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Advocate: Sunday, September 6, 1964 - Page 1

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - September 6, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                DEVOUR CULINARY SUCCESS When Dinner Bell Rang, They Just Served Pie---A Six Tonner DENBY BALE. England The great pie of Deiihy Dale, largest ever seen in this home of raon- sler pies, emerged In tri- umph from its oven Satur- day and was promptly de- voured by waiting throngs. For 36 hours its six Ions of heef, potatoes, spices and crust, had naked ami bub- bled in Hector Buckley's barn, overlooked by a herd of cows, including the moth- ers of sonic of ils ingrctli- cuts. As eating lime drew near, Ihe pie, on ils IG-whccler trailer, started a ceremoni- al journey to the field in which Denhy Dale has eat- en pie for at least two cen- turies. Pipe, brass and jazz hands heralded Its progress. Behind cumc a dozen floats devoted to the theme that Ihe next most appetizing thing to a pie Is a prclty girl. After a blessing from (he village parson and a hymn in memory of four Den by pie organizers killed in a car crash, the crust was cul. From Ihe interior of the massive pie dish rose a magnificent aroma. Thou- sands lined up for a morsel. It proved jieerless pie, rich and spicy wllh enough salt to generate an ade- quate thirst, and a crust ex- actly the right shade of brown, Its culinary success was Indisputable. Commercial success, how- ever, was In some doubt. The crowd of to ooo fell below the vast as- semblage for which the vil- lage committee had pre- pared. Enough was there, however, to demolish Ihe pie, which was divided Into portions and sold at 10 shillings a piece, including the price of a commemorative plate. Denby Dale, a Yorkshire village otherwise known for Ils fine worsled clolh, has been making great pics since the 18th century. The first, in 1788, cele- brated a temporary bout of sanity on the furl of King George 111. The second, 27 years later, greeted Bri- tain's victory over Napole- on. The 1887 pic for Queen Victoria's jubilee went bad and is recalled with a shud- der by the village elders as the "high pie." This year's pie was the eighth, and was larger than any seen before. 11 cele- brates the four royal births of 1961, among them Queen Elizabeth's third son, Prince Edward. The pie survived reported threats of sabotage, which Dcnby suspects originated in the neighboring village ol Clayton West, where they specialize In giant puddings. 11 survived, too, Ihe haz- ardous descent of a hill called Bomb Pickle, a hill so steep that one previous pic overturned and was trampled to death by the pie-crazed crowd. The steel dish holding the latest pie measured 18 feet long by 6 feel wide and 18 inches deep. Now lhat Ihe pie Is eaten, the pie com- mittee hopes to sail the dish across the English Channel. THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 1S 119th 122 TELEPHONE HI 1-1491 VICTORIA, TEXAS, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1964 Established 1818 38 Pages All-Time High State Budget Due .Requests Rise Million AUSTIN the state comptroller recorded Ihe state's largest general revenue fund balance in 15 years Tuesday, budget makers were completing (lie largest budget request in ihc state's history. The fiscal 1901 year books were closed with million left over. Requests for the 1966 and 1967 fiscal years added up to increase of million. Where's Money? This sels the stage for the 1965 legislature, where one of the main problems again will be: Where to get Ihe money to pay the bills. The million balance, budg- et officials say, probably will be repealed next year. This would give lawmakers a head start on 1966-67 financing. But, Lt. Gov. Preston Smilh points out, "This good news is quickly tempered by the realization thnt normal growth increases for education alone will consume Ihc S70-S60 mil- lion surplus automatically and leave a ?50 million gap." Didn't Deter Smith's warning has not deterred the state agencies from asking big increases. The budget-writing cycle be- gan early (his year, when the Legislative Budget Board mailed instructions to stale agencies. Then, one al a lime, the agen- cies look Iheir