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   Advocate (Newspaper) - July 16, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 70 TELEPHONE HI VICTORIA, TEXAS, THURSDAY, JULY ESTABLISHED IMS 34 Cents Gold water Wins GOP Nomination With Sweeping First-Ballot Victory Cbuneil Asked to Personal Auto Tax By TOM FITE Advocate SlafI Writer Victoria Cily Council was asked by its board of lax equali- zation Wednesday to eliminate tax assessments on all personal automobiles. The unanimous request by the board of equalization for council action was released by Chair- man J. E. Weathcrly Jr. al the end of the scheduled Iwo days I five years ago to collect aulo- homestead property, Davis said, far as the sec- concerned, il's lo collect of tax hearings. Wcatherly said Ihe board made the recommendation for three reasons: i. the revenue from this source is negligible, 2. 'it is an unfair lax" in that only about 60 per cent of auto- mobile owners pay the tax, and 3. it is a practical impossibility to collect from those who do not pay voluntarily. Simultaneously, ly said that the Weather- Iwo days of rery fair and ihe pea hearings al City Hall have pro- duced a minimum of lax com- plaints. "I want to say lhat the city tax and valuation department has done a wonderful job ol equalizing taxes, and because ol Ihis we have had a very easy Weatherly said. Asked specifically about, pos sible complaints from the area along North Navarro Street where Assessor-Collector Tom L: Davis previously had an nounced valuation increases Weatherly said "vfe had one' complainant Wednesday. "After we showed him lhat the city actually purchased prop erly in Ihe area al the figure he was assessed, he was Weatherly said without naming the taxpayer. "We haven't had any trouble in that area because the valua lions are ver; pie know The board interviewed 21 tax payers Wednesday, after having heard 43 persons on tax matters Tuesday. Turning back lo aulomobili taxes, Weatherly said it shouli be emphasized, that Ihe recom niendalion applies "lo persona cars only, and not to Iruck fleet, and other commercial vehicles. Questioned about the propos al, Davis said (hat he concurs with Ihe concensus expressed b the equalization board. "It is a very unpopular Davis said. "A high least 50 per cent or more o all our complaints in the tax office concern the automobili taxes." Davis said lhat "only belweei and (in aclua assessments) is on the rolls, ant wo collect only about 60 pe cent of lhat" each year. At th maximum figure, Ihis wouli mean lhat Ihe city realizes onl about income from auto mobile taxes. Under the leadership of the Trustee Richard Henderson, Vic toria Independent School Dis trict led a determined fight by! school, city and county officials' mobile laxes. This led to that of hundreds of lax suits, car is subsequent awarding of mat ments in favor of the of UIE agencies in many family" Asked about these a tax ju Wednesday, Davis said lhat is beca still have 20 to 25 judgments Weathc he books, and we've never imp< ecled a the ur Collection can be made on automobi udgments only by an unf ion-exempt property, and anotl Texas law a homestead, lhat undc first automobile, up to ta worth of home furnishings, applies virtually everything else that or less. person may own is aga This would mean that the a 10-ye would have to attach real We other than a homestead or ex second family automobile a order to colled on the Auto "t Most people own only 1 MAYOR'S Given Three members of will whi 2ity Council said they will vote in favor of a expected proposal from statemenl Kemper Williams Jr., lo sell that "1 city's north half of a y square lo Victoria time." Councilwoman Bea conf who has been the most suppor en critic of the projected left c previously, said that she vote for the proposal virtua certain points" not Mon in Williams' statement last off day "are clarified and the the fi One of these, she said, be a proposal to combine "not lo be hall, police and jail facilities he a new municipal building to of constructed al the site of posit ent City Hall. She and are in "agreement on this a plac Mrs. Martin said, but added ag r than oh the thing i. simply be nice I >wden said he feel best solution thai i up with is much tl thai the mayor ha that the recenl an its concerning ou in our city govern Cowden's statemcn Worrying Southerners Vole Split Possibility ATLANTA, Ga. eorge C. Wallace of Alabama, vho said he "shook lhe eye- eeth" of Northern liberals in residential primaries, now has pme of his Southern conserva ives worrying about their eye eeth in the presidential clcc- ion. Despite