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Advocate Newspaper Archive: June 20, 1964 - Page 1

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Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - June 20, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                119th 44 TELEPHONE HI HOI VICTORIA, TEXAS, SATURDAY, JUNE, 20, 1964 Cltablllhtd 6 Persons Hurt In Four Wrecks Three Accidents Inside City, Two Involve Multiple Crashes By JAMES SIMONS Advocate Staff Writer Six persons were injured Fri- day in four spectacular traffic accidents involving 10 vehicles. of the mishaps occurred wilhin a two-hour period. Three of the victims were hospitalized. They are Leonard Louviere, 23, of 2406 N. B e n Wilson Road, Mrs. Lorene L. Marbach Jr., 52, of Route 3, and Matias Bernal Garcia, 19, of 808 S. Liberty St. Others injured were Ellis U.N. Force To Remain In Cyprus Thi-ee-Moiiths Stay Approved UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. of the U.N. Cyprus force for another three months was assured Friday night when Security Council members and the countries di- rectly concerned agreed it was needed to prevent new violence. The United Stales threw its backing behind (lie extension after Cyprus, Greece, Turkey and Britain had announced their support of a five-nation resoullion authorizing the man force to remain on the strife-torn island. The Soviet Union did not urge the extension, but declared it would not oppose it. First Business U.S. Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson said: "The first or- der of business of this council is to assure an extension of the United Nations force on the is- land." ..-SJephenson recalled that -the United States had contributed million to help finance the force for its first three months ending June 27 and ap- pealed to all countries to con- tribute to the project. He did not say how much the United States was prepared to give. The council listened to long statements from representatives of Cyrpus, Turkey and Greece but deferred a vote until Sat- urday after the Cypriot repre- sentative said he wanted to make a detailed answer to Tur- kish charges of Greek Cypriol mistreatment of Turkish Cypri ots on the island. Fear Complications There was a brief flurry oi excitement among delegates over reports from Turkey thai Prime Minister Ismet Inonu hac threatened to resign after he narrowly escaped a vote of no- confidence in the Turkish Par- liament. U.N. diplomats had feared a fall of the Turkish government over the Cyprus issue mighi add new complications. Cypriot Foreign Minister Spy- ros Kypianou did not mention the Ankara developments, bin he pressed Turkish Ambassador Orhan Eralp for a direct an- swer to a question put to him (See FORCES, Page The Francis Obsfas and the Jake S c h I e i n s back front Pleasanton with their mounted deer heads from last fall's hunt ing season Sallic Dean writing friends about her busy schedule of swimming, horse back riding and the like a summer camp .Mrs. Wes Icy Vlvlon commenting on wha people did in the summer time before air conditioning Marc and Karen Bombard find ing plenty of activities to them busy M. C. Steel hammer proving to be a man of few words, but a good lis tener Cliff Berkman Jr admitting that there are times when a person's appetite isn' as great as it might seem will some local king-size serving: nallon Spies taking lime foi a friendly greeting Th artly in Catholic Cemetery No. Scheumack was driving west m Sabine and Mrs. Marbach's msband, Anton, was traveling lorth on Moody when the two :ars collided. City Patrolman Jteve Goynes said the Scheu- mack car, with its left side ilashed by the grinding impact, 'eered into the northwest cor- ner of the intersection where it  tep toward equal opportunities or all Americans." "I congratulate senators ol both parties who worked to nake passage (lie 'resident said in a statement is- ided immediately on learning he 73-27 .vole approving the ong-debated issue. "No single act of Congress -an, by itself, eliminate dis- "rimination and prejudice, hal- ed and injustice." Johnson ;aid. Looks Forward "But this bill goes further to nvest fjie rights of man wild he protection of law than any egislation in this he said. President Johnson said hi ooked forward to the clay when he bill becomes law. "That will bo a milestone America's progress toward fill ustice for all her citizens. Board Consensus He said the civil rights mea lure was the product "of i broad national consensus tha every person is entitled to jus ice, to equality, and to an even chance to enjoy the blessings o iberly." Integration leaders. Friday night hailed Senate passage d the civil rights bill as "an ac of'good will and reconciliation' and "the greatest single triump for human rights In our country since the Emancipation Proc lamation." Roy Wilkins, executive secre- tary of the National Association for the Advancement of Colorei People, said: "Today is a gooc day for our nation, ris well as if. Negro citizens." Rights Protected Wilkins said enactment of thi bill means lhat the "legislative branch has finally hospital and was laken to the and provided the means lo prc 'ntensive care unit. lect the constitutional rights o Robert Schauer of Southamp- Negro American citizens ton said he and