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Advocate: Tuesday, July 28, 1964 - Page 1

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - July 28, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 82 TXLXPHONI HI H4S1 VICTORIA, TEXAS, TUESDAY, JULY 28, 1964 ESTABLISHED 12 Cents MEET A. E. TORRES Mrs. Benilo A. Torres of Austwell proudly dis- plays A. E. Torres one, two and three. Mr. and Mrs. Torres decided to name each of the triplets so their initials would be identical. The first triplets bo-rn in Champ Traylexr Memorial Hospital in Port Lavaca, EVOLUTION IRE Letter Barrage Opposes Texts they are, left to right, Marcus Ar- turo, G pounds 2 ounces; Mario Al- berto, B pounds 5 ounces, and Miguel Antonio, 6 pounds 5 ouncs. They were born Saturday at and p.m., respectively. (Advocate Photo) AUSTIN (AP) The Texas Education Agency is receiving a barrage of tellers and peti- lions opposing adoption of Ihree biology texlbooks which discuss Hie Iheory of evolution. Dallas, El Paso, Abilene, Lub- sock and Austin. The letters contend lhat leach- ing of the theory of evolution conflicts with Ihe religious doc- trines of Ihe resurrection of Ihe About 50 letters on the subject soul and the creation of the went to Gov. John Connally, whose office sent them on to the education agency. "The loiters and petitions seem to come primarily from one source. Church of Christ said J. B. Golden, head of the agency's textbook divi sion. The books, up for adoption this fall by the state textbook com- miltee and Ihe Stale Board of Education, are "High School Bi- "Biological Science: An Inquiry into Life" and "Biolog- Molecules tc the lellers are worded similarly and "seem lo be A form letter." He said they have been mailed from through- out Texas including Fort Worth, ica! Science: Man." Golden said world by God. Golden said the letters and petitions will be forwarded to the state texlbook committee for their consideration. The commillee recommends lo the state board books for adoption for use in the state's public schools. A hearing will be held Oct. 14 lo air formal pro- tests to any book under consid- eration. Organized opposition has ap- peared from time to time in re- cent years to proposed book adoptions, mainly history and civics texts. Conservative groups protested several books in 19G1 on grounds they were critical of capitalism and stress- ed excessively the idea of equal Funds for Coaches7 Trip Refused at Bloomington Coaches of Bloomington In- dependent School District were refused funds to attend the Texas High School Coaches As- meeting in w e e k at a meeting of the Board of Educa- tion Monday night. Alvin A .Wynn made the mo- tion, afler a discussion, that Hie board authorize the coaches to attend, and pay their own ex- socialion annual Fort Worth next Mrs. Clarence Atzcnhoffcr re- porting temperatures of 108 de- grees in Marlin and looking for- ward to "cool" Victoria when she arrives home this week Ronnie Williams of Goliad town on business in Johnny lleihel of Fleming Prairie pre- dicting it is likely to gel hotter before summer is over Troy Aufrcy getting in a visit along with a shoe shine Albert Pcnninglon in town from Sea- drift and the conversation shift- ing to hunting and fishing the L. L. Smoliks of Corpus Christi in town for a vacation the A. G. Schroeders off for a two weeks vacation to Col- orado and New Mexico Shearn Moody of Galveston a guest of the Henry Clay KoonU family on the HK Ranch the H. II. Robertsons of Hous- ton in town to sec the Dwlght lenses, wilh the board lo repay ;ach of them afler the new budget goes into effect Aug. 1. Gulhrie J. Sklar seconded :he motion, but it was defeated uy James K. Garner, James K Lewis, and Quincy 0. Thomp- son. James E. Hilscher, boari vice president who presided in (he absence of President Ron aid R. Peck, did not vole in this or olher aclions during the evening. All board members indicalc( lhat they heartily favored hav ing the coaches attend. Gam cr indicated, however, that he didn't favor spending money in advance. Supl. Paul J Lewis, lold board members lhal tie believed such aclion to