budgets before examiners of the budget hoard and the Governor's Budget Ot- REIGNS OVER Patricia StifJle- mirc, 18, wearing her crown as queen of the 1964 Calhoun County Fishing Festival, is shown hold- ing the trophy that goes with victory in the event, which lasts through Monday noon. WORTH 800 Fishermen Shoot for Prizes Advocate News Service PORT LAVACA Nearly 800 fishermen are competing for over in prizes to be Calhoun County Fishing val here over the Labor Weekend. No records were broken division set by Hen- jof Victoria. This topped 14-ounce fice. The first Waco for E set the pace for others the judges want higher salaries, budget examiners were told. Summer Hearings I The hearings continued almost' IVpW Stoi'lTI daily during Ihe summer, Ihe last one will be hold Friday T? .1 "1 O at East Texas State College in Hi III6l 06611 Commerce. Budget Board rec- ommendations will be made] J Senate Majority Leader Mike Mansfield, D-Monl., called Ihe attack on Humphrey "one of the most vicious, false and mali- cious documents in American political history." "Sen. Humphrey has publicly opposed and fought nearly all of the views ascribed to him by Rep. Mansfield said. 'Note of Deceit' House Speaker John McCor- mack, D-Mass., said lhat Miller had opened his campaign on a "note of deceit and deception, half-lrulhs and vicious personal attack." Miller, in his first major campaign address at Lockport, N.Y., called Humphrey's record "clearly one of the most radical in Congress" and criticized Humphrey's connection with American for Democratic Ac- tion which backs what it terms liberal causes and issues, Mansfield, in a statement issued at the Capitol, said Mill- jheadqiiartcrs weighfstation wasp's attack on Humphrey am (the 8-pound, 8-ouncc redfish ounted to "slanderous assaults the character of caught by Poko Maretick by ounces in the first day's fishing last year. Tlie largest fish caught in the first day's action was the 40-pound, 7-ounce drum caught Ua5' by Joe Chovanec of Point Com- fort and weighed at Uie Point in Comfort Boat Club. It broke the the first day's fishing, though! 1963 first day record in the the 4-pound, 4-ounce record in drum division made by Law- rence E. Kolar, also of Point Comfort, with his 38-pound, 7- catch. Kolar's 1962 48- thejpound entry is the record hold- fish jer in this division. The first fish weighed at the Political Campaign Hits Boiling Point in Hurry Dem Chiefs Rap Attack By Miller Label 11 False, Vicious WASHINGTON (AP) De- mocratic leaders of the Senate and House on Saturday aimed a one-two political punch at Rep. William E. Miller, Republican vice-presidential candidate, for Miller's opening attacks on Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey, his mocratic rival. De- BUT BEING CONSIDERED LBJ Puts High Cost On Stopping the Draft WASHINGTON (AP) Presi-iwater, the Republican presiden- tial candidate, who made a campaign promise to end the draft "as soon as possible." Goldwaler accused Johnson of using the Selective Service system for "political and social schemes." dent Johnson suggested Sattir day that a quick end to the military draft might cost sever- al billion dollars. But he didn't rule out the possibility lhat the draft may be halted next year. This was the highlight of a 35- minute news conference in which Johnson announced some notable military and nuclear advances and, in a statement of philosophy, urged that all Americans resist "the spirilual cancer of hate." In discussing the draft, John- son look a more cautious posi- tion than the one voiced earlier of Defense Robert S. McNa'- this week bp Sen. Barry Gold- out the draft, the armed forces would have to pay more in re- enlistment bonuses and might be forced to increase pay and fringe benefits lo attract enough volunteers. When asked about Gold- Miller Fires All Out at Humphrey Rips Ties With ADA LOCKPOHT, N.Y. (AP) Rep. William B. Milfcr opened his campaign for the vice presi- [dency Saturday with an all-out water's statement on the draft, attack on his jjemocralic oppo- The President said a dislm- Johnson noted that Uie adminis-jneni an [rom guished member of one of the, u" congressional armed services: committees, whom he did not name, estimated "it would cost us several