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Advocate Newspaper Archive: June 27, 1964 - Page 1

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Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - June 27, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th TELEPHONE HI (-U91 VICTORIA, TEXAS, SATURDAY; JUNE 27, 1964, 14 Cents APPLAUSE, BELLY LAUGHS Avon Bard No Highbrow, Festival Audience Avows By TOM E. FITE Advocate Staff Writer Anyone who may still believe that Shakespeare is highbrow should have been in Devereux Playhouse Friday evening. A capacity opening night au- dience stopped the action more tlian a dozen times with ap plause between belly laughs Such is "A Midsummer Night's as written some 370 years ago by William Shakespeare and performed with exhuberance and fidelity by the Victoria Shakespeare Festival company. Sets designed by Ralph Howard allowed the audience a rare look backslage as the scene shifted from the castle of I he Duke of Athens to a nearby wood, and back again. And the spectacle was better for it. The problem with describing the performance itself, though, is just where to begin. There had been some concerned that in a company of professionals and non-professionals, the con- Irasls might be sharp. That was rarely, if ever, true Fri- day evening. Professionals in the cast, who have been invaluable to Director Charles McCally in whipping the production togeth- er, were hard put !o match the effectiveness of their proteges most of the evening. Steven Bunnell, (or instance. We dont know what Steven's baiting average was in Little League this summer, but as Puck it was something well despite (he fact that he missed a good half of the rehearsals to complete t h e Litlle League season. Not all the audiences will see this same Puck, since the role will be divided during the next 11 performances between young Mr. Bunnell and pixiesh Jennefer Rick. T h e latter Judged on the basis of rehears- al performances, won't let tht team batting average fall. Then'thei'c were the merrj men of Peter Quince, a com- pany-within-a-company to per- form before the Duke. No fun- nier sextet is likely to be found. Peler Quince, of course, is played by Patrick Tucker, the talented Brilon who comes to Victoria by way of Boston Uni- versity and about whom a great deal has been written. Some- thing audiences cannot see bj watching him on stage, how- ever, is that his infectious good humor, as well as his compe- tence, seems overflowed to his non-professional fellow workers Williams Hauptman, Jerry Dixon, Irving Lippman anc Frank Davidson produced buf- foons of great polish as Robin Starveling, Francis Flute, Tom Snout and Snug. Nick Bottom of this same company within-a-company fit- tingly was assigned to James Bottom, a Baylor and Dallas Theatre Center product who makes an almost perfect jack. ass. By way of explanation, this hapless is really a quite mortal vie tim of the prankish Puck, and therefore must wear the ass's head for the betler part of the evening. It isn't such a sorry lot for Bottom, however, when you con sider lhat but for Puck he woulc not have been loved even brief ly by the luscious Tilania, queen (See SHOW, Page 14) IAf ANTARCTICA Mrs. Betsy Hulscy at HI-3 4441 and Airs. Linda Armslronj at Hi- 5-0120 and other mem bers of Jaycee-Ettes g e 111 n their deadline for selling lick els for the Shakespeare Festi val extended until July 2 Vic Huebner always findini time to talk about fishing Yolanda Castancda, who wa make-up artist for the Trai Theatre last year, writing t friends from Pcnn State Un versity where she is taking Cre ative Drama courses but plan ning to be back in Victoria thi Dr. E. Phillips findin. a nice dry barn to save hi saddle from the rain when caught in a sudden even in; shower while working his cul ting horse and others dashin for shelter, being Glenn Me veen, Aubrey Breed Jr., Gen Geisttnan, Lonnie Morris anc C. E. all cutting hors enthusiasts Sam Bailey 1 looking forward lo seeing bol of his daughters in "Midsurr mer's Nighl's Dream." whic opened this weekend I h C, F. Taylors starling early for their regular shopping Russians Cede Cuba Gun Bases Castro Warned To Hold Fire THE PLAYBILL'S THE Sandra Andruf, loft, and Miss Gloria Hill, a teacher at Dexereux School, were among first-nighters at the Victoria Shakespeare Festival Friday evening and found the playbill like everything else connected with the production is something special. It has been specially designed for scrapbook purposes. (Advo- cate Photo) Navy Rescues Injured Seabee CHRISTCHURCH, New Zea-i and badly injured American Seabee was in a Christchurch hospital Saturday after a history-making U.S. toy flight plucked him out of he perpetual midwinter dark- ness of Antarctica. Navy doctors said Builder l.C. 3elhel Lee McMullen, 39, was Squally Area Poses Threat Of Hurricane By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Weather Bureaus in Miami and Puerto Rico cocked wary eyes on a strong squally area n the Windward Islands 400 miles