be perfectly legal, but the vote defeating the motion followed Lewis said that the athletic fund at present has only abou which is needed to pay athletic insurance before th first football game of the sea on. Lewis pointed out, too, tha the athletic fund is not thi only one short of cash. He sai y money in the budget ear- marked for radio replacements, 5-Year Lease The council cancelled a five- year lease with U.S. Cold Slor- ige for a pier lo be constructed ipon submerged land within Lynn's Bayou Turning Basin jranted July 17, because the J.S. Engineers questioned the 'easibility of the project. The lease, subject to a permil 'or ils construction being granted by Ihc Engineers ant heir continued maintenance of Cily Harbor, carried Iwo five year renewal options on a Irac iO feet wide by 60 feel long The pier was lo be used foi lurpose of selling ice lo the pub Kncroaclinioiit Col. John E. Unverferlh, dis Radiology Schoo Registration Set Registration for (he free four day school lo train instructor in radiological monitoring be gins at 8 a.m. Tuesday in the home economics cottage at Vic loria College with the first class following, reports George Fillcy Civil Defense director. All interested persons am especially representatives o city, county, state and federa agencies or other groups an urged to enroll, he said. Upon completion of the course sludenls will become instructors and will be qualified lo lead future radiological monitoring courses in Victoria and Ihe sur rounding area, .rict engineer, in a letter o: explanation to Cily Managei Herman Ladewig, stated the proposed pier encroached on a portion of the lurning basin maintained under an authorizec (Sec PORT, Page 10) Viet Nam Promised More Aid American Role Remains Same SAIGON, South Viel Nam government an- nounced Monday night lhat the United States has agreed to in- crease immediately the number of military and civilian advisers in this war-torn country and to send additional equipment. The wording of the announce- ment made it clear the new American aid would be of the same type it has been since 19C1, although greater in quanti- ty. No new combat role was fore- seen for the American troops, who would continue to serve as advisers and in supporting roles. Gradual Buildup Neither the Vietnamese gov- rnment nor U.S. officials would say how many new U.S. person- nel are expected hero. A U.S. spokesman said, however, that the arrival of personnel would be gradual, and the number now planned might be changed with developing circumstances. The announcement followed conferences between Premier Nguyen Khanh and U.S. Ambas- sador Maxwell D. Taylor. In Washington, indications were that the augmentation of U.S. personnel eventually might amount to several thousand but something less than the mentioned in some reports. Same System The additional personnel, it vas understood, would not be sent as combat-type units, bill vould go as individuals or small groups of specialists, techni- cians, combat advisers and rainers. This is the system al- ready used in the Viet Nam pro- >ram. The communique declarer .hat "this increase in U.S. aid as well as other aid from friend- y countries granted at the re- quest of the Vietnamese govern ment should be construed as a warning to the Communists in Hanoi (capital of North Vic "The Free World 'has decided to help the Vietnamese govern ment and Vietnamese people to fight for.freedom and indepen dence. Besides, it should not be forgotten that this aid is a de monstration of U.S. dctormina lion to supply everything neces sary to our fight. The Republic of Viel Nam is glad to accep (his act of the U.S. govern ment." Adviser Increase The communique listed foul areas where U.S. aid would b elieve and know that this hap- >ened. And the Soviet Union also knows il. "If another of our men is mur- dered we will not have another alternative but to answer shot 'or shot independently of what :he American government be- ieves or not." In answer lo a queslion at a rambling 3'A-hour news confer- ence, Caslro said in any possi- )le Cuban action at Guantana- mo "the Soviet Union knows if