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Advocate: Monday, June 29, 1964 - Page 1

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - June 29, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 53 TELXPHOm m t-UU FBI Takes New Tack In Search Will Question All Workers PHILADELPHIA, Miss, (AP) at Philadelphia's two main industries will be ques- tioned individually Monday for possible clues to the disappear- ance of three civil rights work- ers, it was disclosed Sunday An FBI spokesman said road- blocks would be set up on all roads leading to the U.S. Motors Division of Emerson Electric and Wells-Lamont Corp., a a glove manufacturer. The spokesman, who declined to be identified, said each worker on every shift would be asked if he knew of anything connected with the disappearance. Will Post Pictures Pictures of the workers who vanished last Sunday also will be posted at several places In Philadelphia. Searchers suspended dragging operations for the night after another day of fruitless probing. State game wardens loaded their flat-bottomed skiffs onto pickup (rucks and drove them into this town, center of the massive hunt for the missing trio. To Resume Dragging The wardens, aided by stale and federal will resume dragging the Pearl River on Monday, while sailors from the nearby Meridian Naval Auxiliary Air Station will re- QS, turn to their task of scouring sat the swamplands. President Johnson ordered 100 seamen to Hie scene last Thursday but the Navy men were pulled off Sun- day to observe the Sabbath. SAVAGELY USED TEXAS, MONDAY. JUNE 29. 1964 1M4 Grenade Attack Brings LBJVows Full Quest Turmoil Back to Congo For Peace 'Must Take' Some Risks LKOPOLDVILLE, Congo (AP) With the last U.N. peace force troops packed to leave by rebellion, political turmoil and primi- tive tribal savagery boiled in the Congo on Sunday, A grenade atack shattered a wedding party attended by high Congolese officaLs in Leopoldville on Saturday night. Other attacks were aimed at voters. in a na- tional constitutional referen- dum. In the eastern provinces, Communist backed .rebels waged war and in some regions, army officers re- ported, tribes reverted to cannibalism. In Control A Communist supported rebel chieftain was reported in control of the North Ka- tanga Province capital of Albertville on the Western shore of Lake Tanganyika. Moise Tshombe was back in Leopoldville appealing for unity of all Congolese to end what he called "fratricidal strife." Tshombe, former leader of secessionist Katanga Prov- ince, returned Friday. An- other returnee was Albert Kalonji, the so-called god- emperor of the Baluba tribesmen in diamond-rich South Kasai. With Return Ironically, the departure of the last of the United Na- tions force that put down Tshombe's Katanga regime 18 months ago virtually coin- cides with his return to the Congo. A Congo army mutiny only seven days after indepen- dence in 1960 brought the U.N. force into being. At peak it numbered men from 12 nations. In the year Tshombe has been in exile, the U.N. force has been withdrawing. The final units scheduled to'go out are Nigerian troops and an equal number of Ethiopian troops. The U.N. force cannot stay on after June 30 because the U.N, General Assembly has not voted any funds for its opera- tion beyond that date. No Request There has been no request from (lie Congo that they stay on, aven though a high U.N. officer said recently, "These are lhe darkest days since 1960." The terrorists who at- tacked the wedding party and voting stations were be- lieved to have come from Brazzaville, across the Con- go River from here, where a committee of extremist exiles is reported plotting to overthrow the government of Premier Cyrille Adoula. The terrorists lobbed three grenades but only one ex- (See ATTACK, Page 6) Estes Firm Cheering Poles Established c FI surround RFK m. opening at Rio Loan, a pawn- shop owned by Paul Slone just a Set operations Monday to several lakes in the terrain around Phil- Cover 4M Yards In 12-foot, flat-bottomed skiffs, the search parties began comb- ing about 400 yards of the 60- yard-wide river near Yates crossing. The river is only eight The one-lime "boy wonder' farm-finance wizard, now under a prison sentence for fraud, re- fused to comment, to newsmen. He complimented the sign- Ihe current is sluggish. .The use of skindivers was ruled out be- cause the river is too muddy for underwater hunts. The National Guard loaned the Highway Patrol two helicop- ters which look to the air shortly after daybreak to scan the river and land northeast of Philadel- phia. Missing A Week Just one week ago the missing which bears Estes' name on the front of the pawnshop. "That's real Estes slid as he New York; and James Chaney, a 22-year-old Meridian, Miss., Negro dropped out of sight after paying a speeding fine in fhis east central Mississippi what Missis- persons case" was the finding last Tuesday of the burned-out liiilk of the station wagon they drove away from Philadelphia. Over the weekend President Johnson ordered more FBI agents to Mississippi and Gov. Johnson directed the Highway Patrol to "double its efforts" in the investigation. More college students most- s- e- ly white were expected in the dared in his prepared text: state Sunday for volunteer civil "We need in the White House rights work among Negroes Ihis a leader who thinks clearly, summer. who doesn't shoot from the hip, Goodman was one of an ad- who understands that his every yance guard of 175 who arrived word and action will influence in the stale eight days ago. He for better or for worse man- had been at Meridian only a few kind's hopes and work hours when he and the two other peace with freedom. youths decided to visit a burned out Negro church near Philadel phia. Piin cim A WARSAW, Poland  een 13 months since he has had a ride In one. And it's more than nine years since his 'irst trip to Mars, Venus and he moon, he says. About 50 people attended the two speaking sessions as the convention opened Saturday. 