east of Barbadoes. Winds justed up to SO miles an hour nnd appeared likely to increase. The squally area was moving west. Such conditions some tunes grow into tropical storms or hurricanes and occasionally stray into the Gulf of Mexico. Showers fell along the Texas coast Friday and spread inland n an uneven pattern over South Texas. Laredo received 1.32 inches in n serious condition from the ractured spine and concussion ic suffered in a fall June 20 a McMurdo Sound. The doctors said they were hopeful surgery would not be necessary. McMullen's legs vere paralyzed in the fall. The ather of four children, he i: rom Hueneme, Calif. The plane, a C130 HerculeL commanded by Lt. Robert V Mayer of North Kingslown, R.I. made Uie first midwinter fligh o Antarctica in history. From McMurdo, Mayer, a 'eteran of four years of antarc ic flying, radioed he planned tc 'stay on the deck a maximum of four hours" to load McMul en and ready the ski-shod plani or a return takeoff. Outbound, Mayer had radioec hat conditions were ideal, wit; visibility of 15 miles and th emperature zero. His touchdown at McMurdo he main U.S. base in Antarc lea, was 10 minutes behinc schedule when the big plan >ickcd up heavy headwinds a ts cruising altitude The plane took off from Christchurch at noon Friday and made the fligh o McMurdo in 8 hours, 25 min utes. The ship landed back a "Ihrislchurch airport at a downpour between 8 and 9 a.m. local lime Saturday. Official rainfall measurements for the 24 hours ending at 6 p.m. included .31 inch at Houston. Maximum temperatures ranged from 97 degrees at Pre- sidio down to 84 at Alpine. A thundershower at Colulla. below San Antonio, dropped the early afternoon temperature to 76 degrees. McAlIen had lighl rain, and clouds built up around Brownsville. AH Texas was warm except in the shower areas. The shower activity was ex- pected lo end during the night, the Weather Bureau said. Little change was in sight for the Texas weather pattern Sat urday. San Jaciuto's Architect Dies HOUSTON  0-year membership pin In the Odd Fellows Lodge. He was veteran of World War I. Services Today Funeral services will be held Florida Governo Calls New Police ST. AUGUSTINBVFla. Gov. Farris Bryant loured strife-torn St. Augustine on Fri- day and then called in 80 more slate law officers to help pre vent further racial violence. iaturday at 4 p.m. from Mc- Cabe-Carrulh Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. John New- on officiating. Burial will be in Evergreen Cemetery with B.M. Dugal, M. J. Krueger, W. R. Marshall, C. B. Patterson, W.G. Wheller and F. E. Smith as >allbearers. All ciders of First Presbyte- rian Church are named h o n- orary pallbearers. Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Aline Holzheuser Schneid- er; a son, Charles Fredrick Schneider III of Victoria; a daughter, Mrs. Fredalln Krue ger of Victoria; a sister, Mrs. Georgia L. Jones of Victoria; two grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Cuero Hunt Continues For Suspect Advocate CUERO A Corpus Chrlsll man wanted in connection with a Thursday night kidnaping and robbery near here remained at arge Friday night. John Henry James, 39, has )ecn charged with robbery by assault after Marcelino Cruz Uiiz, 27, of Houston, told offi- cers lhal he was kicked in Ihe tomach and robbed of about ilO at gunpoint after he had illched a ride with James. Huiz received overnight hos- pllalizatlon for bruises suffered n the Incident. A statewide alert was Issued for [he arrest ot James, who was described as about five eel, 10 inches tall and wearing a moustache. He s reported driv- ing a black and while 1953 mod- el Mercury stalionwagon bear- (See HUNT, Page 14) THE WEATHER Clear partly cloudy a n war Saturday through Sunday wilh a few. widely scaltecec mostly afternoon and evening thundershowers. Winds easterly ot 5 lo 15 m.p.h. Expected Sat urday temperatures; High 96 low 74. South Cenlral Texas: Partly cloudy and warm through Sun- day with widely scattered show- ers, mainly south portion and along Ihe coast. Highs Saturday u> 98. Friday temperatures: High 96, low 73; Tides (Port O'Connor p.m. Saturday, a.m. and low Sunday. Lavaca-Port Low al High it 7; 54 al p.m. Barometric pressure at sea level: 30.01. Sunset Saturday: S u n- rise Sunday: Thli Inlurrnillon on roni U.S. Bunau VlctorU Bryant also said he wns con stdering banning all demonstra [tons "day and night." Atlcr'n turning to Ihe state capital, h said he would net call out th Malonal Guard, "at least fo the moment." The 80 new officers boost th total to 230. The governor arrived for a inspection the morning nfle this city's worst outbreak of ra clal violence. He outlawed nigh demonstrations more than week ago. It was this curfew that causa U.S. Dlst. Judge Bryant Simp son at Jacksonville to order Ih governor to'show cause why h should not be held In cntemp The Judge had held a slmlla ban, impsed by St. Augustln police, a violation of freedom o speech and assembly. While Bryanl conferred wit his top officers al Nalionu