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Advocate Newspaper Archive: September 13, 1964 - Page 1

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Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - September 13, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 15 119th 129 TELEPHONE HI S-H51 Bonn Ired By Soviet Gas Attack Reich Expert Was Target BONN, Germany (AP) west Germany charged Satur- day that Soviet agents attacked with poison gas a communica- tions expert at (he West Ger- man Embassy in Moscow after he discovered secret micro- phones in (he building. A formal protest, delivered by Foreign Minister Gerhard Schroeder to Soviet Ambassador Andrei Smirnov Friday, de- manded a "thorough investiga- tion" of the incident. The Ger- mans said it took place Sepl. 6 during church services at the ancient Zagorsk monastery, 40 miles northwest of Moscow. The victim was Horst Schwirkmann, a technician, who had been scheduled to end his Moscow lour of duly two days later. The poison gas diagnosis was made by U.S. Army Capt. James Street, a doctor at (he U.S. Embassy in Moscow. Flown Home Aflor Soviet-imposed delays in leaving, Schwirkmann was flown home and was described as being in critical condition in a West German hospital. Although the official protest did not mention the microphone angle, this was disclosed to newsmen by authoritative government sources. Government sources said the attack might have an adverse effect on preparations for a visit here this winter by Soviet Pre- mier Khrushchev. Erliard Bares Plot The news was first broken by Chancellor Ludwig Erhard who told parliamentary leaders about il. Persons present said Erhard called il a "mysterious Soviet intelligence plot." Fragmenlary accounts began lo appear in West German newspapers before the Foreign VICTORIA, TEXAS, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1964 48 Pages Saturday night: FLOODED FLOKIDA of the thousands of small farms in northern Florida flooded out by more than 11 inches of rain is pictured, even as Dora threatened lo become a hurri- cane again and continued to lash Florida and Georgia areas with wind and rain. (AP Photo) Dora Re-Forming, Lashes Out Again SAVANNAH, Dora whipped Ga. (AP) Some major nor'h Florida herself into a tropical storm over the farm- lands of central Georgia Satur- day and threatened to become a hurricane once again as she plowed toward the life-givirg Atlantic Ocean. After disinlegraling into little more than a band of squalls during a Iwo-day rainy trek- across northern Florida, Ala- Ministry releases this account bama and Georgia, Dora picked up strength and her top wirds Schwirkmann, who Imd joined revved up to (i5 miles an hour, several other members of the Downtown sections of Live West German embassy staff in Oak, Fla., were flooded with up the trip to Zagorsk, "suddenly to 10 feet of water. The town -v on the tipper thigh of was virtually isolated and hun- lighways were closed. Gov. Farris Bryant ordered the National Guard to give assistance it could at Live Oak. Jacksonville, Fla., and Brun- swick, battered for almost 24 tiours by Dora earlier this week, took a new lashing. Some people who were trying to clean the muck and debris from their homes near Jackson- ville were forced to flee again felt a blow his left leg. Slacks Soaked The technician then noted that his slacks were soaked with a liquid. A few hours later, he felt strong pain and was taken lo the U.S. Embassy physician who established thai Ihe injuries were caused by a poisonous chemical. Schwirkmann's condition worsened rapidly, and the American physician snggeslcd Ihal he be transferred to a German hospital. Schwirkmann was taken lo Germany where several doctors agreed that the poison had been mustard gas, a lethal chemical used in combat in World War One, Ibe foreign office said. He is still in crilical condition. Medical needs of the diploma- tic and foreign press corps in Moscow are looked after by doctors at the British and American embassies. The Foreign Office spokes- man said that its Moscow em- bassy had trouble getting Russia Schwirkmann's tour of duly was lo have ended Sept. 8 and he had booked a flight to War- (Sco BONN, Page SA) dreds of families left lomes to seek safety. their Viet Nam, Cuba Issues Hit Again by Goldwater WASHINGTON (AP) Sen.iers while the nominee relaxed Barry Goldwaler demanded and conferred with top aides. Saturday lhat President John-] son tell the nation what is going on in Soulh Viet Nam without Availing for a imlitically oppor- lune moment lo (urn the spot- light on it." Heflieling a smouldering jampaign controversy, the Republican residential nominee charged again that the Demo- crats limed the October 19G2 Cuban missile crisis for political advantage. And lie implied Johnson is "This administration appears lo be playing polilics with inter- lational crisis and potential statement. The Arizona senator added: Goldwater said in a Next morning he said could develop any place. 