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Advocate Newspaper Archive: June 22, 1964 - Page 1

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Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - June 22, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 46 TILEPBONK m i-UU VICTORIA', TEXAS, MONDAY, JUNE 22, 1964 Established ISM 14 Cents Delegate Duel Enters New Phase Goldwater Far Ahead WASHINGTON (AP) The two main contenders for the Re- publican presidential nomina- tion enter a new phase this week in their duel for delegates to the GOP convention which opens three weeks from Tuesday. With all delegates chosen, it now becomes a battle between Sen. Barry Goldwater, of Ari- zona, wlio seeks to keep his big lead, and Pennsylvania's Gov. William W. Scranton, who hopes to derail the senator's bandwa- gon before the first ballot. There will be no fresh infu- sion of voles from other quar- ters now that Montana Republi- cans have chosen their 14 dele- gales. As expected, they were pledged to Goldwater. The Breakdown The Associated Press survey of the delegates based on primary commitments, instruc- tions, pledges and stated prefer ence shows this first ballot breakdown: Goldwater, 694. Scranton, 138. Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller of New York, 105. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge, 45. Sen. Margaret Chase Smith of Maine, 15. Former Vice President Rich- ard M. Nixon, 8. Favorite sons, 84. Uncomitted 219. Polical Calendar While most of the attention this week will be on the Scran- ton vs. Goldwater struggle, there are other events on the po- litical calendar. For one thing, Democrats will convene in Minnesota, Montana, Oklahoma, Utah and Washing- ton to choose delegates to casl 148 votes at their national con- vention beginning Aug. 24 in At- lantic City. Even though he hasn't formally announced his candidacy, President Johnson is expected to be the choice of al delegates named this week. Also on tap are Democratic primary runoff elections in South Carolina Tuesday an< North Carolina Saturday, an< endorsement by Utah Demo- crats for governor, senator ant two house seats. Party Nomination In South Carolina attorney Tom Gettys and State Solicita George Cole man are battling for the party nomination to sue ceed Rep. Robert W. Hemphill who resigned to become a fed eral judge: In North Carolina two forme judges seek the gubernatoria nominations. They are L. Rich ardson Preyser, a onetime fed eral judge who has the suppor of Gov. Terry Sanford, and Dan K. Moore, a former state judge Sen. Frank E. Moss is unop posed for the Democratic nom ination to a new term in Utah and endorsement by 80 per cen of Saturday's convention, whic would make it unnecessary fo him to run in the slate's Aug. l primary, is expected. Ernest I: Dean and Calvin Ramplon see the guvernatprial endorsemeni and neither is expected to ge 80 per cent, setting up a pr" mary election contest. Scranton launched his bid fo delegates last week, meetin with state delegions from Kan sas, Missouri, Minnesota, Color ado, Kentucky, Massachusetts Rhode Island and New Hamp shire. He picked up some votes, bu for the most part they ha either been uncommitted or the favored Gov. Rockefeller. Golc water also lost a few votes bu more than offset this by gainin support from other delegate, who previously had been as uncommitted. Scranton's forces scored on victory in the District of Colum bia. There the nine delegate had been co mi tied by an infor mal agreement, to east five firs (Set DELEGATES, Page 12 Hear in Chicagi King CHICAGO (AP) Tbe Re Martin Luther King Jr., told rally of some Sunday lha congressional approval of ciw rights legislation heralds "th dawn of 4, new hope for the Ne- gro." But, he said, much progress remains to be won. The crowd in Chicago's lak< front Soldier Field Stadium als heard a message from Prcsiden Johnson that the civil rights bi "is meaningful, not only be- cause of what it contains in UK way of legal requirements, bul as an expression of national d termination lo achieve gen progress." The meeting, sponsored nearly 100 Illinois civic and r llgious organizations, was a tended predominantly by N eroo. DOING FINE5 Port Youth, 16, Accidentally Shot Advocate 5crvk< PORT LAVACA -Marvin rakos, 16-year-old Calhoun gh School junior, received a otgun blast in the left leg .low the knee early Sunday orning while on a bunting trip ear Indianola. Young Strakos was reported s "getting along fine." Sunday ght at Champ Traylor Me orial Hospital, where