West Berlin! refugee never would have police and East German border guards fought a gun battle at dawn Sunday and a 22- year-old American soldier saved Ihe life of a refugee. There were no deaths, but Uiej refugee and possibly an East1 Grman guard were wounded by bullets. Witnesses said they saw an East German guard carried away on a strctcher.A West Berlin woman and a man were injured by flying glass and splinters as submachine gun fire from the east hit West Berlin apartments. U.S. officials said their ro- I ports indicated members of an SHOWS UP LBJ Okays Statement Dora Heads Seaward, Of Backinff Coastal Areas Flooded Officials Voice Deep Concern WASHINGTON (AP) The United Stales threw ils support Behind South Viet Nam's Gen. Nguyen Khanh in an evident effort to bolster his position after Sunday's short-lived coup against him. In an unusual statement issues with President Johnson's approval the Slate Department declared that Khanh conlinucs :o operate "as prime minister" of the "duly constituted govern- ment" in Saigon. Kharh was reported safe. The State Department said Ihe United Stales deplored "any effort to interfere" with what il said was the Khanh regime's program lo revamp South Viet government lo bring in broader participation by the people. Met With .Johnsor.' met HATTEIUS, N. C. (AP) Tropical storm Dora swirled northeast into Hie Allanlic Sunday right, away from all land areas, after leaving a wide swath of coastal area flooded from heavy rains and high wind. At 10 p.m. CST, Dora was located by the Weather Bureau as 180 miles east of Norfolk, Va., moving northeastward into the open ocean where she might regain hurricane at 30 m.p.h. Her highest winds at that time were GO miles an hour and if she continued in the same direction "she will pose no threat to any part of the East the Weather Bureau at Norfolk said. Meanwhile, (wo other storms churned in opposite ends of the Atlantic. Hurricane Ethel was about 400 miles south of Sable Island, Nova Scolia, moving to the northeast and away from North America. Another tropical storm Gladys was located about miles east-southeast of San Juan, Puerto Rico. It was moving west-northwest packing 70 mph winds. The Weather Bureau said it did not represent a threat to any land area during the next 24 hours. In her swipe earlier Sunday at Attempted Coup Seen As Fizzle All Friends Once Again SAIGON, Smith Vic! An attempt to Nam over- the North Carolina and Virginia coasts, Dora had taker> one life, bringing the toll since she first began her assault in Florida last week to seven. At Kilt Devil Hills, wind up to 50 mpli were reported and full lidcs went over Uie highway in some sections. Water was over the roads on Hatleras Island, and emergency shelters were opened on Iliis promontory battered countless limes by storms. Up tlie coast at Norfolk, Va., there was extensive flooding in low-lying streels including those in the City Hall area (See DOHA, Page 71 Advisers with his top Youth Held In Shooting Of City Man A 21-year-old Victoria man was shot in the chest at a.m. Sunday with a .22 caliber rifle at 406'A W. Murray St. and police were holding a 17- year-old youth in the case. Wounded was Domingo Torres Garcia of 1102 S. DeLeon, who was reported in a satisfactory condition Sunday night by the attending physician. Charges are due to be filed again the 17 year old Monday. Garcia is being treated for the wound, inflicted by a rifle with most of its barrel sawed .._ off, at Citizens Memorial Hos- of the South Vietnamese Air pital. His physician described Force, navy and marines and advisers at the White House during the day to go over dis- patches from Saigon. High officials privately voiced dis- may and deep concern over the upheaval in Saigon amidst the big U.S.-backed campaign to wipe out Red guerrillas. Khanh has had support of U.S. policy makers right along dur- ing the past three weeks of political turmoil, and they be filed after the conditions of believed he could still make a comeback despite Sunday's power grab by rival Brig. Gee. Lam Van Phal. Phae was reported to have entered Saigon with about to troops. U.S. authorities figured that Khanh actually had the backing of much larger elements of the army, plus that reached Uie wosl." The witnesses said a tall, blond American military police- man, later identified as Pfc. Hans Puhl, 22, of East Wey- mouth, Mass., climbed atop the concrete wall while the Reds were firing. "Two East Germans had already reached (he refugee. One was pulling at him and the other one pointed his pistol at the a woman re- ported. "The American pulled his own pistol from (he holster, aimed at the East German and said in German: 'Drop him and get away from here." the two other triumvirate mem- bers. Support Lacking jAmerican patrol at the scene I (Hliiy s (..liiicUlc ]east (jiree Washington officials contend- ed that the Phat coup did not have wide support and was going under. In (his context, the U.S. public statement Sunday was designed apparently to help Khanh