two nephews -1-1-1- talked with (he Bayhs at the years ago by the executive ant! judicial branches of the govern ment. James Farmer, national di rector of the Congress of Racia Equality, spoke of the bill as at act of good will and reconcilia tion. "It may well be Ihe slngl. most important act of our Con gross in several decades am (See LBJ, Page 6) Ralph Si, Tower No WASHINGTON (AP) Sen Ralph Yarborough, D-Tex. voted for the civil rights -hi which the Senate passed Friday 73-27. Sen. John Tower, R-Tex voted against the bill. Johnson Serves Notice On Communists in Asia SAN FRANCISCO (AP) President Johnson, a thunderous picion.' her strength the subject of sus- welcome still. echoing in his ears, served notice Friday night on Communists in Southeast Asia that America will "defend freedom wherever necessary.' Johnson sounded this somber note after receiving an enthusi- astic welcome from some 000 Californians as he rode through tte streets of San Fran- cisco. In a speech prepared for a Democratic fund-raising dinner, the President said: "There are still these who believe they can violate their neighbor's borders and steal their neighbor's free- dom. There'are still those who refuse to accept the standards and the laws which the inter- national community nas' devel- oped." Johnson followed up this obvi ous reference to the Communist Senate. Chinese and the Red regime In North Viet Nam by saying: "As long as these men persist in disturbing the international peace, we must Insist on pre as I am President, I intend lo see that America's defense can never be the object of doubt or V Johnson said this strength Is maintained "not to Jnllmidate others but to show ethers that we cannot be to incite our enemies but to in- dicate our intention to defend freedom wherever necessary." Johnson came to California on Friday morning on a fund-rais- ing, mission for the Democratic party, Hatless, Johnson stood in an open car and waved in response to cheers of massed crowds on a motorcade from the airport to dedication of the new million Federal Building. Johnson put his political bless- ing on Pierre Salinger, who served as presidential press secretary until he resigned (o run successfully for the Demo- cratic nomination for UK U.S. Salinger stood beside Johnson as he rode through the streets. Gov. Edmund G, Brown, a Democrat who backed State Controller Alan Cranston serving our power. And as long against Salinger, rode In the presidential car. Democratic leaders assured the.President Uut Kan of the bitter primary have been heale and the party is united for th November push. In a busy day Friday, John son inspected top secret E< wards Force Base in South ern California's desert; too part In groundbreaking cere monies at Concord for a hug rapid transit system; and ded cated San Francisco's new Fej eral Building. All this preceded a a-plate, fund-raising dinner Fr day night in San Francisco (See JOHNSON, Page No Bidders For Brevity The day of reckoning has apparently not yet arrived In Victoria. Not n single store in the city, nlns; has stocked the new topless swimsuits for women. Moro's the plly, not a sin- gle request has been made hero for the lun-ln-lhe-sun fashion that is destined to outstrip the bikini, accord- ing to n revealing survey by Tlic Advocate. "No, we don't have any on ono department store manager saltl, "al- though we will be able to order them i( we have any requests. "But I'm nol sure Vic- toria is ready for this sort of Ihing ho added. "I can't Imagine them going over very well a( the coun- try club." A saleswomen at another store was more ojillmislic, saying sho wouldn't be sur- nrlzed to see a few hold and amply-endowed bosoms emerge at any fline. Final Approval Due by July 4 WASHINGTON (AP) The Senate on Friday night passed he civil rights bill containing strong new barriers to racial lias in employment, public fa- cilities, businesses anil federal aid programs, The action climaxed a 15-week struggle the longest debate in Senate history. Tlio measure now goes back to the House, which passed ba- sically the same bill four months tigo, 230-130. Southerners there have vowed a last-ditch tight, but the odds appear heav- ily weighted against them. House leaders expressed cer- (ainty thai tho revised version will be on President Johnson's desk in time for his signing on July 4, Independence Day. Reps. Emanuol Celler, D- N.Y., and William M. McCul- loch, R-Ohio, who ied the'bipar- tisan fight for Ihq House ver sion of the bill, said they favor accepting tho Senate package nd no effort will be made by roponents for further changes. The Senate made over 100 hanges in tho House bill, most- y minor, and the package was n effect n substitute. The main hanges revised the enforce- nenl machinery to give states yilh their own public accommo- "atlons and fair employment aws a limited period in which o handle complaints. The Sen- ate also put greater emphasis voluntary compliance and omewhat curbed tho new pow- rs the bill would give the at- orncy general. Climax On 83rd Day The mighty legislative battle closed in its Mrd day after the Senate's longest filibuster 75 lays was broken on June 10 iy invoking debate-limiting clo- Unplatted Area Buildings Okayed Two buildings on unplatted properly got quick approval "rom City