he was. ken' after the accident. His arents, Mr. and Mrs. Eddie rakos, were in Dallas at the me of the accident. Chief Deputy Joe A. Roberts id Sunday night that Strakos id two companions had reached ie site where they camped jout 2 p.m. Saturday. The le, near the upper end of owderhorn Lake, was reached boat. The accident occurred about a.m. Sunday as the trio was preparing breakfast al a campfire. Roberts said Strakos was standing on a bank above the fire when the shotgun slid down the bank and fired, the charge striking him in the left leg. The youth applied a tourniquet to his own leg to stem the flow was of blood, dressed and packed the wound himself. His companions were rushing him to the hospital in their boat when the motor sheared a pin, temporarily stranding them. However, a nearby party took the injured youth in their boat, brought him to their car and then to the hospital. The youths had gone to site to shoot wild hogs which roam the area. Violence ?oll Soars n Texas 40 Are Killed, 21 in Traffic Scranton Claims Switching Near WASHINGTON (AP) -Gov. 'illiam W. Scranton of Penn- ylvania said Sunday he expects elegates to the Republican Na- onal Convention lo begin witching from Sen. Barry Gold- ater to him in about a week nd a half. Scranton, opening a busy 'eek in his last-hour drive to tin the GOP presidential nom- nation, said a number of prev- ously uncommitted delegates or elegates comitted to Goldwater Iready have indicated they ow are for him. He gave no figures but said he shifting is already taking lace "in greater numbers than expected" but he estimated Position Of Ike Seen Differently WASHINGTON Sen. Hugh Scott, R-Pa., expressed onfidence Sunday that Dwight Eiswnhower favors Pennsyl- ania Gov. William W. Scran- pn for the Republican presiden- inl nomination. But Sen. John G. Tower, R. 'ex., a staunch backer of Sen iarry Goldwater, R-Ariz., the eader in the nomination con- est, retorted that the former (resident has "expressed his leutrality and his determination o remain aloof" from the bat- le. He said no one should make any assumptions about his posi- ion. Scott said it wouldn't be prop ir to quote Eisenhower. But he added, "I have no doubt in my mind whatever that as between he various candidates, he in his mind prefers Gov. Scranton as he presidential nominee." "I am perfectly certain he is so proud of Gov. Scranton tha am satisfied in my own mine he believes he would be lh efore returning to Harrisburg Scranton contended that Goldwa er must win the nomination on the first ballot or risk failing U get the nomination. "If he doesn't win on the firs >allot, it would very difficul or him to win at Scran on said. Scranton met at the airpor with the District of Columbi GOP delegation to the Sa Francisco convention nex month. "I think it was a very sue :essful Scranton said ile declined to specify whethe any of the delegates had swim over to him from other commit men Is. Scranton sharply criticizec Soldwater's vole against clolur a halt the civil righls debat and the Arizonan's subsequen vote against the bill itsel! Scranton said if nominated anc elected president, Goldwate would have great difficulty en forcing the bill. "I think it would be a rea ;est of his Scran :on said. "Someone who Is no very enthusiastic about the la' doesn't enforce it well." Gold water has said the legis lation will lead to use of pollc state methods and that som provisions are unconstitutional. Scranlon said Goldwater' vote was out of line with th majority of the Republicans the House and Senate. "He was one of a very sma he added. But despite their difference the governor said he would sup port Goldwater if he is th nominee, but does not want t be Goldwater's vice-presidenlia running mate. His support, he continue! would be based on the fact tha (See SCRANTON, Page 1Z) PRAYER FOR FUTURE Pope ?Paul Celebrates Anniversary of Election Pope you. uine VATICAN CITY (AP) Paul VI celebrated Sunday the "irsl anniversary of his election and prayed lhat he be allowed to offer his work and life to Ihe world. The pontiff appeared at his studio window at noon to bless the Sunday crowd in St. Peter's Square and he recalled that it was at noon a year ago Sunday that he first appeared as Pope. More than had jammed the square that day, after the white smoke had gone up from the Sistinn Chapel an- nouncing to the world that a new ruler of the Roman Catho- lic Church had been chosen. Minutes after his election by the College of Cardinals to succeed Pope John XXIII, the new poo- tiff appeared on the balcony of St. Peter's Basilica tod gave first "Urbl ct btessing- the dty of Rome and the world. Approximately stood in the square Sunday to hear Paul recall that event and tell them-. "You know that all our efforts, nd lor for the Church, for th world, for peace." "May the new 'ayed, "work for you and offc ills life for you and bless you Before appearing, Pope Pai now ffi, went to St. Peter's an celebrated a Mass dedicated pilgrims who came from Mil for the atmtversary1 celebratlo Before his election Pope Pa had been Giovanni Cardin Montini, archbishop of Milan. 