billions to act precip- itously" to halt the draft. Johnson didn't elaborate on this theme. However, Secretary mara has suggested that, wilh- (ration has been studying the Barry possibility of ending the live Service for several months.j "t run proudlv wuh Bill He said the aim isjo determine Goldwater said, after an- jnouncing that, if elected, he would ask for automatic income the effect on mobilization andj, [fie impact on costs. Some interim findings may cuts available within the next few weeks, "and probably some (See LB.I, Page 12A) Public Hearing Set for Budget The hearings produced Ihe (caught by Miss Joan Chovanec j on Point Comfort. The largest whose personal integrity r jfish caught off the pier was a been (he admiration of all 123-pound drum caught by Al- Public hearing on a record city budget of will highlight a lengthy post-holiday City Council meeting scheduled for 5 p.m. Tuesday at City Hall. The represents an- ticipated working capital, in- cluding Uie 1963-64 balance, ex- pected for the fiscal year which will begin Ocl. l, while expen- (dilurcs of have been cataloged. This leaves a pro- posed ending balance of Republican tial candidate began presiden- his cam- paign formally in his native city o! where both his parents were Democrats until he entered politics. Crowd of Miller lashed at his Demo- cratic opponent, Sen. Huburt H. Humphrey as a founder of an organization trying (o subvert the U.S. government into a "for- eign, socialist tolalitarianism." Farm Youth Burned by Tank Blast A 15-year-old rice farm em- ______rl ploye suffered multiple burns "The Saturday afternoon when.an deputies at more than 20- nlosion raked a 500-gailon lank [MO, stood on the Niagara Coun- loaded with butane and a cater-jty Fairgrounds under a sunny pillar tractor on the on a warm, later-summer Craigen farm two miles northjday, to cheer Milter and Gold- actual printed budget was pre- pared earlier in Ihe summer. These additional fund requests have cut deeply into an already, meager contingency fund of and any further unex- pected expenditures during the coming twelve months probably will eat into the expected end- ing balance. Helped by an increase of, some natural arms and the left for us.' the assessed valuations, thejof nis tacc and first and second! Answer Technique of (he city limits on Road. Salem water. Introducing Miller, Goldwater George Hernandez was taken .'said that "we come from differ- to Hohf Clinic and Hospital forjent parts of the country but we treatment of third degree burns [believe alike that the gov- MIAMI, Fla. (AP) A new same pleas as in previous'lropical slorm, Ethel, joined years: Stale agencies are los-JDora on Saturday in (he Atlan- jbert D. Hood Jr. of Port La- vaca. The smallest crab caught by a child under 12 years was the Id-inch entry caught by Johnny Jlobizel, also of Port La- of those who have known and worked with him." Disavowal Asked "Nothing can exceed the outrage of the effort to link Sen. Humplirep's name with charges Mansfield con- ing good men because and was expected to quicklylvaca. are too low; deplorable physi-iwhip herself into a full-fledged! Twelve of the 21 cal conditions nncl growth re-jbiit harmless hurricane. j awarded first day prizes were "In all public life, no man's of entries tinued. quire new buildings; and stale colleges need to spend more to Botli storms were hundreds of jCaughi off the new fishing pier, miles from each other and Festival records standing in keep up with national of'miies from'iand.'oii and higher enrollments. !lneil. courses, they presented no -Some examples: 'threat (o the United Stales. j Hospital Board Asked for, Ethel, fifth storm of Ihe sea-j a 28 per cent jump lo was spotted by the Tiros (Scr BUDGET, E'age 12A) jwcafher satellite. A -jhimler plane confirmed j position about miles cast-i northeast of San Juan, Puerto' Rico. At lhat lime, her peak winds! were 70 miles an hour, just) (See FESTIVAL, Page 12A> honesty and probity is less in question. Even his most hitler (See CHIEFS, Page 21A) attoOcU VdlUal lUIli. UltJ uitu (city vyill be able to offer itsldegi'ee burns on his back. Hej Miller cited Humphrey's con- The ending balance figure Is ambitious record budget with-jwas released from the