Council In a called session Friday afternoon, but In jolh areas councilmen said jlans will have lo bo made in ncar< future for the planning of .access Both buildings wore approved subject to compliance with all building codes and final en- dorsement by Inspector A. E. Haschke, and In the case of an addition to Blue Ridge Manor apartments council required Jiat W. L. LOVD and associates provide a c-lnch water line and a fire hydrant. The other building approved was for Elliott Johnson, lo be constructed on a lot at 3301 Bloomington Road. Harry Slolnick, appearing again to request permission lo close an alley In the Ed Slot- lick Subdivision off Juan Linn Street failed to get immediate approval after Coimcilwoman Bea Martin raised n question as, to who vy quid owji., the alloy if the clly granted 'a quit claim deed. Members of the council nnc Slotnick said they prcsuma that abutting property owners w o u 1 d share ownership, bin Mrs. Martin requested a delay until this point can be clari- fied. In other action, former Coun cilmnn J. E. Weatherly Jr., was named to succeed the late T 0. Miracle on the board o! cqnllization. Other members nrc Charles Vlllarrcnl and John Smock. Libel Judgment Awards to Walker FORT WORTH, Tex. (AP) Former Maj. Gen. Edwin A. Walker won an libel judgment on Friday against The Associated Press, in con- nection with stories about activities during the 1962 segre- gation riot at the University of sociaiion. Walker, In his complaint isked million for damage to lis reputation as a result o he AP dispatches from tho Ox ord, Miss., campus, and an nd Illlonal million in punitive damages against the news as Mississippi. He had asked dam- ages of million. A District Court jury of four women and eight men delib- erated two hours and 15 min- utes in finding The AP guilty of falsely describing Walker as assuming command of student rioters and leading (hem in a charge against U.S. marshals on the university campus Sept. 30, 1962. The AP's general manager, Wcs Gallagher, said In a state- ment following the verdict: "The Associated Press will ap- peal the verdict of the jury In this case. In the light of the evidence presented by both sides The Associated Press is confident that the verdict will not be upheld on appeal." Walker said (he jury verdict justified his position against The AP and various newspap- ers as an outgrowth of the rioting nearly two years ago over the admission to the Uni- versity of Mississippi of James H. Meredith, a Negro. Two persons were killed in the wild campus disorders. The Fort Worth suit was the first to come to trial. After a nine-day trial, tha icgan June B, the jury recolvct he case at p.m. Thursday They took time lo elect Wav erly L. Johnson, a clly recrea ional employe, as Ihcir fore- (Sce WAl.KICR, Pnge SUNDAY PREVIEW Victoria's Shakespeare Festival will open Friday eve- ning with tie first of 12 of "A Midsummer Mgbt'j Dream." For a story on the cast, Including acton from far and near, as well a  lecture them on racial measures about which Ihcy said the Northerners are ignorant. A few of the Southern sena- tors were required lo sit in si- lence because they had used up the hour allotted lo each sena- tor for speaking since cloture was imposed nine days ago. Most of the final speeches were by ;i succession of Sena- explaining why they (.See (HIX. Page (i) tors Today's Chuckle A certain type of person doesn't have money (o burn, but lie can still find n way lo keep IIic pot boiling. GOLDWATER FIRM Strategists See Rights As Campaign Issue WASHINGTON (API-Repub- lican strategists generally agreed Friday lhat Sen. Barry Goldwaler's opposition will make the civil rights bill an overriding campaign Issue if he wins the GOP presidential nom- "nalion. Parly leaders arc in agree-! menl also that, regardless ofj the motives that dictated the Arizona senator's stand, he is .aking a course likely to con- solidate behind him whatever Northern white voters are an- jcred by Negro street demon- itrations and segregationists in the South. To these presumably would be added tha support of those op- posed to big government, and stales rights conservatives in all sections of (he country. Few outside Goldwater's own can defoat as> of now. ian discrimination in public ac- commodations and employment "fly in the face of the Constitu- tion" and would lead to creation of a "police slate." He added hat if his vote was miscon- strued, "let me suffer the conse- quences." His chief rival for the nomi- (Sce ISSUE, Page 8) THE WEATHER camp believe ho President Johnson But there is considerable feel- Ing that the only way he could make a respectable contest out of it it would be to follow'the course on which he has em- barked, Goldwalcr said he opposed the bill because provisions to Clear to partly cloudy and warm Saturday through Sun- lay with southerly winds 12 to 25 m.p.h. Expected tempera- ures Saturday: High, 93; low, 77. South Central Texas: Partly cloudy Saturday and Sunday, iigh Saturday 90-102. Friday temperalures: High 91; low, 78. Tides (Port O'Connor Low Saturday at p.m. and high at p.m. with Sunday low at a.m. and high at Sunset Saturday Sunrise Sunday Information based on dita I rom U.S. Weather Bureau Victoria Office. (See WeaikM   

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