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Advocate Newspaper Archive: July 30, 1964 - Page 1

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Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - July 30, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                119th 84 TELEPHONE HI 5-1491 VICTORIA. TEXAS, THURSDAY. JULY 30, 1964 ESTABLISHED IMS General Pay Raise Planned by County EXPECT VITAL PHOTOS ARMY RESERVE ARMORY Work began Wednesday on Victoria's Army Reserve Armory, which is scheduled to open next Feb- ruary. Shown above is an architect's drawing of the building which will include an assembly hall of square feet, rifle range, kitchen, day room, arms vault, administration library, classrooms, locker rooms, and various storage areas. The armory will be located on property which the city acquired last year just off South Ben Jordan Street. Watkins To Ask Grand Jury For Hearing in Son's Case James Watkins, who claims his son was brutally beaten self. while handcuffed at police headquarters last month b u t was turned down by County Ally. W. W. Kilgore when he attempted to file charges, plans to take his argument before the Victoria County Grand Jury when it reconvenes on Aug. 24. Watkins' intentions to have the grand jury look into the matter were disclosed Wednes- day after a short meeling with Sheriff M. W. Marshal! in the latter's. office. "I want a better investigation than we have Watkins said, referring to a local probe report submitted by Police Chief John Guseman to Kil- gore on July 8. After studying the bulky report, Kilgore de- clined to accept1 an assault com- plaint against City Patrolman Gary Taylor. Walkins1 son, David, 18, was hospitalized on the morning of June 24 with a broken jaw, lac- erations around the chin, a fractured skull, according to the opinion of the attending physi- cian, eight teeth knocked out and 10 others chipped backhanded by Patrolman Tay- I6r. The officer claimed'hi act- ed in self-defense after being kneed in the groin. The youth had been arrested in the 300 block of East Brazos Street and was later charged with being drunk, disturbing the peace and malicious mis- chief. "We've had people calling us to know if we are giving up Watkins said Wednesday night Watkins added that he plans to hold off on civil court action until after the appearance be- fore the Grand Jury. He had earlier indicated that he would file civil action if Taylor was exonerated by the FBI report as he was in the local police investigation report. He added that he has been consulting with an out-of-town attorney. After the meeling at (he sher- Dems Name R igh ts Leaders fore the jury as well as him- iff's office Wednesday afternoon, Marshall said he will'c o n t a c t Walkins later as to Ihe day and lime that will be allotted for his appearance before the jury. He said Ihe jury case schedule lias yet to be worked out. Judge Joe E. Kelly recently called for the reconvening of the jury which was impaneled in May for the spring-s u m m e r term of court. He cited a heavy docket load as the reason for the jury recall. Kerry McCan Jr. is foreman of Ihe jury. j D. C. Girl Miss USA MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) shinning blue eyed blonde from the District of Columbia, 10-year-old Ilobhl Johnson, was crowned Miss USA Wednesday night. Thursday niglit, she will go up against entries from 58 foreign countries and IcrrUurirs in the firsl round of competition (or the Miss Universe tide. Miss Ji'lmson, a model wilb the eye-catching di- mensions of 35-22-35, de- feated a field of 15 finalists. A fall Texan. Diane Balloun, was first runner- up. Increases Of Proposed No Increase Due in'Paxes By HOY GRIMES 'Xllyocnl" Writer irauem cunucs; ui rcimnmg me tnc major problem of mulcourse Victoria County's proposed first close-up picliircs of un- maneuver and tlic vehicle now udgct for 1065, set off by known terrain where aslronnuls is cruising. We are studying to salary innronKes fnr mav land. Pastore as Keynoter WASHINGTON CAP) Detru crats picket] a fierv Johnsonian Sen. John 0. Pasl'ore of Rhod Island, as their keynote took a ginger ly approach lo what could b the most divisive row of th 1964 Democratic National Con van lion v This revolves around ftfe ques lion: should the convention sea an all-white delegation from Mississippi, sent by a state coi vention which has carefully le the door open to defection t Republican Sen. Barry Gold water? Or should it seal a delegalio: irom the predominantly Negr Democratic Freedom parly, ex peeled to back President John MlglH. 