Guard headquarters here, Atty Gen. James Kyncs defendci lim in the contempt case. Kynes called Judge Simpson order to the governor a "mis conceived, Improper and inadi means of challenging th exercise of sovereign power b a slate governor." "The governor of Florida ha Ihe dominant Interest In pre venting violence and disorder he said. "The stale is the n. (See FLORIDA, Page M> TURN OUT West Berliners Cheer Address by Kennedy BERLIN (API-Hundreds of thousands of West Berlinerg turned out Friday to give a big and hearly .welcome to U.S. Ally. Gen. Robert F. Kennedy as lie commemorated the first anniversary of the triumphal visit by his the lale President Kennedy as a man dedicated to making the work! a better place to live in. And he told Europeans it is erroneous to conclude that Republican Sen. Barry Goldwater of Arizo- na has-widespread support in the United States. Kennedy made the comment; al a news conference when asked about Goldwater, regard- ed as the favorite in Ihe race for the Republican presidential "The primary votes do'not in- dicate many millions of Ameri- cans favor Kenne- dy uid. "He lost in New Hamp- shire and Oregon. He won in California, but was running only against Gov. (Nelson A.) rockefeller, who had problems involving his personal life. "That dcet not indicate wide- spread support. All of the polls show that Goldwater ii not so popular, that be bat diaod- vantages and difficulties lo rec on wilh. I may be thought pr iudlced as a Democrat, but lave had experience wilh pc ttlcal campaigns and judge o kc lively." He declared any Candida who opposes the government (See ADDRF.SS, Page M) Whites Arrested Agency Dulles Giles Control Needs WASHINGTON (AP) Allen Dulles recommended Friday ml the FBI slep up its role jalnst "terroristic activity" in ississlpp! by expanding its lanpower on assignment there. A few hours later the agency ipoi'lcd the arrest of three hife Misslssipplans on charges I threatening civil rights 'orkcrs. After reporting lo President ohnspn mi his special mission o Mississippi, Ihe former di- ector of the Cenlral Intelligence gency told White House rc- orlers his principal recom- mendation was Hint the FBI lay an expanded part, working ith slate and local authorities, i "control and prosecute ler- oristic activities." Sent By President Dullus was sent to Mississippi s Johnson's personal emissary fter the disappearance of thrca Ivil rights workers ,lhrusl Mis- issippl again into Iho racial melight. The arrests announced early Friday night by the FBI were made earlier in Ihe day at Ilia icna in west-central Mississippi bout 85 miles from the area vhcro the civil rights workers 'isappeored last Sunday. An 'BI spokesman said the cases ire not connected. The men arrcsled were barged wilh interfering with ind threatening two while civil ighls workers and an lllti Bena 'Jcgro on Thursday while tho civil righls workers wore dis- rlbullng leaflets about  e fined as much as and mprisoned (or 11 years. Dulles stressed his belief hat "Iho main burden in impressing these terroristic ac- Ivitics" rests on stale and local authorities. Dulles told reporters lhat dur- ng their two-hour session he and the President lalkcd by shone with Gov. Paul B. John- son Jr. of Mississippi and the jovernor "seemed to take them Ihe recommendations fn- wably." But Dulles added he ivouid let tho governor express u's own views. Dulles snid ho expccls President Johnson lo act soon on his reeommenda- ions. Recognized Danger In Jackson, Gov. Johnson lat- er told newsmen Ihe slate will irolect civil righls workers as veil as II can hut acknowledged will be some danger for :hem. In a prepared statement, he said the slale "will maintain surveillance of the activities of all extreme groups. This in- cludes Negro groups as well as white groups." In addition to recommending slcpped-up FBI activity, Dulles said he .recommended various other slate and local "and, as appropriate, federal" actions to protect Negroes and civil righls workers. Dulles noted that FBI Di- rector J. Edgar Hoover has In- creased his agency's strength in Mississippi substantially since the three young workers van- ished in the east central part of the state last Sunday. The former CIA chief did not specify any particular "terror- istic activities" but said joint action Is needed to control (See ROLE, M) SUNDAY PREVIEW Narcotics Traffic Inquiry traffic a major problem in Victoria? Lnw enforcement offkliU sty "No" In a slory by Police Rcporlcr Janet SlaoM com tag ip in Uie Sunday Advocate. Girl Scout Camp Camp Greei HID, the Pilsano Council's Girl Scout at Laie Cvrpn CnrhU, Is fealrvtd In story and plc- h tab week's FUN Magaitae, appearing with the Tomorrow's Belles, Beans Advocatelawl's Belles and Beam, a photographic fea- tarc o( toaorraw'i leaden and bomtmakrrs, will be inau- gurated la Suday'i Victoria Advocate wilh the coopcrnllon professional photographers. The new feature, spolllRhllng to iix yean, will appear regularly.   

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