Republican warnings if a serious Southern vote split f he slays in the race, Wallace ;aid Tuesday nighl in Little thai he was staying Some, of his supporters fear hat Wallace will divide the con ervalive vote with Sen. Barry joldwnler, R-Ariz., and deliver he Soulh lo President Johnson Threaten Stales Defections from lhe Wallaci :amp, in light pf the GOP plat orm and Goldwater's popular! y, are beginning or threatening n some of the slates where the Overnor plans to run. In othoi tales, backers are ticking tightly to Wallace. An indication of the feeling on Vallace-Goldwater came Iron ;ames H. Gray of Albany, Ga. newspaper publisher and form er stale Democratic chairman. "I think the Republican plal orm will be very appealing to and the Gra, said. "As far as Georgia is con cerned, I think this knocks out s third parly." 'Weakens Location' A Wallace backer, Fred Han of one considering1 a Wallace slale i Georgia, said there was a poss bility the dissidents would go fo Goldwafer GOP pla form weakens our "One of the bjg fears he said, "is that Wallac will divide the vote and defea Goldwater." Another indication of the co; s e r v a t i v e Ihinking cam Wednesday in Soulh Carolin when Parley Smilh of Lynch burg, head of an independen Democrats' group, threw hi support lo the Republicans an endorsed Goldwater. Met Wilh Wallace Smith, who met last mont with Wallace, said thai if In GOP had nominated Gov. Wi liam W. Scranton of Pennsy vania and adopted an ullraliber al platform, then very likely th Soulh Carolina group woul have supported Wallace. In Wisconsin where Wallac polled a sizable primary voli (See WALLACE, Page 14) lissident Democrats go along with SUN. BARRY GOLDWATER Republican choice Miller Tabbed For No. 2 Spot COW PALACE, San Francisco Miller had said he was will- (AP) Sen. Barry Goldwater, rich, conservative grandson of an immigrant peddler, captured ;he Republican presidential nomination Wednesday night with a first-ballot triumph as smashing as it was expected, The call of the roll of delegates turned up 883 votes for Goldwalcr, 2M for Seranlon, and odds and ends for favorite son nominations. It took 055 to win and the magic number turned up wlien South Carolina cast its ballot. So confident was Goldwaler of [lie dead certain outcome lhat lie let it be known before the voting that he had decided on a man for second place on the ticket. The convention chairman, Thruslon B. Morion of Kentucky gave newsmen tho name: Rep. William E. Miller of New York the -parly's retiring natlona chairman. Further Expansion Eyed By School Building Panel The proposed elementary school for Highland Estates is lot yet on the drawing boards, >ut plans are already being dis- cussed lhat may triple it in The five-man building c o m- mittee'of the Victoria Independ- ent School District's Board iol Trustees met Wednesday to dis- cuss projected classroom needs and one of the ilems discussec he school from eighl rooms, as >resently planned, lo an even- ,ual 24 rooms. was the possibility of increasing ibly be offered lo the v o t e r s ometime in 1965. The Highland Estates silc ha not yet been definitely pickcc Also discussed was Ihe poss- ns lhe choice for Iho new ele ibilily or adding 16 new class- mcnlary school, although Boar rooms at Dudley Elementary President A. T, Ragnn said a School, and Ihe construction of icr UIB meeting Wednesday tha an entirely new eight Hrqom it was bQt.. elementary ..school. All projects (he outcome of a survey bein would be financed by a school conducted by Archllcct Arch which would prob- Young. The hoard at its rcgula Return of Grand Jury Ordered on August 24 Today's Chuckle The person who has every- thing should he quarantined. Veteran Employe Elevated To Airport Manager Here Bill Sparks reminding board members of Die Executives Din- ner Club of a meeting at 12 noon today al lhe Tolah's Molel Restaurant Mrs. George Smajslrla out attending a 4-H function after a three weeks bout wilh the mumps Oscar JUigl having trouble gelling or- ganized, what with all of his automobile failures Mrs. Judy Erwln discouraged over her gardening aspects Jim- my Hauschild proving that he was a msn of his word Howard Blerley making plans for a vacation in the South E. R. Lichnovsky admitting that he was having an unusually busy day Mrs. George Needham reminding members of Past President's Club to call her for reservations for Ihe luncheon slated Monday at p.m. Mrs. Jo Fuliick having problems with missing harmless lizards, which did show up Harry Utboff enjoying the change of pace this summer as instructor at Victoria College Dave