3ven though they were from 14 slates, tha turnout was disap- pointing. In 1059, Nelson says, were there including a man from London. Nelson suspects the spacemen lave been staying away and not making as much telepathic contact of Air rorce defense radar networks (hat scan the skies. The space- men don't like to bo detected by radar, Nelson says. The convention site Is a clear- ng near Nelson's house and not far from a spring where In July 1954, as Nelson has written and .old many times, three saucers appeared. He tried to appro one, but on that first trip was stunned by a ray. stopped him, but cured lumbago and neuritis. After that, lhe ships landed there often, Nelson says, be- cause they liked him and the water in the spring nearby. James L. Hill of told the convention that he too felt communication was diffi- cult. He said he has seen hun drcds of saucers over the years and Is the contact man for the space brothers In this part ol tho Missouri Ozarks. The con (acts are through telepathy, he says. "As a he said, "they give mo a message to give to you people, but today my mind is blank. I have no message.1' THE WEATHER saucers _ ipproach Con he a-m H Bi his level Partly cloudy Monday through Tuesday, with (he chance of a few isolated daytime showers or Ihundershowers. Variable, most- ly cast and southeast winds 6 to 16 m.p.h. Expected Monday temperatures: Low 73, high 05. South Central Texas: Partly cloudy Monday and Tuesday with widely scattered shower and Ihundershowers mainly south and near the coast. High Monday 90-33. I Sunday temperatures: Low 74 gh 07. Tides (Port La vac a-Port High at L, low at a.m. Tuesday Barometric pressure at sea 39.93. Sunset oMnday Tuesday This information based on dftl from the U.S. Weather sure; Victoria OHIce. fSco Weather Eliewhere, Page Brownings, Crashes Boost Toll Victims From All Age Groups By THE ASSOCIATED PROS Crownings and traffic crashes contributed heavily lo the toll as violence claimed 27 lives In Tex- as over June's final week end. Traffic crashes killed 13. Drownings look seven lives. Shootings and miscellaneous forms of violence killed the oth- rs. The Associated Press' tabula- tion began Friday at 6 p.m. and continued until midnight Sun- day. After Collision Mrs. Clara Lacy, 70, died in a Dallas hospital Sunday after- noon a few hours after she was Injured in a two-car collision on a North Central Expressway service road. Evelyn Rene Stewart, 18- month-old daughter of Airman and Mrs. Barney Stewart, drowned Saturday in an irriga- tion ditch near the Stewart Homo In El Paso. A man charged as James Robert Rich, 27, of Lubbock was found hanged .Saturday night in the Big Spring City Jail. Officers said he was placed In jail on a drunkenness and disturbance charge. Bullet Victim Bill Bollo, 23, Crockett, .was shot to death at Crockett late Saturday. Officers arrested a 28- year-old Negro. They said the shooting1 followed an argument. Howard Dale Love, 21, Piano, _.'ed Saturday night in a one-car accident on Interstate 35-Easl near Lewlsville, Denlon County. Two other Piano youths were hurt. Leslie Hill, 58, Fort Worth Negro, was shot to death Satur- day night. Deputy Sheriff Nel- son Kcllum said ho fired a shot- ;un blast after a man he caught ticking at the front door of a downtown Fort Worth Restau- rant fired at him with a rifle. Drowns in Lake Two-year-old Julie Ann Haag of San Antonio drowned Satur- day In Granite Shoals Lake. Charmalne Bottle Mennlng, 13, of Garland, drowned Satur- day while swimming in North Lake In Dallas County. Dennis Jones, 16, was killed in a one-car accident in Hous- ton Saturday. A pickup truck went out of control near Livingston Satur- day, killing Herman Clyde Bar- ringlon, 39, of Leggetl, Tex. ,j Billy Ray Moss, 37, of tub- 's bock fell from a moving freight train in Llltlefield Saturday and died under the wheels. A Haltom City Youth, Charles Owens, 18, drowned Saturday in Lake Grapevine in Tarrant County. A falling slee! beam at the port of Beaumont Saturday kill- ed Earl Jones, 32. Two brothers drowned at Lake Bel ton Saturday. They were James Finley, 13 and Thomas Flnley, 7, of Temple. Herman Turner Jr., 20, died Friday night in a shooting fol- (See VIOLENCE, Page sunrise James Oswald's Widow Demands Diary Publication Probe DALLAS (AP) Publication of a diary written by Lee Har- fey Oswald brought a demand 'or an investigation Sunday from the attorney of the ac- cused assassin's widow. The lawyer, William E. iffc Kemle, said, "Marina Oswald ulmll eeU that all evidence should have be given to the Warren Com- m mission and only released by the that The commission scheduled o report soon on its Inves- tigation of the slaying of Presi- lent Vohn F. Kennedy last Nov. 22 in Dallas. Police say Oswald Ired the shots. Portion] of the diary and oth- -r writings were published in copyright stories during the weekend by the Dallas Morning McKcnzie, in a formal state- lo ment saying he spoke for Mrs, Oswald, said the lource of (he Oswald Information possibly was a public official. He said Mrs. Oswald turned over all such material (o gov- ernment agencies and does not ave copies of It. The lawyer said he requested iat (he chief counsel for the Warren Commission, J, Lee Rankln, Investigate. McKenzle said Rankin lold him by telephone that the com- mission did not release the diary. Rankin, reached in New York, said, "We Just don't do those things when asked about McKenzle's statement. Questioned, "Were you asked aod Rankin replied, 'We don't tell whal lhe com- mission does." McKenzle said copies of the diary were In lhe possession of lhe Dallas police department, lhe FBI, Secret Service, Dallas district attorney's office, the U.S. atorney general's depart- ment and the Warren Commis- sion. "I feel hat someone, after the diary was in of'.eial hands, photostated the diary for his or her own selfish Mc- Kenzle said. Jack Ruby, 53, striptease club, operator, shot the 24-year-old Oswald to death Nov. 24 in the basement of the Dallas City Hall during a routine Jail transfer. Ruby was sentenced to death UM case is go appeal   

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