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   Advocate (Newspaper) - August 17, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 102 TELEPHONE HI S-HSl Hope Seen To Break Talkathon Liberal Fight Seen Slowing WASHINGTON (AP) Lead- ers revived hopes Sunday of a midweek break in a (alk mara- thon by liberals which would bring the Senate to grips with the legislative apportionment issue. Action on the for- eign aid authorization bill has been stalled while liberals o[ both parlies have fought an at- tcmpl to attach to it as a rider a proposal to delay court or- dered apportionments oC both houses of state legislatures on a population basis. The liberals, who started their talk last Friday, were reported to have fewer than 10 willing to speak. Leadership lieutenants figured Ihey might run out of speeches by Wednesday, with a possibility of a vote on the issue thereafter. Compromise Plan Tlie liberals have contended that a proposal by Republican Leader Everett M. Dirksen of Illinois, concurred in by Demo- cratic Leader Mike Mansfield of Montana, would involve an un- constitutional invasion of the au- thority of the judiciary. Sens. Jacob K. Javils, U-N.Y., and Eugene J. McCarthy, D- Minn., came up with a com- promise Sunday they said in a statement they will present as "an alternative to the Dirksen- Mansfield amendment which should solve the dilemma in which the Senate now finds it- self." sense MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 1964 Established 1849 14 Perish in Accident SHOESHINE GIRL Lillian Reyes is only 12, but she has a thriving business as a shoeshine girl on a street corner in New York. She says she wants to open a regular shoe- shine parlor, and have only girls working lor her. She charges 25 cents a shine, and clears up to a week with tips, she says. She )ives on Manhattan's Lower East Side, and wants to be a doctor or a lawyer "or something like that." (AP Photo) 53 Hurt as Rioting Rips Chicago Area ,DIXMOOR' fAP> shot, one a Negro and Ihe Ste t '-.the Chicago other a white man. rourls HTO i m 1NfiEroes noted in me Chicago'other a white man. S HppoStirM: W. a short fuse In said Capt. C.W. Oliver, slate police question. More Sweeping Bill Dirksen immediately dis- missed this as meaningless be- cause it would be only advisory and not mandatory. Sen. Clinton P. Anderson, D- N.M., an opponent of the Dirk- scn-Mansfield rider, said he) finds H unsatisfactory because it is vague about tlie time that would be permitted for action on a constitutional amendment. In Ihe House, the Rules Com- mittee luis approved a much more sweeping measure that would prohibit federal court ac- tion on legislative apportion- ment. Mansfield said he to hold the Senate in lengthy ses- sions during the week in an ef- fort to clean up ils work so that Congress can adjourn before thc Democratic N'alonal Convention opens Aug. '2-1. Otherwise, be sai have to come back convention. 'or suburb of Dixmoor Sunday] The Holers roamed freely for district" commander "They Abcmt UlQ sam? timc> phlllP night, injuring at least 53 per- several hours while city, slale (Negroes) are in the weeds and ls> white civil rights sons, most of them while. and county police and firemen I every where else worker and student at Princeton Dozens of Ihe injured were hil cordoned off the area. The Fimllv nn University, was beaten by a we by flying bricks as awaited reinforcements and nr wllh bat at a slates to apportion their legisla lure on a constitutional basi: and for action on a constitution al ampnHmpnf nmTftriYirt II, "tii; MIL UJl Illc ell urt. I lie UO-j amendment covering the by flying bricks as awaited reinforcements and ilvie" stoned passing cars and white'kepl out hundreds of white men rifle r-im ,t bllsy residents in the predominantly with Uie aid of police dogs. To move in policemen Corning, N.Y., vvi w. Son Burning c? Crosses Dot South Race Violence Leaves 1 Dead Racial violence flared in the South over the weekend, leaving one dead, several persons in- jured and scores of burning crosses dolled across Uio coun- tryside. A rash of incidents were re- ported in Jackson, Miss., on night, while other ---jjor flareups occurred at Greenwood, Miss., and Albany, Ga. Most of tlie cro.ss-buniiiujs were in Louisiana and Missis- at Jackson arrested Olivia Barbecue Attracts i Desmond and! OLIVIA The Ihird arc guests of Mr. and barbecue sponsored by the Mrs. K. E. Rogers. Olivia and Port Alto commun-i Kunds from last year's bar- i f M urn mm. vJiii d mn t.. _ilr i ,sti! itics on Ciirancnhun Bay, held1 bcc-uc were used to purchase C'lrly lrllfllc