2n his Boon speech the pent told the Italians and forei touris Is gathered in the squar "Today we ask you to pray f us, to give your prayers for o humble person and our gre mission, pray .that the Lo have mercy on us, that Chr accept being represented In ou humble work.'.' Since becoming Pope, Pau his has -Continued Pope Jofan'i Ecu menical Council, dedicated nuxierniatioQ of the Chur and Christian unity. historic pllgrlmag to the Holy, Land, where he ir and embraced Orthodox Patr (SM POPE, U) Laredo Man Found Dead in Motel Pool By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Highway crashes sent the vlo- nt death toll soaring over the eekend in Texas. The Associated Press tabula- n showed that 21 persons died result of tmfic mishaps lile drownlngs, shootings and her accidents sent the total ath toll to 40. The tabulation started at 6 m. Friday and coninued rough midnight Sunday. Pour persons were killed and others injured in three- hide collision near Lubbock rly Sunday. Killed in Ihe ash were Fecundo Borego, 52; 5 wife, Carmen Borego, Mrs. Lucia Oliverez, 43, all Roule 1, Lubbock. A teen-age aughter, Carmen, of the Bor- DS died later Sunday of burns. Drowns IB Gulf Earl Kipler, 21-year-old air- an from Kelly Air Force Base, an Antonio, drowned Sunday in e Gulf of Mexico after he dove om a pier on Padre Island. Mickey Green. 14, Kilgore, ed Sunday of injuries suffered aturday when his motdrscooler as hil from behind by a car. Jerry Don Akcrs, 18, Dallas, as killed early Sunday in a 'p-car crash at a Dallas intcr- clion. Joyce Moorelindev, 28, Bcau- ont, died Saturday in a two- ar accident at Galveston. Tom Alcorn, 63, Holliday, ichita County, died in Wichita Falls hospilal of in- ries suffered Friday night hen struck by a car as he alked along a rural road. Dies In Shoaling L. C. Perry, 27, died Sunday a shooting at a Wichita Falls ar. Investigators said it fol- jwed an argument. Fred Lozano, 59, Dallas, rpwned Sunday while swim- iing near the Terrell pump sta- on at Lake Tawakoni. Charles Edward Daingerfield, 9, Fort Worth, was reported mssing and presumed drowned n Lake Arlington, near Fort Vorlh Dsingjerfield dis- ppcared while swimming early TOP RODKO WINNERS Three youlhs from widely scattered points in Texas won top honors in the 18th annual Slate Championship High School Rodeo that ended in HaHetts- ville Saturday night They are (from left) Jody Freeman, 16, of Brenham, rodeo queen; Jim Pearson, 18, of Alvtn, outstanding cowboy, and Irene Eppermuer, 18, of Pecos, outstanding cowgirl. (Advocate Photo) 3 Americans Missing In Human-Wave Attack unday in the lake. Mr. and Mrs. Claude Sher- wood of Frederick, Okla., were illed in a head-on crash near Grapevine Saturday. Atop Bridge A two car collision early Sat- rday at the top of the Rainbow 'ridge between Orange and 'ort Arthur killed Earl II. Con- ;y, 63, of Groves, his wife, 60, nd Mrs. Arlene Zoch of Orange. A 33-year-old San Antonio cafe wner, Joseph Alvin Every, led Saturday six hours after eing shot in Ihe chest. A light plane crash al Clute illed Lee Thomas Green Jr. of 'alestine Saturday. A Quaker Oats plant employe, Jrnest Wilson, 53, was found ccidentally hanged in Sherman aturday. Bullets from a policeman's istol killed 17-year-old Max lien Cooper of Wichita Falls 'hen three youths were found rowllng in a Wichita Falls cafe dawn Saturday. Mrs. Christine Johnson died n Fort Worth Saturday of two ullet wounds In the chest jn a hooting at a liquor store she perated. Six-year-old Mark Luke Jampbell was thrown from his amily's pickup truck in San Augustine Saturday and killed, j, The body of Charlie B. Fergu on, 74, was found in a private ake east of Nacogdoches Salur day. R. A. Harrison, 47, of Fort Worth drowned in Eagle Moun- ain Lake Saturday. Richard H. Fanning, 25, of Houston, was killed early Sun- day one ear accident in Fort Worth. A man Identified as Henry vfcTear of Houston was shot to death in a fight in a Houston rooming house Saturday