highly optimistic, a tax increase, night. jDemoci The resulting fire completely'founder and current vice chair- since a number of fund re- quests have been received and some granted since the The lax rate, which will be set at Ihe end of the public hear- ing, will again be on the INDEX Aerology ......7A Denlhs Cedes 2A Editorial Blrlh! ........2A Farm Books ........FUN Movies Classified ..10-I1A Spans Comics ........I UN Television Crossword ....FUN Women's vyith Americans for !Democratic Action (ADA) as a of assessed value. The city to the tank, assesses at 45 per cent of ac- Hernandez destroyed the traclor valued and said lhat organization and caused damage1...... tual value. per and total Victoria College Courses FindingFavor With Adults take an art course like we offer college presi- That is the tuition found it can offer a service to the adult community and to in- classcs more suitable than those valuation for Uie coming year will be approximately -flO. Discussion of a peddler's or- dinance proposed by the Viclo- ria Chamber of Commerce also I is scheduled al the Tuesday ses- sion. City Ally. Argyle McLac- [hlan said no action is scheduled on the measure, however. i With the firsl paving phase] of the paving and drainage bond issue ncaring! completion, council also has! scheduled discussion of a new Ihoroughfare lighting program. was seated on the advocated policies ranging from repeal of internal security leg- islation at home to a "disas- assessed Iraclor while operating a winch'trous coalition program" in connected lo a trailer on which [Southeast Asia. Ihe tank was located when the! Employing a technique that is tongue of Ihe trailer droppedibecoming increasingly popular lo the ground causing a pipejamong candidates on the nation- (Sce YOUTH, Page 1 See 5I1LLER, Page 12A) OFFICE ATTACK worked out in conjunction with Central Power and Light Co. Child Welfare Employe Is Clubbed by Woman a from the office and taken to a car. The car, occu- pied by two of the women, the again Monday from noon midnight Mr. and Airs.! _ Victor HcrnntKlM back from a Sell, Will 01- month m Guadalajara, Mexico A. J. Onrncr rescuing a motorist Henry C. Kuckorl marking a bhlliiby yeslerdny Mrs. I. K. Owrns gelling ready for her display of gift items nnd holiday decorations in the President J Moore said. "They can The collegi classes ha among adult students. D.j Partly cloudy Sunday through Women enroll for many dif-IOfO'c find: Monday with daytime showers fcrent reasons. Some may a girl were being held by police lso on the agenda releasediSatu teen-ager and the two children, TIT ri> TEI io lour lexas WASHINGTON (AP) Sen. Goldwnlcr will visit six Texas cities within seven days lime lo take a morning Ihundershowers over aboutljooking forward to work that and still be able lo have Ibe 25 per cent of the area. Mosllyirequircs a knovvl evening free for social aclivi- ensl to southeast daytime or ai lies and their families. from 3 lo 5 p.m.'Uxlny at IhejPn'S11 McNnmnrn O'Connor Fine Arts ''c starting Scpl. 13 in his cam- Museum Kclicc Gon- Mlcs wishing for anolher trip lo Mexico Cily again soon, where she met a college friend, Mrs. Uclnnldo Sanliso and fam- ily of Brownsville J. R. Bumgnrrtncr having (rouble for- gcltini! those smnll details Mrs. Mnrjorlo Kcavcs pnsslnt the lime of day with a bit oi humor Mrs, n. lludlcr realizing llmo Is going by fnst when sno looks at her three sons (iwyiin and Lynn Col- lln.s and Bllllc l.lmlsoy having a well known teen-nge hnn'l director nml Ills limid members from San Arilonlo pny Diem a visit. Ihe presidency, 'c will visit Longvicw Sept. 18, Amarillo, Odessa nnd Mid- land Sept. 22 and Kort Worth nnd Dallas Scpl. 2.1. "Some attend to finish aca- demic requirements, but many are interested only in clnsses of special interest." Many women, including sev- eral present teachers in Hie Victoria school system, returned (to Victoria College after an in- at 10 to 20 m.p.h., and gusty in vicinily of showers. Expect- ed Sunday temperatures: High !M, low 72. South Ccnlrnl Texas: Pnrlly cloudy and warm Sunday and The Republican nominee education. They com )cr cent of south. (inrt in mid out of Texas only Sept. 23 reserved for an all- day stay in the slnle. Presumably