1 wouldn't be surprised if il hap- INDEX Mrs. H. K. l.eissner Jr. gel- ling ready for the Jaycce-Eltcs While Elephant party At her home Tuesday at p.m. Hay Hljjgs wondering if the bucks are moving in the woods hav- ing Mrs. Oscar Schacfci a birthday loday, and grandson, iMnrc flcrnhard, cele- brating his 12th year on Mon day and also to receive Birthday congratulations Mon- day is Sirs. Jo Curler Mrs. Woodrow IMontdR gelling up lo dale with Ihc Inlcst news while working Paul Frnnz con- fessing n fondness for fishing but nol for fi.sh lo cat Mrs. S. W. Allen of Lognn, Utah, the former Mrs. C. J. Schuchorl of Vicloria, sending greetings to friends and rclnllves Mrs L. Fiedler reminding mem- bers of Pink Lmlics inul friends of Iho lint sale Tuesday from 9 to 7 p.m. nl 1002 Bon Alre A.3.C. Hobby K. Illnnlon, son nf iMr. n ml Airs. Dm I 11. Minn Ion homo on leuvo unit looking forward lo his duties at Oyess AFfl, Ahllcno, Tex. B. I Hurdle .Sr, recovering from a sudden illness nl Be Tnr llos said Elliel would probably inove a litlle lo Hie west of Uic British crown colony, sparing it lop winds of 100 m.p.h. Winds of 50 m.p.h. struck Brunswick, a resort community in Ihe middle of the Georgia coasl lhat look a million-dollar beating from Dora Wednesday night. Five inches of rain fell on the south Georgia town of Waycross within a few hours, forcing al least 14 families lo evacuate Rebel Battalions Take Over Saigon Gen. Khanh Missing From Scene Ousletl General Leader oi' Coup SAIGON (AP) Four battal- ions of Iroops moved into Sai- gon early Sunday in a bloodless coup d'etat. The troops, spearheaded by armored units, were led by Brig. Gen. ban Van Phal who was ousted last week by Pre- mier Khanh. Khanh's whereabouts could nol be learned. The troops were supported by dissident Buddhist elements. That, pausing al Ihe gates to VERDICT PENDING Despondent Local Man Is Found Shot to Death By JAMES SIMONS Advocate Staff Writer A verdict was pending Satur- day night in the early morning shotgun dealh of Hubert Viclor Schroeder, 21, of 80514 Airline said Baass who ordered a post- mortem examination. Baass said Schroeder died of a chest wound fired at close range. Police quoted the attend- ing physician as saying the shot- Road, who police said had been gun blast penetrated the heart despondent over the pulmonal cnvity. Ihe city, told newsmen: "This is nothing lo worry when little Black Creek rose when canals flooded. about, just a little operation against some Arrested Duty Olliccrs The rebel troops invaded Khanh's office and arrested several duty officers but found no trace of Die premier. The rebels also occupied communications centers in Saigon. They disarmed police posts at the point of cannons. No shooting was reported anywhere in the city. Phal appeared to be in com- plete command of the situation. With him were the comman- ders of the Vietnamese Army IV Corps, other officers who had been fired by Khanh. Crowd Huns death of a six-month-old son, a victim of leukemia. Justice of the Peace Alfred C. Baass said a verdicl would lot be returned before Monday lending more investigation by lim and city police who were :allcd to (he Schroeder apart- nent at a.m. Saturday. "I want to check out all ai> gles before I return a over iis banks. Meanwhile, hurricane Ethel was giving the mid-Atlantic resort island o! Bermuda a lashing with winds of 70 m.p.h. However, the Weather Bureau Trees and powerlines fell headquarters were al The senator has claimed 000 people l.avc seen him on the Ciimpaign trail. "When lurn out to see downtown Jacksonville, and windows were smashed by winds that gnsted al least 50 m.p.h. Dora's new course sent gale warnings up from Cape Fear, N.C., to Cape May, N.J. The Weather Bureau said Dora probably would move out to sea over Charleston, S.C., Saturday night and regain hurricane strength with winds of 75 m.p.h. and up. Dora, centered about 50 miles west of here, was dumping tons of rain on southeastern Georgia and northeastern Florida and me.ins lr> said. In Seattle on Wednesday, GolJwater chafed that Ihe Democrats, tinder (he late Prcsiden: John Kennedy, timed Ihe Cxban crib's to "take action at a time thai v-ould have n'axsinum political impact." "A m eric a n s imisl be doing Ilic same thing now he said that lime, he situation in Southeast Asia, "under such an administration, to be faced ky crisis of some sort jusl before election. What will il be this Ihe home of the former mayor of Saigon, also fired by Khanh. The whole operation appeared to be patterned after the blood- less coup lasl Jan. 30 when Khanh took power. A crowd of people who had