Sheffield doing his good deed for the day .Mrs. R. H. Lamey getting ready for a regular meeting of Violet Chap- ter, Order of Eastern Slar at 8 tonight at Masonic Hall, George Reese, an employe of Victoria County Airport for the past 10 years, was officially named manager at a meeting of the Airport Commission Wednesday afternoon at F i r s t Victoria National Bank. Reese succeeds A. J, Prevost, who died June 7. The appoint- ment was effective as of July L Al last month's meeting of Ihe. commission, he requested lhe commission not to consider him for the manager's post, but said Wednesday he later "changed my mind." Herndon Scott, commission member who presided al the meeting, pointed out that Reese was the second person employed by lhe Vicloria County Airporl Commission when operation of the airport was removed from the jurisdiction of Uie County Commissioners. Reese went to work for the airport Aug. 1, 1954, as a main- tenance specialist. He pointed out Thursday that much of the work is maintenance. He worked at Aloe Field for the first sev- Field in the spring of 196! when lhe county airport was moved lo Foster. A native of Waynesburg, Pa., Reese worked in various other v; GEORGE REESE stales including Virginia, up- eral years, moving to Foster slale New York and Louisiana. He spent four years in the Army, two of which were spent show hazardous. operator, a requiremenl for the position since Foster Field has its own wells, water plant and pumping system. His wife Virgie is employed at Twin Pines Resl Home on lhe field. Their Iwo sons, Larry 16, and George Lynn, 14, bolh will attend Victoria High School this fall. The family has living quarters at the field. In other business at the com- mission meeting, members for- mally turned down a request by Victoria Jaycees to stage anolh- er Airport Holiday w i c h the Jaycees sponsored last summer. Lynn Roloff, Dick Zeplin Jr. and Will Armstrong appeared Jcfore lhe board in connection wilh the request. Holoff offered a plan in which he said traffic congestion would. be less, and more control exercised over crowds attending such an event. Roger Ilamel, board member, explained the commission's po- licy on such events, noling thai the lack of a control tower, and the serious problems lo han- dling a crowd of that .size (an eslimaled were on the field) made holding such a Instructing a small arms school at Fort Bennlng, Ga. He is a licensed .water plant H. T. (Slim) Furry, air scry. Ice operator, told the commiS' MANAGER, Page 15) Dist. Judge Joo Kelly felony cases filed before call for 11 an order Wednesday calling of Iho Peace Alfred phaso, usii the reconvening on Aug. 24 including a murder by the 1062 the Victoria County aforethought beginning o Mrs. Deity Lou Kelly said the jury will of S. Mantz additions called in session lo Jackson, accused of by a n felony cases filed since the Mrs. Lorcna Thompson, said. meeting in the early part of next door neighbor, is addition May, Al thai lime, lhe free on and eigh jury was empaneled for Thompson died on May would rr spring-summer courl term a local hospital from a new clcmen holds jurisdiction until sustained in a fighl the proposed ber. 10. Mrs. Jackson, a new inleri Since then, there have charged with "pounding school is Phony Mrs. Thompson's hea( against the ground. Kerry McCan Jr. is included in although Iho b tee has taken Slow the jury. Other members are C. L. DuBose Jr., James L. Another mi lor Wednesday Mrs. William S. Fly, of 11 SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -They closed the gates at the -ow Palace late Wednesday Nelson Panlel, W. D] Holzheuser, L. J. Gilberl, Manuel F. Reyes, J. D. Cohen, C. M. Artero, Hober Conde Anderso for an hour or hundreds of people, including Wearden and John PAN1' gates, oulside waving md badges and shouting, "What's going What was going on at Republican National Conven-ion, explained Battalion Fire Chief Frank Spccht and Wife Alexander, Daly City, Calif., fire department, was this: Too many people. Demonstrators who were Sheppard posed to exit after a Ohio will i period allowed (or cheering Sheppard, convicted candidate, didn't. They was ordered lawyer a on and from Ohio lhe slale h A rash of counlerfeit by a federal judge of r that got people inside, but he had been denied his expects lo 1 no seat for rights for a fair lo recoup THE -Dist. Judge Carl A. Weinman ordered the release under bond. He said indignation accusation and of Incarceration Clear to partly cloudy custody is and il Cuyahoga County or the said th be brought aga Thursday night with a few no action within GO the pe ated