move back irXo control hopefully without violence. The Slate Department had voiced hope that consultations among the South Vietnamese leaders would quickly allow a return to "normal" in the trou- bled country. "The triumvirate of Gen .Sign Hillside newly painted More front: "Wei Inner oh, watch out for Ilic TAINT." witnesses said they saw Ameri- cans firing at the East Ger- mans. "If il had not been for the one said, "the The U.S. Army said Puhl Khanh, GeiT'. Duong Van a German who had immigrated Minh and Gen. Tran Van Khiem continues to operate with Gen STA TK CON VKA'TIONS Unity To Get Emphasis At Political Meetings o lo Ihe United Stales. The woman said the East Khanh as prime minister Vnd German obeyed Puhl and ranJGen. Mirii exercising the func- (See LBJ, Pagi "The American was a rcalj hero lo sit up there on the wall under she said. "I even heard a West Berlin policeman say lo the American: 'Hans, get down, you also have only one life'. But the American stayed there until Ihe refugee dragged! himself lo Ihe wall." While Puhl was at the wall, (West Berlin police were firing jcarbins from windows of eacl of the shooting, was removed to Garcia as lucky, in that the chest area wound could have proven fatal, Garcia was sitting on the front steps of the home of his estranged wife, Genevieve, 18, at the time Afler Garcia the hospital by Duckell ambu- lance, Mrs. Garcia voluntarily went to the police station and gave officers information con- cerning the circumstances of the shooting Police indicated that Garcia and his wife have been sep- araled for several monlhs. INDEX Abby AslrolOfiy Classified Crossword Dcalhs 14 Edilorial 2 fiotcn 1M3 Movit) e Sports ]0 Television 7 Women's Ry TUK ASSOUMI'.I) I'Kr.SS Texas Democrats and Repub- licans start gathering Monday their slate conventions and Ihe emphasis is expected to be on declarations of unily and praise for Ilicir presidential and vice- presidenlal nominees. The conventions do nol gel in- to full swing until Tuesday but Hie Democrats, meeting in Dal- las, are expected [o have Democratic credentials subcom- mittee Monday. During the first slate conven- tion June 16 in Houston, so-call- ed liberal delegations were seat- ed from Harris, Hnlchinson and Randall counties while conser- vatives were seated from Dallas and Bcxar counties. floor of a four-story apartment house. Wesl Berlin police said laler the East German guards fired more than 100 shots and at least 28 hit West Berlin buildings, West Berlin police fired (14 shols from carbines, headquarters said. When the East Germans busy day Monday as the crc-jsen. Rtilpli Varborough and the' so-called concrvativc Gov. John Connally. Al the Houston convention, Connally won unrtls-l puled control wilh ,1 to In early maneuvering for con- stopped their fire, !wo West trol of Ihe state party, most oflBerlin policemen and a civilian the so-called liberals supported cut the barbed wire atop the donlials subcommittee begins hearing arguments from con- testing delegations. The Republicans, gathering in Austin, are expecting little fire- works at (heir pro-convention sessions Monday. The highlight of the GOP convention will be Ilic address Tuesday of ficp. William Miller of New York, the vice-prcsidenlial Republican nominee. Conle.slinj; delegallnns from llcxnr, Dallns, Udwiirds, Harris, Hulchinsnn, Rnndall and Sher- man counties are due to nppcnr for the second time before Ihe vole. The Democrats have sched- iilctl a battle of dinners Monday night. Several thousand are ex- pected at a dinner honoring Connally at Ihe Dallas Trade Mart while an equal num. her arc expected lo Rather nl a dinner nl a clown-, lown Dallas hold lo fete Yarlro- rough. Al Austin Ihe GOP state exe- (See UNITY, Page 7) wall. The U.S. soldier threw a rope lo Ihe wounded refugee, identified as Michael Meyer, 21. The refugee tied I h e rope (Sco rage 7) Registration Sol For Niglil School Regislrnlinn nl Victoria Col- lege for night classes will he from 7 lo   collapsed Monday. Twenty-four hours after rebel brccs marched into Saigon Sunday morning, lop rebel and oyalist leaders gave a news conference to say they were all 'riends once again and that unity had been restored. Not a shol was fired and there were no casualties reported any where during tho 24 hours, despite threatening thrusts by armored personnel carriers of he rebels and loyalist dive jombers making dry runs over rebel targets throughout the night. No Arresls Due Air Force Commander Nguy- en C'ao Ky who bested Uie rebels by holding Saigon's military airport and refusing lo Dudge announced at the news conference that none of the coup leaders would be arrested. All would be returned to their military duties, Ky said. Seated wilh Ky was the man who had come close lo over- throwing the government, Brig. Gen, Duong Van Due, comman- der of the Vietnamese Army's IV Corps. Ky told newsmen thai Khanh slill controlled Ihe government, that the government was "ex- actly as before the and that it would carry through on its plans