altended a mass at Saigon's Roman Catholic Cathedral, across the street from the com- munications center, ran in panic with the approach of the para- troopers. There was no sign of any air activity over the city despile promises by the commander of (he air corps two weeks ago that his aircraft would quickly -i i WUUIU UUlL.ft.1V lashing a :i2p-mile-wide area damp out any coup against the with gales. Winds were expect- p ed to diminish from Savannah Republican camiuU.le, "that southward, wilh strongest winds svell to the cast of the pressure center. Throughout northern Florida and southern Georgia, roads !ere bcinpT closed and homes afier 5unrise' The sUua" (ion was confused and it was not evacuated as flood waters crept higher. In Gainesville, Fla., rushing waters were trapped in a dead end and rose lo roof level in a residential section. In Cross City, Fla., streets, (Sec DORA, Page 6A) If there is a crisis growing in Viet Nam, now is the time to [ell the people about it. If there s a solution brewing there, now is the time lo tell the American iiople a Irani it. "This is not the time (o be righting i) war in the dsrk, to he- facing an uncertain future in the dark, lo be wailing for a politi- cally opportune moment lo lurn Ihe spotliphl on it." Goldwater thus kept vip the punching at John- son thnl mnrkeri the first week nf his campaign for Ihe White House. He heads south Tuesday for another round. Ill's statement was issued at Republican national hc-adquart- Suspect Sought by Police Police Saturday were looking for a man suspccled of slabbing Alfred Castillo of 3GOT. Willie St. in his lefl arm Friday night nl Ihe Juan Linn-F.rnst Streets in- tcrscclion. Castillo told City Patrolman C. W. Chance Ihal the man ap- proached him and asked to bor- row some money lo buy a drink wilh. Cntillo snid he replied lhat he didn't hnvc any money   to be gained by involving anoth- er independent branch of gov- Goldwater, in a speech Friday in Chicago, said that "Of all three branches of goverrmont, today's Supreme Court is the least faithful lo the constitution- Victoria Democrats Pledged to Connally Victoria County's delegalion to Ihe Democratic Stale Con- vention in Dallas Tuesday will go there firmly committed to cast their 13 votes in support of Gov. John B, Connally, Ihe proposed by the governor's forces. The delegation was instructed by the county convention last May to vole under the unit rule in support of the governor, and 11 Victorians Due to Attend Republican State Convention Eleven Victorians will leave this week for Austin to parlici- pale in the Republican state convention. The convention will be held at the Austin Municipal Audi- torium. ham. It's unusual and 1 enjoy it. Vicloria delegates lo This year, however, I've learned to speak for myself I find f am carrying Kurloy (her venli'iloqiiist (lummy) less nnd less." The second question was, "I understand you nlwtws entry n Bible with you. What docs religion menu to "I do not consider my Ilible a Hood hick she said. "II BKAUTY, Page 6A> the convention will be Dean Tru- man, county chairman; Mrs. Betty Jo Buhlcr, district com- mittcewoman for the 18th sen- atorial district nnd Mrs. Bill Knebel, Mrs. Jack Boirc, Iloli- clcntial candidate, will be Ihe erl Campbell, Mrs. II. H. Ab- erpnlhey, G. P. Keisler, Mrs. John Stormont, Mrs. Elvorgne Democratic nominee for re-j these instructions were followed election, and the platform to the presidential stale con- _ at Houston in June. In a letter to all delegates this week, Gov. Connally ad- vised them that "we seem to be in the midst of convention season. White our Dallas con- vention next week will not have quite Ihe TV coverage and notoriety of Atlantic City, it is every bit as important to you stale chairman and vice-chair- man, name 62 members to the stale executive committee, and draw up a new state platform. and lo me. "I need your help in draft- Marrs, Dr. M. C. Williams and opened their local campaign Carl Turner. The delegates will elect Hio Cirnmle. Truman said harmony is ex- jng of a parly piaiform peeled to prevail at Ihe convcn-ihelping to plan our acliviliw (ion, with nil delegates lining (or (he next Iwo years. More- up solidly bchircl the (nc selection of a corn- standard bearers, Sen, Barry miltceman and a committee- Goldwaler of Arizona and woman to represent your scn- liam E. Miller. atorial district on Ihe Slatf. Miller, Ihe GOP vice-prcsi- Democratic Executive Commit- tee is a mailer of prime im- portance. I'm obviously Inter- ested in who they will be, since this Is the group will have to work with during the next two years lo build a bctlur Texas." (See DEMOS, Pajt M) keynote speaker at the conven- tion. Victoria County Repiibllears (headquarters lasl week al 506   

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