10 D3CK They have expressed wishesison to the hill? Cooling Maneuvers Apparently maneuvers aime us moral Watkins said he still thinks he will hear from the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice where a report was filed by two agents of the FBI who were called into Ihe case, with Watkin's approval bv Guseman. It slill isn't over by a long Watkins said in speaking or Ins plans to present the case to the Grand Jury. He said he plans to have David appear be- COHPUS CHRISTI (AP) Fellow peace officers elected Sheriff Ray Phagan of Perryton president of the Sheriffs Asso- ciation of Texas Wednesday Mrs. Hugh Strong of Charles ton, W. by long distance telephone wanting to be re membered to friends and neighbors, sounding a bit home sick for Victoria Polly I.anrton making sure a co-work er had transportation home Mrs. W. II. Arnold recovering from a slipped disc Bertha Griffith accused of being in an extravagant mood Freddie Mackreli trying to explain his early morning schedule Tom Land in town to do some banking Mrs. George Doberty being extra helpful. Madeline Solo prepared with an umbrella in case of showers Garland Rather proving to be a man of few words Eh-oy Brown telling about the latest book that interests him P. G. Williams venturing out in the heal of (lie day SKI. A. M. Woolley, formerly of Tripoli, Libya, and family vacationing here with his par- enls, Mr. and Mrs. Manuel Ktytt Mrs. Estelle Evans celebrating a birthday out for a stroll Crocker enjoying eating as much as ever while Ginger and Kalhy Matthews are still munching away on celery at cooling off this potentially bij Hiss were going on behind th scenes. For Chairman John M Bailey of the Democratic Na tional Committee was not pro pared to sav just when Ihe con vention's Credentials Commit tee, which will rule on the figh in the first instance, will hole its first meeting. The committee is headed by former Gov. David L Lawrence of Pennsylvania. II was indicat ed he would call meetings in Atlantic City sometime in the convention n T i y some Elm Leader week before the Robert GUI mighty sticks _____ _____ proud having picked" 78 pounds of cotton in one day. inc: opens there Aug. 24, but beyon thai Bailey said Ihe plans ha not jelled. Closed Session The convention Arrangements Committee held a closed session Wednesday, and then Bailey an nounced the choice of Paslorc as temporary convention chair man, or keynoter. Pastore will speak the nigh of Aug. 24, and if he follows tra cmion ho will, in his booming tones, find no fault with the (See DEMS, Page IDA) Coins Accounts Opened at Banks Victoria's Veteran of Forcigr Wars Post 4146 has opened ac counts al all four Victoria banks where donations may be made lo the James H. Coins fund. W. H. McMnnis, service of- ficer for the post, said the which had been donated by the post was broken down into accounts at all four banks in the city, and il was hoped lhat Victorians would contribule to the fund. Ten-year-old Jimmy Coins died of injuries received in the fire that leveled the family's home in La Ward (he night of July 7, and Mr. and Mrs. Coins and three-year-old Brcnda still remain in John Scaly Hospital in Galveston recovering from aurns. Coins, 3D, the principal of Ward Elementary School, a member of Ihe Lolila VFW Post, and other posts through- out this district are backing the campaign to help raise funds or the family, which lost all ts furnishings and clothes in he fire. Ask Race Truce NEW YORK nalion al civil righls leaders called Wednesday for a "broad curtail- ment, if not total moratorium" on all mass marches, picketing and other demonstrations unlil after the Nov. 3 presidential election. In a stalement following a two-hour civil righls "summit the leaders were cri- tical of Republican presidential candidate Barry Goldwalcr and called on Negroes to step up voter registration and political activity. "We believe lhat racism has been injected into the campaign by the Goldwater the statement said. "The senator, himself, mainlains his position lhat, civil rights mailers should be left to the states." They said that was 'clear e Votes Billion For Defense WASHINGTON (AP) The Senate voted Wednesday night to spend more than billion for defense. "We can't afford to be second Sen. Richard B. Russell, D-Ga., told his colleagues as he steered the measure to passage by the unanimous vote of 70 senators. Efforts to cut the money bill of the fiscal year, were turned back. A series of moves by senators