ut the Olivia Community Centerand erect a fire siren cosling rilln slick highway Sunday drew a crowd of oral more thnn SHOO. The siren canjne'T Wliarlon proved fatal Sun. day to n young Victoria mother and her lu-monlh-olil son. Dead were Mrs. Leroy WM sippi. Police two young while men for shoot- ing a Negro. The victim, Willie Earl Guynes, 18, was not odi- ously wounded. Police charged Markus Perkins and D. J. Haw- kins, both in their 20s, will, shooting with intent after of- ficers said they shot Guynes in Ihe thigh with a .22-caliber pis- tol. Beaten With Bat About tho same time, Philip BENEFIT EI'EJVT Car, Truck In Head-On Collision Throe Others Seriously Hurl persons. I be operated by the lelcphone Leo Kaincr, chairman of in Ward, IS miles barbecue committee, Sunday] nwny. Funds this yew will be night reported personsiuscd (or were fed al noon und l.OOO.communlly J provements on the "P" I her 20 of 1205 H, Volsung, am) Donald Earl. Doth tvL-umg. ima ini.nmi.-ui 111 L' (Hlllinmem, flflCl 10 IIUIUI n'worc Hoiul nl lhn Iridcrs from house for the pump and Zc'ct ai Victoria ami Port Ln-donated by Conrad Damslrom.! c-nrroU   O C" O 11 Ct "lc "ccidciU. and were being treated In a hospital at Wbar- Taken by Labor BROWNSVILLE. Tex, "le executive board ot the Tcx- floor Thursday for n (innl ilcel- Negro suburb. Two persons! "It's like 200 tons of TNT with NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP) Greek Cypriots greeted joyfully Sunday a Soviet offer to help in Ihe event of an invasion of Cy- Greek Cypriote Cheer Offer of Russian Support "If anyone shoots, we're shooting he said. fire was month were inspired by Wash- ington and London. The Soviet leader called for Britain to withdraw its troops from Cy- prus and President Makariosjprus, but made no mention a local hospital. A cross was burned at the in- tersection after tlie attack and Tim nf ciri ,n lorsccuon iiiier uie aliacK am arm5fiTO "'IT cross-burnings were hpirrf Siimboor L a suburb of about ing out of control in the area, where police and firemen from all surrounding suburbs, the city of Chicago, tlie state and county were gathered. The riot reportedly began at a store at M7th Street and WBSlc was under pressure to fly to ij.N. peacekeeping force 0tiu'eRtertl Avenue, where a Negro Moscow immediately to start whicb the Britons form a part ;roman with negotiations. _ the owner who accused her of negotiations. Makarios, a Greek Orthodox archbishop, is still bitterly op- posed to Western mediation ef- forts lo solve (he eighl-monlli- old crisis, U. N. mediation ef- u wm fol'fs were dealt a blow: In Ge- after tlle U.N. mediator, iSakari S. Tuomioja of Finland, SL2KT came from Moscow on Satur- day. picketing thc liquor store. Witnesses said hundreds of inineases said iiunan Joyful news has said police cordoned off thc aren thc anti-Makanos righl-wingikecping crowds of while persons newspaper Mahi. outside. Having gangs of Ne- One w-eekly paper suggested groes were reported roving the JIIYI-JIIIUU. o. llLUIIIIUja Ol 1- inland "vivi I House Speaker John W. Mc-jsuffered a mild stroke and was broaden his Cabinet area. nn_-i- Cormack, D-Mass., said to a hospital just lr> Communists doubts very much that scheduled departure for can complete its work and ad- in Greece, Turkey and Cyprus. Premier Khrushchev warned s as though we'll have [Turkey that any further allacks he said on the.'on Cyprus might boomerang. Tass quoted him as telling an audience in the central Asian journ before the convention opens. "It looks lo come b ABC television-radio program "Issues and Answers." Thc The key peared to be In the final pa graph of the Kremlin slatc-i menl: "If a foreign armed in-i -..V. i llc nuuicinje ui uie central Asian speaker said it is impossible to city of Frunze that "imperialist estimate how long Congress might sit after the convention. "Some people say a he said, which would be La- boi plotters" had fanned up the con- flict between Greek and Turkish Cypriots in order to reoccupy the island. He also charged thai the Page ll> ITurkish air strikes earlier this Most of the injured were re- i wuvif vot VI HIV III JUt W VI O fl ey to the Soviet offer at Memorial Ho: to be in the final in IIarvey, where 25 to (See ItlOT, Page II) vasion of the territory of the Ro-; I I T I public of Cyprus lo defend tier IVHailll ,1 ilkeS freedom and independence from TV foreign invasion and is pro-! Viet iNtUM (Sec SUPPORT, Page 11) Today's Chuckle A ret-ent survey shnws that four out of five women haters are women. Mrs. Johnson Relaxes With Ride on Rub her Raft as A.FL-CIO recommended Sun