night. Roy Harlen Wilson, 17, died Saturday night of injuries he re- ceived in a motor scooter acct SAIGON, South Viet fought 10 miles northeast (AP) Communist Viet Nlnh, 50 miles northwest of guerrillas .rolled over a namese Special Forces American Special Forces >any with human wave was killed In an ambush in JYiday, apparently same general area eight hree Americans, U. S. ago. reported guerrilla Attack, launched A U. S. military 300 to 500 men, overwhelmed said a wounded American company of 100 men on patrol ;er and two U. S. enlisted of Ihe nearby Soul Da Spe- iad disappeared during the Forces camp. Johnson Back in Well Pleased With WASHINGTON (AP) he Interpreted Ilia good re- dent Johnson flew back lo he got, notably tn San While House on Sunday as reflecting broad after three days of for the administration's n California and went into mmediale conference wllh Edmund G. Brown and retary of Stalo Dean Democratic leaders told White House sources they were convinced tusk and Johnson met parly's national and stale y to prepare for talks will carry the stale by Prime Minister Ismet Inonu margins. They told Turkey, who arrives here Ihey believed Demo- candidates will grab Johnson, who will confer from areas of traditional n the week wllh strength in the George Papandreou of will try in his meetings with from the presidential .wo leaders to take some of the big statewide contcsl icat out of the Cyprus pit Democrat Pierre Salin- Jiat threatens war Johnson's former press Greece and against Republican The President, who Murphy for election lo most of his time In Senate. in San Francisco and Los who had two lengthy geles, was described as with Salinger dur pleased by the visit. It was JOHNSON, Page tt) Verdict Pending In Case Body Was Fully Clothed Clyde A. Marshall K, of Laredo drowned Sunday after- noon in the swimming pool of Conlinenlal Inn, 2702 Houston Highway. Marshall's body was found floating face down in the pool about by Frank Thompson, n porter, who was showing John H. Compton of Corpus Chrlsli, who had just registered, to his room. They pulled Marshall's fully clothed body from the pool, and Began artificial respiration. The Rescue Unit was called from the Fire Depnrlment, but their ef- foils were to no avail. A physi- cian pronounced Marshall dead at the scene. Verdict Withheld Justice of the Peace Alfred C. Baass said Sunday night that he had not yet returned a formal verdict, but Indicated that he had found no evidence of foul piny. No persons could be found who had actually seen Marshall fall Into the pool. Marshall's eyeglasses were re- covered from the bottom of the wol. Patrolmen Raymon Sibert, The U. S. spokesman said 60 men still were missing aancnez ana Jesse u. Ramirez, detective, all from Vlc-oria Police Department, in- along wllh Ihe Americans. the death. expressed hope thai some hud registered at the drift back to government lines n tho next few days. The Viet Cong were known Wednesday, and had been under the core of two physicians, A billfold containing Was found in his room. have been building up lo Sought cal slronglh around the effort wns being made laic s'inh area in the past few to determine how long U. S. sources said. Fear had iccn expressed that Ihe Vic had been In tho pool Before his body was found. One witness indicated to police that Cong might attempt lo had seen Marshall in the tho provincial cnpilnl of only 15 or 20 minutes be- Ihe body was discovered. Special Forces activity in tho region has been autopsy was performed. Tho body was sent Sunday night to Fnlfurrlas, for services U. S, sources said it was not yet fully certain lhat Ihe and possibly at Brunl. Duckctl Funeral Home, which cans had been captured, but an ambulance to Ihe scene was presumed so because they lave, heen missing for nearly Iwo days In a region close the body was discovered, vas in charge of local arrangements. government Government reinforcements moved Into the area soon after .ho batlic and within two Rain 300 troops combed tho area. Sporadic fighting look Plains Military operations THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Sunday In hope of recovering rams soaked the missing American and Plains lute Sunday. mese than two inches of rain If Uie Viet Cong In fact floods at some street in- tured the Americans, It In Lubbock. Some the lolal of American damage was blamed on believed to bo In Viet winds. At nearby hands to which also hod over 'wo Inches of rain lichtnlnc? Today's a residence and a cafe. Levclland reported 1.75 inch- Conscience Is a