anxious lo expand the government's ship- yards extended the debate to, McGovern, D- 3 D., complained of multimil- lion-dollar waste in recent mili- tary projects and soughl lo cut billion by an (Sec SENATE, Page 10A) j LEADERS, "page" IDA') enough language, for any Nsgro American." fn Washington, an aide said Goldwater would have no im- mediate comment Roy Wilkins, executive sccre- :ary of Ihe National Association tor the Advancement of Colored People, said Ihe statement could not be intcrpietcd as a pro- Johnson dociimonl, "There are a lot of Republi- cans we don't wanl lo see go down Ihe Wilkins lold newsmen. "We don't want to say that any good leader who lappens to be a Republican should be thrown out Ihe win- The statement described Ihe GOP platform as a "stale's and attributed 30 Cents PASADENA, Calif. (AP) ris Schurmeior, source of the 80 Ranger 7 cruised on course to- per cent estimate, told a news ward the moon Wednesday and conference at the Jet Propulsion lubilant scientists gave it an liO Laboratory: "We have passed chance of reluming Ihe the major problem of mulcourse budget f_____ pre-ycnr salary __ nearly all elected officials and a 10 per cenl across-lhe-board raise for all counly employes, was filed Wednesday wilh Coun- ty Clerk Val Huvar by Counly Auditor John C. Binnchi. Over all, Die salary increases will add approximately lo lie county's budget, and there will be an addilional increase of in the issuance of time warrants as part of the purchase price for Ihe city's half of Ihe courthouse block. These increases, wilh other minor adjustment, will account or mosl of the jump in the county's approved budgeted ex- penditures from in 19C4 to for 1965. No Tax Increase All of this will be accom- plished wilh no increase in the iresent counly tax rate of on the assessed valuation. The estimated total properly valuation for the county on 1964 taxes is an increase of over last year's val- uations. The salary increases for most of the elected county office-hold- ers, the first in four years, wil' run as follows: County Judge Wayne L. 'Hart- man, from to per year, .with an automobile allow- ance of per month. Counly Commissioners Pal Moore of Precinct 1, V. H, Web- er of Precinct 2, W. S. Caraway may land. vinn ullllv (YJIVJUIH UllML 15 il By 5 a.m. CST they said Ihe need tor a final maneuver about danger would be miles an hour before impact to train from earth, (raveling al cameras at the best angle." miles an hour. Director William 11. Pickering They predicted it will smash, of the laboratory, which made while (raveling miles an Ranger and is [racking it, hour, Into Ihe Sen of Clouds al agreed with Schurmeicr's odds, a.m. CST on Friday. vii IIIHJ uiit luuiuu. i iiui t; aliii is liiilt If all goes well Ihe space- critical moment when we have craft's six television cameras to order the spacecraft lo turn will return more than on its television photographs in the final 13 min- utes before pro- vide the firsl success in the trouble-plagued, Ui- lar exploration program, Hanger project manager Har- ui ui J i i( --uiu of Precinct 3 and Frank Earned f''om fne chapel and of Precinct 4, from to---- per year, also wilh an allowance of per month. Roost lor Sheriff Sheriff M. W. Marshall, from to per year. Tax Assessor-Collector H. Campbell Dodson, from o year. Counly Clerk Val Huvar, from to per year. County Ally. Whayland W Kilgore, from >er year. md these yet increases will now up lo Ihe limit fixed law. IMS uson; our ro Ihe nroijonenls of Imoraliz- of increase to be given Counly ers, Robert. Emil M J and ng the civil righls planks of Ihe Treasurer G. Lucchese, now re- C. I. Tibiletti, all of Victoria (Sec HAISE. Page 10A) Exchange Student Finds Victoria a Tine' Place Lunar Craft on Course, Success Nearly Certain determine whether Ihcre is a bul added: "There slill Is that When the critical moment came for the predecessor Ran- ger 6, Ihe cameras (ailed. The Sea of Clouds is a wide plain on the moon's lighted side, it was dubbed More Nobium A. J. Tibiletli, 65, vice-prcsi- denl of Firsl Victoria National Bank who was scheduled to re- tire at the end of this year, died at a.m. Wednesday In a local hospital. Rosary will he recited at' 8 p.m. Thursday at MeCabc-Car- rulh Funeral Home Chapel and services will be held Friday 'al al a.m. from St. Mary's Calholic Church where he was a member. The Rt. Rev. Msgr. F. 0. Beck will officialo at a Requiem High Mass, and burial will be in .cry. Born in Victoria County Feb. 14, 1899, Mr. Tibilclti was the Cli son of Joseph and