we are forced to take measures we would not be looking for arms." When asked about a possiblity of meeting wilh Presidcnl John- son or olher American officials, Castro rejected Ihc idea saying, 'il is impossible to think about such a meeting al a high level." Referring to the nominalion of Sen. Barry Goldwatcr ot Arizo- na as the Republican nominee for president, Caslro said "Re- publican and Democratic ad- ministrations have- been s." In reference to Cuban aid lo clher Latin-American revotu- ionary governments, Caslro said, "Cuba has never admitted officially that it has ever given material aid to them." He said Cuba "will supporl only those movements in coun- ries which do nol respect our sovereignly." Asked if such aid would include armaments, Cas- lro said Ihc kinds and quantities of such aid "will depend on the ;ircumstances and Ihe form and dnits of our resources ant (See CASTRO, Page 10) Cotinly Court Rescl The County Court session scheduled for Tuesday morning has been reset for 1C a.m. Thurs day, County Clerk Va! D. Huvai said Monday. Jurors need no report until Thursday, he added CONFUSING TRADE THE WEATHER Partly cloudy and continued hot Tuesday through Wednes- day with southeasterly winds 5 to 15 m.p.h. Expected Tuesday lemperalures: High 100, low 75. South Central Texas: Clear (o parity cloudy and continued hoi Tuesday and Wednesday with isolated afternoon and evening (hundcrshowers main- ly north. High Tuesday 02-102. Temperatures Monday: 09, low 75. High Tides (Porl Lavaca-Porl O'Connor Lows al p.m. and p.m. Tuesday with highs at p.m. Tuesday and a.m. Wednesday. Barometric pressure at sea level: 29.92. Sunset Tuesday Sunrise Wednesday Thfs information bjied on data from Iho U.S. Wtalhcr Bureau Victoria Otttc.. lominanlly Negro Bedford-Sluy csant secllon of Brooklyn. Uioling and looting plaguei >oth areas last week, causint one dealh, hundreds of injuric and arrests and more than million in properly damage. As Uie Iwo Negro comnum .les returned lo normal Monday the slate, supreme court conlin lied a bun againsl Harlem dc monslratlons by Iwo militni Negro groups and Ihcir lender: The ban was Issued again: Jesse Gray, head of Ihc Com munlty Council for Housing, an Epton and his Harlem Dcfcns Council. Epton was ancsled Salurdu for attempting to conduct march in Harlem in defiance i a police department ban. Justice Gerald A. Culkin sa he would hear a motion Tuesda for a temporary Snjunclio againsl the demonstrations. In another outgrowth of th racial violence, the Toamslcr Union ordered an embargo o all liquor deliveries by ils men hers lo Harlem and the Bcelfort Stuyvesant area unlil Ihc pe sonncl can he guaranteed safe ty. Meanwhile, as calm returnee lo the riot areas, civil right leaders continued lo press Waj, ncr for the dismissal of Polic Commissioner Michael .1. Mm phy. Leaders In Ihe Negro commi nily and some whiles bav urged lhat invcsllgallons of p lice brutality charges be lurnc over to civilians rather than r main in the hands of the depar ment. Murphy opposes such move. It was the falal shooting of 15-year-old Negro boy by while policeman lhal scl off In racial slrife. Area Scouts Report On National Jamboree Scoulmasler W. II. (Doe) Slcele almost refused to feed one of his coastal area Boy Scouts at the National Boy Scout Jamboree one day last week. When the boy came back from a trading session, Steele didn't recognize him. After all, as Steele says, it's not often lhal you see a Texas Seoul in a Canadian uniform. Luckily, Ihc Corpus Christ! youngster had another uniform of his own style. The 37 Scouts from the De- Leon and Indlanola districts and the thousands of olhcrs there spent a lot of spare time swap- ping a vast variety of ilems ranging from horned toads to lhal uniform. The area Scouts spent, a Healthful lime at Valley Forge, Pa., bul other troops were not always so forlunalc. One of .the }lg problems was a beetle that found Scout cars a pleasant place to seek refuge from all Ihe encroaching activity in his otherwise serene habitat. "We solved the beetle prob- lem by having Ihe boys pul col- ton in Ihcir cars." Unfortunately, before