Uiat forccs "as" 'section. Hocker The honrd niel Sinulay aflcr- tou. Mrs, Hogon was Ibo driver of onto. The car wns involved in virtual hend-on collision wilh n truck Irnctor headed toward Houston, mid driven by Wnlliso Jerry Hrynnt, 29, of Houston. The auto was (raveling west. Highway Patrolman John Eas- 'as admitted, to pre-stale convention board meeting, will go to a convention coinmillec Monday and reach conversion committee Mon- MOOSE, Wyo. (AP) _ Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson, wearing red stretch pants and a plaid shirt afld with binoculars dangling Irom her neck, thoroughly en- joyed a four-hour rubber raft ride Sunday. She floated down the Snake River of northwestern Wyom- ing, viewed wilderness and wild life and paused for a fish fry of fresh cutthroat trout. Mrs. Johnson proved to be the best game spotter as she called attention to a V-formation of Canadian geese streaking over- head. Delightedly, the President's wife turned her binoculars on a[ CAP ST. JACUES, Viet Nam 'AP) Alaj. Gen. Nguyen Khanh took over Ihe presidency of South Viel Nam on Sunday ibul supreme power's were [placed in Ihe hands of a 62- mcmber Revolutionary Council, Khanh promulgated a new constitution and vowed to crush opposition political parties. Moving up from premier, Khanh replaced Mnj. Gen. Duong Van Alinh who had held the presidency only as a figure- head chief of state. The now powers given to Khanh restored a powerful presidential system similar lo lhal which was abol- reporled that eight or JO shots were fired at Iheir car on a Jackson slrcct. Police said Ihree hullcLs were recovered from Ihe car. IVoundcd In Head At Greenwood, Silas McGhcc, 20, a Negro civil rights worker, was wounded in Uie head by a pislol bullel, and admitted to a Greenwood hospital. Tho Student Nonviolent Coor- dinating Committee SNCC, spearheading a Negro votcr- regislralion drive in Mississip- pi's delta area, said McGhee was shot as he sal in a car in front of a Greenwood cafe. Wit- nesses said the bullel came from a passing stnlion wagon occupied by Iwo while men, Al Albany, one person was injured and two arrested in a brick- and bolllc-lhrowing spree by Negroes afler police falally shot a Negro man. Several stores in Ihe Harlem section (Sec VIOLENCE, Page II) Driver' Fined For Lea iuires ;is inindrcds of delegates rairotman John lislncl 111 a t .representing labor union locals 'lc'Jp' invcsllgnlcd tile ncci- than one legis- the slate galni-rcd.'11'111. 5ilicl -Sunday night that mine district. for (jlc uu, Bryunt told liirn that he ap- would let more later serve the same district. ,lu, HIlr The resolution, approved In a cm convention. Highlight of the opening ses- sion Monday is a specially pre- 1 message from President! Crasli Scene plied thc vehicle's brakes when it appeared thul Ihe scdnn was edging over inlo his Inno. liain was fiilling nl the time. Truck Jnckmtcd The truck jnckniCcd, wilh (ho collision resulting, Kaslcy said, The bodies of Mrs. Williams and her son were removed to A Corpus borough, D-Tex. Support u! Johnson's adminis- tration and condemnation of He- um, WL-IU lemovec, 10 publiciin presideiiliiil nominee) Ihe Wheeler Funeral Home in Harry Goldwnlcr is a key iin-' Wlinrlon, but were taken later dcrtonc the labor the day lo (he l-'rcund Arriving delegates were handed! l''uncrul Home in Cuern n lengthy pamphlcl highly crill-j siirvivine Mrs Williams .-ire Chrisli motorisljcal of (ioMwalcr as being was approximately S2II5 poorer Sunday after paying a fine in Port Lavaca drunk- cness, and in Victoria on a charge of failure and render aid. The man is Jack Donaldson, 26. Uoth of (he fines from an incident about S.'M hill. mously approved Sunday a lirl -..II" Mrs.'Alfred llarryrnmi, M 'of Victoria; three brotliers the executive b_o a rd iinr.nl-; Alfred L. and James Paul in, both of Victoria, and serving n- ini; vi..T. iinvy; find her legislation and congratulating John J. Hogan of varborough as co-author of Ihcjfjiin Antonio i The boy's survivors, In A group of 'n'li'striiil unions tloH (o those of his mother, in- wiilnn the AI'IXMO organ- KranamMKr  sian musicians who minds and rolurn IVJimil >fl IIILIJ WllfJILtf. 