Felina Pozzi Wednesday night. Tibiletti. He joined First Vieto- .A. of tllc vland W Jomed First Vieto- "e mei to OOM ria Nillional Bank in lm icked her up in Houston Tues- ay, and spent most of Wednes- ay showing their new guest the ity. The lour included a visit to ister M. Michael, principal at vazarelh Academy, who showed ler about the school grounds nd gave her a brief idea of vhol to expect when classes lart Aug. 29. Victoria Is somewhat different )an Rome, a cily of two mil- on, Angela pointed out, but it a very much as she had it pic- (See STUDENT, P.ge THE GIRL FROM ITALY Connie Ayo, left, shows her now guest, Angela Tavelli of Rome, what to expect when school opens at Nazareth Academy with the help of the school yearbook. Angela will spend the nexl year with the C. J. Ayo family as a participant in the Inlernalional High School Student Program sponsored by the Catholic Welfare Conference. (Advocate Photo) wo sisters, Mrs. Charles Schi anni and Miss Anne Tibilelli o Vicloria; and cighl grandchil Iron: AH Local Banks Close For Rites Victoria hanks will remain closed Friday until 12 noon in respect for Mr. A. J. Tibilctli, veteran officer of First Victoria National Bank who died Wednes- day al a.m. Spokesmen for all four loca, banks said lhal all public bank- ing services, including drive- in banking, will be hailed be- tween Ihe regular opening hours and 12 noon. WASHINGTON (AP) The House passed legislation Wednesday that would give a 5 per cenl raise to the 20 million THE WEATHER Partly cloudy Thursday morn- ing through Friday with a few widely scattered daytime show- ers. Daytime winds from south lo southeast al 8 to 18 m.p h Expected Thursday tempera lures: High 94, low 76. South Central Texas: Partly cloudy and hot through Friday wilh widely scaltered showers, mosl numerous near coasl. Hfghs Thursday 88 lo 100. Wednesday temperatures: High 88, low 7fi. Tides (Porl L a v a c a-Porl Highs at a.m. and p.m. Lows al 3.m. Thursday and a.m. Friday. Baromclric pressure al sen cvel: 20.95. Sunset Thursday: Sun- rise Friday: Thli Inrormillon band on data -Pom U.S. Victoria Olllci. Monday night. Another joinl meeting is to he called next week, although the exact date is still uncertain, Ron aid R. Peck, board presi- dent, said Monday nighl. Hoard members and Bnoslcr members plan to do as much (Sec STADIUM, Page 10A) Today's Chuckle Scicnlisls trl! us that we arc taller In (he morning Mian we arc in the evening. Mosl of us have noticed, loo, that we're sliurlcr around Mir end n{ llic monlli. HOUSE ACTION Social Security Hike To 20 Million Voted widows and children who re- ceive Social Security payments. A 388-8 roll call vote sent the >il! lo llic Senate. If the Senate approves Ihe measure, Ihe additional bens- fits estimated to tolal mil- ion annually will begin flowing two months after the bill is signed. To pay for them, an increase n Social Security payroll taxes, nilially a hike of as much as ing years bul not enough under present rules [o qualify for re- tirement. The bill would pro- vide a new minimum payment retired or disabled workers, of a month under liberalized niles estimalcd to make persons, mostly women, eligi- ble. In addition, the coverage af- forded children of deceased workers would be extended be- yond the present 18-year cutoff age (or young people continuing Iheir education. They would continue lo receive payments while in school or college up to age 22. It was estimated this iiui.tiiij u ui aa uiuuu as was I'MIHIUICU S3I.20 a year each for employ- change would add lo the ers and employes, would go into rolls and result in million effect Jan. I. However, some senators plan o try lo write into the bill a 'crsion of the health plan for he aged favored by President Such a move, if suc- cessful, coiiltl lead to a .SeniUe- louse fight wilh unpredictable a year payments. Another change would extend Social Security coverage lo 000. doctors of medicine and in- ternes, described as the last large occupational group not covered. thcj session. Besides raising benefits, cgislalion would add present ind future beneficiaries lo the Social Security system which ow covers nearly all Amerl- ans privately employed. The largest group would Isl of persons ,iow in their r older who had paid, or whose ircadwinncrs had paid, some Ihorized lo join Ihe system, if (Sec HIKE, Page IDA) INDEX Social Security lax during work< Dralhi .....Ill r.rffiorta] .....M (iorrn ....IU Sporli ....HA TV .....M I9A IA sn 1 Ml -ISA   

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