Ihe highlighl of Die Fort Worlh-Dnllns trip will n speech al the American convention In Dallas. Today's Chuckle. Thny keep Idling us Hint women urn snuiilor (linn men, hut rtiil yon cvrr si'o mnn wcnring n shirt that hultonrd In the luu'k 'HJ'lplclcd two years college here and wcnl on to other schools lo gel tlieir degrees. Other women have altendcd courses of special interest such us mi, music, typing, short- hand, accounting, business ma- chines, speech, Spanish nncl oth- ers. Theso can bo taken ns non- credit courses with I he only re ntilrement for rcgistrnllon heinj thnl Ihe student ho 21 years o ago and hnvo an Inlcresl in tnk- Ing the course. In Oils way, Ihe college has Monday with daytime showers (here are always Uioso who in and Ihundershowers over 20-30 terruptcd Iheir education some- where down the line and have Temperatures Saturday: High reached Ihe point where they 91, low 72. Precipitation Saturday: .01; total this year to date, 22.72 inches. Tides (Port Lnvacs Port n.m. and p.m. Highs al these a p.m. Sunday and a.m. Monday. Unrometrlc pressure at sea level: 29.88, Monday (U09, Tins uirutmntioii baaed on data I rn in the US, WedlUer Bureau Victoria 'ledge of typing, accounting. Oth- ers may be active in civic cir- cles and desire to become bet- ter speakers. Some have al- ways wanted to study a cer- tain subject like art, Span- ish or music. And, of course, Occupy Experts CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. (AP) tried Saturday lo figure out how lo turn the ap- parent failure of OGO, Ameri- ca's most-advanced and most peculiar-locking scienlific satel- lite, into success. Most of the experts planned lo return lo Goddard Space Flight Ccnler in Maryland and lay in pur- One of the suspects, a iycar-old- Los Angeles, Blanton and City Patrolman woman, will be charged Tues-jJim Black halted the car in the day with assault with inlenl to 5100 block of North Vine Street phy said the suspected womanipccted of clubbing Mrs. Cerda Kave lime to continue work to- plans Saturday. Monday, they ward a degree. will get their last chance to The above and many otherlmake OGO work. reasons are given by ndiitt stu- dents at Victoria College. And O'Connor Lows at by offering students such as chance to they need, OGO, which stands for Orbit- ing Geophysical Observatory, wns launched Friday night. lake Iho Within three hours scientists at Iho com munity college has found it is helping to add to (he gene nil environment of the Sunset Sunday: Sunrise Victoria area, ndmlnislrnlors sny. Day school will (See COLLEGE, Page 12A) Ihe iiosmon, N'.C., tracking stations discovered the malfunc- tions. Two booms, containing apparatus for experiment, failed lo open. A 30-foot radio antenna for roinying Informa- tion back to earth also failed to open. murder, a police spokesman said. City Patrolman Joseph Mur- al a point where the road dead- ends. Meanwhile, Uie woman sus- will be accused of picking up a metal desk device used for punching holes in papers and clubbing Mrs. Cerda with it at least four times. Mrs. Cerda's physician de- scribed the injuries as super- ficial lacerations. She was ad- mitted for overnight observa- tion at De Tar Hospital. The woman suspected of In- flicting the injuries was trans- ferred from police headquar- ters to county jail Saturday. The other three remained at po- lice headquarters pending had fled from the office on foot. She hitched a ride lo a farm house on Cuero Highway and telephoned Ihe sheriff's office that she wanted to surrender. .She was picked up at (he (arm house by Deputy Sheriff Otto Kubccka and was taken to the sheriff's office from where she was released to city police for investigation of the attack. Wcarden said the attack oc- curred while the children were being visited in his office by Ihoir mother and the teenager, who are further action, with lite leen-age'children, sisters. aged 3 He snid the and 4, be referred lo Juvenilejbeen placed in temporary cus- tody of the welfare unit about Probation Oificcr D. A. Brian. Police snid lhat as Ihe al- lock occurred, two smnll chil- two months ago. He said Ihe maternal grand- dren of one of Ihe women were (See EMPLOYE, Page   

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