small, slill voice that makes minority At Brownfiolcl, where .50 of an inch fell, power was disrupted FDA Under Fire on Drug That Helped But Killed (See VIOLENCE, Page 12) Nikita Sails Off to Sweden COPENHAGEN, Denmark Premier Khrush- chev has ended his visit to Den- wonderful Danish ideas on production and science. He sailed Sunday for Sweden on the second leg of his 19-day Scandinavian tour. He said In a brief farewell viet liner Bashkiria for Stock- holm that his talks In Denmark looked into it some time ago. WASHINGTON (AP) Ora- bilex is a drug that dyes the gall bladder of a sick person so it shows up better on an X-ray and then doctors can see exact- ly what is wrong. Doctors say drugs like this have saved many surgeons know the exact extent of a gall bladder disease before they operate. But Orabilex has a bad effect on some people. It may damage their kidneys. According to a congressional subcommittee, at FDA officials defended their decisions. They said they fol- owed their duty in this case. And they add they have changed hose procedures that may have >een faulty. Here is the story of Orabilex saying he hoped to borrow some least 28 persons who used Ora- bilex died before the Food and Drug Administration ordered it off the market early this year. A House Government Opera- tions subcommittee finished speech before boarding the So- bearings last, week on Orabilex. A similar Senate subcommittee had been friendly and inter- esting. Khrushchev apparently be- came resigned to the fact that Denmark Intends to retain Its ties with the West and saw no use In trying to persuade the The story of Orabilex raises questions about the problems in- volved In the government pro- cedure of Judging whether a drug Is safe. Rep. L. H. Fountain, D-N.C. chairman of the subcommittee, friendliness shown his itay acre. him during Danes otherwise, despite the expressed some doubts abou< the procedures erf UM FDA in Uw THE WEATHER Clear to partly cloudy and con :lnued warm Monday through Tuesday, with daytime southerly vinds 10 to 20 rn.p.h., with gusts o 25 m.p.h. Expected Monday Low 75, high S3. South Central Texas, South- east Texas: Clear to partly cloudy Monday and Tuesday. Sunday temperaturea: Low high 93. Tides (Port Lac a ca-Port O'Connor Lows at a.m., and p.m., at p.m. and a.m. Tuts- slons. prenora at Barometric level: 29.95. Sunset Monday sunrise Tuesday Thli tnformtUon on dlta 23 rom Uu UJ. Wwthar Bunau as outlined in testimony before he House subcommittee and in documents published by Ihe Sen- ale subcommittee: E. Fougcra Co. of Hicksvil- e, N.Y., submitted its applica- .lon for Orabilex to the FDA in 1058. The FDA checked into the ani- mal tests submitted by E. Fou gera and decided they were In sufficient to prove the drug was safe. A few months later, E. Fougera submitted more animal tests and the FDA concluded lhat the additional material in- dicated that the drug was safe. Recently, a House subcommit- .ee consultant, Dr. Clarke Dav- son of George Washington Uni- versity, prepared a memoran- dum that said even these an! mal tests were insufflcent to show the drug .was safe. The FDA, however, strongly dis- agrees wllh Davidson's conclu- The FDA approved Orabilex on Oct. 24, 1958. Its approved label said there was a "notable absence of side effects." cr. Midland had .10 of an inch. The thunderstorm activity de- veloped as sweltering tempera- tures marked the first official day of summer In the state. Presidio had 102 degrees and Laredo and Midland 100. Gal- veslon had the low maximum of M degrees. Elsewhere tempera- tures were in Ihe 90s. The early morning minimums ranged from 69 degrees at Lub- bock to 80 at Corpus Galveston and Palacios. The high temperatures with scattered thunderstorm activity were to continue through Mon- day. 3 Die as Plane Falls in Field HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) -A single engine plane, barely missing a motel, crashed Into an open field Sunday and burst Into flames, killing three per- sons and seriously injuring a fourth. The charred bodies, trapped in the wreckage for more than Wi hours, were identified by Dr. George Paul us Jr., deputy York County coroner, as: Michael Vanasco, 40, Harris- burg, the pilot; his son Martin, 15, and Marlene Meade, 14, a neighbor of the Vanascos. Psulus said he had made his Identification from papers and Between that date and Apr! documents found in the plane, 1962, according to Assl.iwhich went down shortly after (See FDA, Page 12) take-off.   

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