afternoon release becomes the accusal Winds southeasterly 8 lo state officials said m.p.h. Expected Thursday mean lhat had his cii peratures: High 98, low be released his convt South Central Texas: Clear to partly cloudy Thursday and go to Cleveland lo appear in Common Pleas Court even day with widely scattered (o selling a dale Court, ly afternoon and even new now. showers mainly east. High Thursday 94 to Boston, Shcppard's attorney, F. Lee Bailey, said Alty. Gen reached In San Temperatures come lo Columbus is attending High 9fi, low arrange for ball Conv Tides (Port Lavaca-Por O'Connor area) Lows' al Sheppard lo would ap man's decision a.m. p.m. and said he would Cleveland, at a.m. If a retrial were Prosecutor Barometric pressure al s e but expressed he would level: case would never go to to pr Sunscl Thursday in a second He sai Friday said he doesn't "makes Thu infurmatJon based on data from the U.S. Weather Bureau Victoria stale will appeal Judge Weinman's order. If II docs, "He was wr UMirkwt, the Circuit Courl oli (See monthly meeting Monday signed Young lo study problem of water and sewage disposal the site. When first -proposed lo vo ers in the 10G2 school b o n eleclion, the school was plannc as an eight-room unit. Curren would he f new bond issue mean a total o (junio actio Gorrard an uphold the dec of a wrongi the U.S. S said h John Corrig a hash of ji Never In Uoiilil Never for n moment, tn its lional convention or in lhe onths before, had the GOP d any intention other lhan to its standard into the mis of lhe Arizona senator lo rry lhe 19G4 political wars ainst President Lyndon B. hnson. Down lo a bilter, crushing de- al wenl Gov. William W. ranton of Pennsylvania. From e start of a belated, futile Iz attempt against Goldwater ranton's campaign had been nned more to prayers and inciplcs than to the realities practical politics. Congratulates Barry Immediately after lhe ballot, ran ton came before lhe con- ntion in a unity and harmony esluie to declare that "lo lhe clor I extend my very warm ongratulatlons." Wo must now be about lhe isiness of -defeating Demo- lhe governor said. Scranlon promised lo work >r and fully support the ticket loscn by lhe convention, edging to campaign on every vel for GOP candidates. He oscd out his appearance by making lhe traditional motion lal the vote be made unani- tious. Gov. George Homney sec- ndcd lhe motion and it was pproved by acclamation. In the convention itself, Scran- on was through when he and is forces lost n civil war over ivil rights and other issues in long, rough showdown Tuos- ,ay night. It was a showdown not only between the camps of wo major rivals for the high- est honor of a political party, but also between conservatism and liberalism. Conservative Leaning For the first time since the lays of Harding, ,Coolidge and ncn of thai slrip? the Repub- icnns rallied behind a conserv- ative nominee. The man they hose is a lean, six-foot, 55-year- Id Westerner with a high school ducation and a year of college. He has vhat Richard M. Nixon de- scribed as "refreshing candor" he has an uphill fight on lis hands against Johnson. Can he win? Not if lhe race were run today, Goldwater said a June 30 interview, but he eels that by eleclion day "il vill he a different horse race." 'Can'l Win' Scranton had said Goldwater an'l win and will bring down many Republican slate and longressional candidates with lim because of his views on domestic problems and foreign policy. But Nixon, who lost to John F. Kennedy in 1960, sees it another vay. Arriving in San Francisco Tuesday to try to acl as a unify- ng force, tho former vice presi- dent contended lhat Goldwater vill have an advantage because ie is an underdog and Ihus "on he attack." It was Evcrelt M. Dirkscn, (See GOLDWATER, Page 15) Mission Valley Approves Budget Trustees of Mission Valley In- dependent School District Tues- day evening approved a 1964-65 budget of up from the current year and including one new teaching position. The school, with grades one through nine, will now have a teaching staff of 10 persons. Tax rate will remain at 90 on the of assessed valuation, and increases In the budget will be covered by new revenue from a growth of some In assessed valuations from last year. Please Phone Between And A.M. City delivery of The Vic- toria Advocate should be completed every morning not later lhan 6 o'clock. For c o r r ected delivery service, please contact your carrier (see phone number on lasl receipt he issued to you) or call the Advocate, phone Hi 5-U5I, between and   

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