51 fi'c-r-' Before going to thc airport I group ti change.drummer Doris Midncy, 27 and through liv to the bassist Igor lierccshtls 31, toy1 windows and threw Another group tossed a trash 'c plate glass ji, wjivi mannociuins Saturday and sought asylum iSoy'et nr entef a refugee'JapancM officials they did "lc slrcct, Ihcy said. he U.S. Embassy here, hoarded ;want Ui relurn to the Sovict Un-1 lrive were arrested as the a plane which will make slops at Anchorage, Alaska, and Copenhagen. Japanese police at the airport said the two had U.S. passports and were going nighl' with will. to Wesl Germany. afternoon and evening thunder-] six carloads ot Japanese po- K nouse ry Teton Park Ftancer in a !Nam and exclaimed, "Oh, as the cow and her calf emerged from a stand of narrow-leaf cot- tomvood about 350 yards away. A lover of nature who ofleni can presidential nominee Barry Said Mrs. Johnson of her American imperia Goldwater not earrv baid Mrs' of her American imperia- morc than e 2M .t-Hel in [K ttown Bot themselves as in- Novcmbereleclon dlCS 'ho Wnalion of lessons on geology, tcrnational policemen. This, he A lover of nalure McSfrmick appearing on and trees 'll "graphically, con- Tets Si2hVrt1lCr fhl Jexas ranch, Mrs, Johnson ob-lsaid Uie so-called "emotional iously was bi her element. Shelwhito backlash" sparked by sat astride the rubber siding oflrecent racial violence would les- i" "iv tiLnjiiL, uiiitwin, YiuiirijttJ Wuulu ICS- the K-fool-long boat, used iniscn as election day approaches World War II for landing troops He said Goldwatcr's an- and for bridge pontoons. It now is a tourist attraction in Grand Tcton National Park. "Oh, I loved Mrs, John- ion said when asked by Johnson. nounced policies will result in a "backlash (ho other with disappointed Republicans and independents supporting Presi- Sen. MeGee, and his wife raine, were hosts at a reception Sunday night in honor of the President's wife. Among the guests velopmenls and especially the air strikes in the Guif of Tonkin. "Acting as Khrushchev declared, 'The im- perialisl forces of the United >uu.jt >u> ui uiu uimcu VYIIVII 11 was ready wr ua Stales attacked (he Democratic hour flight lo Copenhagen. M arc againsl of (North) Vtel undeclared of South wa elect ernnr agansl of South (he Russians had was eected governor m vicl Nam and suppressing Ihesc U.S. passports. Earlier, how KAFT. 111 IT c i ______ _______ HAFT, Page 11) (people 2 Musicians Quit Soviet With Blast at Red Life "II is that tfic Iwo had en living in Russia not been granted asylum. Lo rest scattered. Thc boisterous teen-agers were among a crowd estimated by police at from to that attended a dance at tho Palm Gardens on West 52nil jStrcct. As Ihey spilled from Ihe dance- (hall al 3 a.m., several heaved a Informed sources said country of their choice. WKATI IRK lion, did nol want U> Inlk lo So-'crowd scattered. Jviel Embassy officials here, and' ere, an jvvere making the decision to fly! D r o Partly cloudy through West Germany of their Ol. h a nih with widl Al Anchorage, the Russians remained in seclusion during a 1-hour, 15-minutc refueling slop, They were accompanied by a man described by immigralion officials as a Central Intelli- gence Agency escorl from the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo. I 'J4A v-ajiuiui.-, ui to lhc air- r through Monday night. Thc twn nnd boen mcmhers of co.lim.ed" Simd'f lo Monday temperatures: Soulh Cenlral Texas: Parlly'jointly oudy Monday and (hey were defecting bo-idrv we'ither with widely scattered after-cau.sc of lack of freedom for the1 noon and evening thunder-'arLs in the Soviet Union and hadl u.Zhi .powers werejcported The Ihree went quickly inlo private office in thc customs i and immigralion section of thei, Sunday tcmpcraiurcs: High airjwrt lerminal building, rcfus- low 77- ing lo speak with reporters or allow their pictures to be taken. They reboarded tho plane when It was ready for Ihe 8'A- r- eiiu.se o lac o reeom or e r-'arLs in the Soviet Union and had USht imnAc (heir deckinn "a Uie d Jo.. UccLslorl a Centra tlma U.S. Embassy officials would neither confirm nor deny that the Russians had been given ever, a U.S. Embassy source high i day over Easl and Texas. Clear to itemcnt as skics Prevailed hy p0iit.c. jovcr Uie rest of thc stale. ,1 K la'i "Wc o' our own frccj Soaking rains thai brought ,m T lwi11 to lcavc Soviet four inches to some raa.m. (0 nsk he, f (h 0 started falling Friday ns lc o Barometric pressure al sea states government. We are mu-'" cool fronl moved across thc sicians and we want to be free stale. Ipvpl- 21 01 "i' laiuKijis drill we want lo oe irce hunset Monday sunrise in continuing our work in music. The U. S. Weather liureau luestia> lnc soviet Union, nil said Ihe cloudiness and showers t of art are guided polili-Would diminish hy Monday and victoria 'tally. We constantly receive the northern areas of Ihe weiUnr tiuniiejt, nji (Sec UH-'E. Page 11) Islato would be warmer.   

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