Ihe so- lution, some troops lost mem- bcrs lo the field hospital um a drop of ether deadened t! bug enough to accomplish 1 evacuation. None of the Sou Texas group bagged a bee' and no accidents occurred. The troop of area boys had 100 per cent record of parli palioa in all regular even They included rife and ske shooting, fly fishing, tours Ihe Washington Monument ai Memorial Chapel, making tl obstacle course and a soil co servalion program. Also, cat Scout had lo obtain 25 nam of others, including 10 from fo elgn countries. Each area be received'a Jamboree award f nol missing any porlion of program. The Scouts visited the World Fair, where (heir (ravelin icckcrchicfs with Trail of S Klags emblems made them cas to distinguish from others (See AREA, Page 10) INDEX Abby CrtmworiJ Womea'fc -----3 Drittht S Fdllorlal Z Gorcn 10-11 1 iutside .interests Are Issue Ethics Panel Study Asked WASHINGTON eualo rejected Monday nighl a roposal that would have re- ilrcd senators and top Senate nployes lo disclose llieir out- :le financial intcresls. But Ihe chamber said it fa- ored establishing a commis- on to study how to prevent onflicls of inlcresl among all xleral employes, By a vole of -18-39, il adopted a otion of Sen. Everett M. Dirk- en, U-lll., lo send the proposed ii mid a I disclosure rule back lo ommilleo. Along with Ihe easure, the Senate attached nslruclions lhat the committee !port soonest on Ihc possibility a 17-member commission on lilies in the government, linker E'robc The rulo that would require enntors and aides lo dlsctoso unually oulsidc money Inler- sts had been recommended by IB Senate Hulcs Committee In report on ils Bobby Baker in- cstlgallon. The commission measure ould have to be approved by le House as well as the Senate nd be signed by President ohnson. The Senate, however, could lave amended ils own rules to equire disclosure ot outside in- eresl by senators and em- ployes. Dirksen Protests Dirksen, the Senate Republi- can loader, protested strongly againsl singling out the Senate or action lo safeguard againsl conflicts of Inlcresl or other im- irpprieties. 'We've demeaned ourselves ong all over one 'alien he said in ref- erence lo Baker, who resigned indcr fire lasl fall as secretary o (he Senate Democratic ma- ority. The proposed commission on ethics, armed wilh subpoena lowers, would be composed of rour senators, four House mem- icrs, and nine persons appoint- ed from private life by the pres- dent. Complete Study It would be directed to make 'a full and complete study and nvestlgalion" to determine the ncasures necessary to insure he observance of high ethical standards by federal officers and employes in all branches of he government. The commission could recom- mend measures for the disclo- sure of private financial Inter- ests as well as oilier steps to prevent conflicts of interest. The vote marked (he second upset by the Senate of the rules committee's recommendations after ils politically explosive >robc of Baker's money-making (Sec SENATE, Page 10) Texan Jailed After Threat HOUSTON Serv- ice agents arrested Arthur Do- vall Goodrum, 18, of Cleveland Tex., Monday on a charge of threatening the life of President Johnson. Lane Bertram, Secret Service agenl, said Ihe unemployed man was apprehended at the home of his mother in Cleveland. Goodrum was arraigned be- fore U. S. Commissioner Ralph Fowler in Houston, and ordered held In the Harris County (Hous- ton) jail in lieu of bond. The threat on Johnson's life came during a political conver- sation with an unidentified city councilman in Conroe, Tex., April 7, Bertram said. Goodrum had Ihurnbed a ride with the councilman to Cleve- land that day and Ihey began discussing politics. Bertram said Goodrum bo- came exited, blamed Johnson 'or Ihc "Smith's problems" and said he would kill the President if he got a chance. "I have a gun at home lo do it Bertram quoted Ihe man as saying. Bertram said the man idenli- ,0 ficd himself as a "Southerner segregationist." The 6-1, 240-pound Goodrum sought Sunday. Bertram isald.   

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