to convene a supreme national council to reorganize the government's structure and broaden its base of support among the people. Airport Keopencd Afler planes commanded by air force chief Nguyen Cao Ky buzzed rebel points In an air forces show of strength, the gov- ernment moved three airborne battalions into the city and the rebel troops pulled out of the key places they had taken over. The government station an- nounced that Khanh's caretaker regime was still supreme in the land. Saigon airport reopened to in- ternational traffic and the cable office key barometer of sta- bility resumed operations. Khanh returned to Saigon Sunday night from Dalat, 140 irtbeast of here, where he had fled urder protection of air force, which air attacks on the the loyal threatened rebels. The U.S. State Department declared in Washington that Khanh continues to operate as prime minister and that the (See COUP, Page 7) in Southwest Texas. He was ji rr TO a flight from Houston to Uvalde. V 31 JL HttdUH O Five-year-old Donald Wayne Hovel died in a Corpus Christi hospital Sunday of injuries suf- fered Saturday in Harlingen, when he rode his bicycle into Ihe path of a car. Herbert Mann, 39, of San An- lopio missed a curve while rid- ing a motorcycle Sunday near Laredo and was dead on arrival at a hospital. However, an Aberdeen bakery has promised the quints a huge cake. The quietness of Monday's! Charles Davis, 23, was shot in party is a study in contrast with rrrwr- the fanfare that greeled the' WlLA .1 HJL. quinls a year ago. Mrs. Fischer, Ihen 30 and Uiej Clear to partly cloudy, and n mother of five children, doubled her family in 90 minules. Newspaper photogranhers reporters thronged ar.rt the wailing rooms at SI. Luke's people among whom the Fisch- llospilal and a temporary news- ers have lived will share in thejroom was set up in the hospital birthday. There will be no banners, no parade, no speeches. Thus far the Fischer family has encouraged jio formal cele- bration and the quints presum- ably will have n quiet family parly. The reason apparenlly is Dial Mrs. Fischer is expecting at least one new arrival (o the family of 10 children. Humors set the delivery dale anywhere from a few days up lo Iwo weeks. basement to keep the world informed of Ihe quints' pro- partly cloudy Monday and Tues- day. A little warmer Tuesday. Sunday temperatures: Low grcss Andy Fischer, then an a week shipping clerk at a whole- sale groi'ery house, and Mary Ann, an unobtrusive housewife who likes lo bowl, were thrust into the world spotlight, A law firm shortly was on- tfngert to protect whnl suddenly had become national properly the Fischer faintly and the Fischers retired behind a bar- (See QUINTS, 7) little warmer through Tuesday. Easterly winds 5 to 15 m.p.h. Monday and Monday night, be- coming south-easterly 8 lo 18 m.p.h. Tuesday. Expected Mon- day temperatures: Low 66, high 90. South Central Texas: Clear to 65, high 87. Tides (Port Lavaca Port O'Connor Low at -fMO p.m., high at a.m. Tues- day. Borometric pressure at sen level: 20.97. Sunset Monday sunrise Tuesday This inlminalion bjied on data from the U.S. Weather Bureau Vlclorln Office. (See 7) Ecumenical Warning Sounded by Pope Paul VATICAN CITY (AP) Pope session, which ended lasl Dec. Paul V! warned Sunday, on the 4. Many Jewish leaders and eve of the resumption of the some non-Jewish circles outside aa Vatican against some dreams" that its work ofjoriginal document presented to renewal would be felt immedi-lthe council last year. Ecumenical Council, the council have viewed the new some fantasies and version as a retreat from the alely. His words, to a crowd of 000 in SI. Peter's Square, year. About prelates cardi- nals, patriarchs, archbishops, bishops and abbots from around amounted lo a plea for world are expected at the hope and an understanding that "things in the kingdom of God usually come slowly and silent- ly." The pontiff spoke of no speci- fic matter. But one item on the council's agenda for the session opening Monday has already stirred some disappointment outside the council. It is a draft statement on relalions between Roman Catholics and Jews. Even as Pope Paul spoke, Vatican sources predicted Ihe controversial document on Catholic-Jewish relations would he revised when the assembly lakes il up. H was rewritten during the recess after (ho council's secondi council's third session. Many were in Uie SI. Peter's crowd as Pope Paul appeared at his studio window to give his usual Sunday blessing, [fe asked for prayers for the council and said it should raise hopes "in our souls." "This event (the council) has aroused greal hopes and has also stirred some fantasies and some dreams as if its fruit might be brought forth immedi- ately." (lie Pope said. "ThinRs in the kingdom of God always come slowly and silently. This, however, does not mcnn that we must nol hope for much. We must pray very (Sec POPE, Page 7) City-Wide Dollar Days Today and Tuesday   

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