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Advocate Newspaper Archive: June 18, 1964 - Page 1

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Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - June 18, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 42 TELEPHONE HI VICTORIA, TEXAS, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 1964 Established 1MI U.S. Officials Hint of Attack On Viet Cong Unrest in Laos Linked Politically to Viet Nam WASHINGTON officials said Wednes- day the United States is. keeping open the possibility of hitting North Viet Nam hard enough to force it out of the guerrilla war in South Viet Nam and the fight- ing in Laos. what form this strike to the north would take _..... ---------tand Last Ditch Anti-Rights Tries Fail Passiige Seen This Week WASHINGTON (AP) The Senate on Wednesday night turned back a last round of Southern amendments and cleared the way for passage o( the historic civil rights bill by the end of the week. A cheer started up from the chamber when Sen. Strom Thur- mond, D-S.C., announced he had called up liis last proposed revision. The cheer was quickly muted and {lie proposed amend- ment, like 36 others by Thur- mon< id and more than 100 by other Southerners, was defeat- ed. 2 Party Draft Then, quickly, the Senate leaders ordered a vote on the version of the bill drafted by leaders of both parties. A sub- stitute for the bill passed by the House on Feb. 10, it retains the basic features of the civil rights legislation originally proposed, but puts, more .stress, on volun- tary compliance. This was adopted 76-18, wilh all the opposition coming from Dixie. Closing the dying South- ern attack on the measure, Sen. Richard B. Russell, D-Ga., charged the substitute is "pure- ly a sectional bill aimed at (he South" and "is more obnoxious' than the House version. "Any way you look at he declared, "it is a second efforl at Reconstruction." No Sectionalism But the bill's floor manager, Asst. Democratic Leader Hu- bert H. Humphrey of Minneso- ta, said wasn't one scin- tilla of regionalism or section- alism" in the drafting of the measure. Adoption of the substilule shut off all further amendments ant! the Senate then adjourned foi the night. Leaders spoke of the possibil- ity of a vote on final passage Thursday night, but this will de- pend on how much time is spent on last-minute oratory. Adoption of cloture last Wednesday stripped the Soulh- (See SENATE, Page 12-A) the circumstances that vould bring it about were nol slated. But one condition could be a conclusion that the North Viet- namese role in both areas is be- ing'stepped, up and the risks of dealing wilh it through a strike to Ihe north would be less than nol doing so. The official, sources, discuss- ing this, said for the time being :he situation has settled down a bit in Laos and the antiguerrilia campaign in South Viet Nam is not losing and perhaps making some headway. Withdrawal Ruled Out The officials ruled out U.S. vithdrawal from South Viet lain and said it is important to resist the Communist encroach- ment on Ihe Plaines des Jarres of Laos. In the view of U.S. strategists, :he South Viet Nam and Laos situations are interrelated; both in a military sense and in Ihe jsychological impact of evenls in either place. Thus the Communists cannot be allowed to treat the Plaine des Jarres, which they overran in May, as something which is [heirs and bargain over what is left, il was slated. Tact Violated The U.S. officials sketched Mrs. John II. Morgan of Har- lingen motoring through from Fort Worth and gelling in a brief visit with friends Jack Bowman and son, Jac, "bach- ing" it or a short while and promising Mrs. Bowman a sink full of dirty dishes when she returns today Mrs. Mary Wofford getting ready for the annual birthday party in honor of Mrs. J. W. Stevenson at Pow- er Home from 4 to 6 p.m. this Sunday Mrs. Edna Kite stopping for an early lunch Marc Ardoin of the Key Club reminding members that they are selling tickets to the Shake- speare Festival and they may call HI 3-2031 Mrs.-J ok n Artero taking good natured hum or about her black eye, which her child accidentally injured Herschel Jordan due in Beau mont today on business Tommy Urban at home recup- erating from pneumonia and missing his ball games Police Chief John Guseman lak- ing time out for a coffee break A. J. Tibllettl now in Room 537 at Santa Rosa H o s- pilal.San Antonio, after surgery and doing nicely Lawrence and Cora Fishbeck back froir a fishing trip In the Gulf and describing some extra large waves, adding that their b o a i did prove seaworthy Aon and Allene Lassmann celebrat- ing an anniversary this week Mrs. Helen Kandic to mark a birthday today and the Httwtgs marking a 28th earlier in UM week, Ihis picture: The have been violating the Geneva ac- cords on Laos' independence and neutrality ever since they were signed in 1962. The May Pathet Lao-Viet-jMinh offensive on the Plaines des" Jarres was carefully prepared and was not a result of a previous right-wing coup in Vientiane. The United Slates has no need to apologize for its recon- naissance flights over Laos, un derlaken at the request of neu tralist Premier Souvanna Phou- ma. The armed U.S. escorls the photo planes fire only when fired upon. Bombing a Mystery It is unclear who bombed Red headquarters at Khang Khay. The Red Chinese claimed their cullural'eenler there was hit, bul there were no U.S. oper- ations on June 11, the day of the alleged atlack. And Wash- ington does not know of an al- lack then by Laolian T28 planes. North Viet Nam, in addition to helping the Pathet Lao in Laos, has been using corridors through Laos to support the Communist Viet Cong guerrillas in South Viet Nam. The United States will contin- ue to assist the Saigon govern- ment. In Ihe diplomatic field, (he United States sees merit in Po- land's proposal for a six-nation conference attended by repre- senlatives from Britain, the Soviet Union Poland, India, Can- ada and Laos. Washington hopes this would pave the way for resumption of International Control Commission inspections in Laos and pinpoint Commu- nist violation of the Geneva pact. This, in Ihe U.S. opinion, would enable diplomatic pres sure to be mounted against Ihe Communists to end their viola- tions of the Geneva accords anc cause them lo pull back from their Plaine des Jarres con- quests. The Soviet Union, however, has recently indicated it is lesi interested in Ihe Polish proposal than previously. U.S. officials do not know what might be causing Mos- cow's dwindling enthusiasm The Russians are not believed to have ambitions for control in Soulheasl Asia, but may wish to avoid opposing Ihelr Commu- nist colleagues there. Peking and Hanoi are demanding an other 14-nation conference. Fine of Levied at Port AeVocite New. Strvki PORT LAVACA Louis Cal vin Bell entered a plea of guilty before County Judge Howarc Hartzog here Wednesday anc was assessed a fine on 10 counts of contributing to the de linquency of a minor. He was required to pay court costs on one count. The charges resulted from _ beach party Nov. 8, 1963, after which one teenager died u the result of a car accident. 32 TREED INDIAN Smajstrla, chairman of the Victoria County 4-H camp being held at the Wood Hi School, and Larry Tail, who is dressed as Injun Joe, prepare Wednesday afternoon for the Sadie Hawkins race the club members presented for friends and guests at a "Dog Patch Party" dur- ing the evening. Injun Joe lost the practice race. See Page 14 for related pictures. (Advocate Photo) Officers Elected On Child Project The Rev. Roy Tomlinson, pas- tor of First Christian Church, Wednesday was re-elected pres- ident of the governing board for Area Project- on Retardation, successor to Ihe Hope School Board. Attend Rodeo Advocate News Sen-Ice HALLETTSVILLE Over spectators turned oul for the first performance of the an- nual State Championship High School Rodeo Wednesday night. Due lo the large number of Gulf "coast "cente'rlor Mrs. David Vess was named a new director on the board and secretary, while District Judge Frank H. Crain was re- elected vice-president and R. L. Keller was re-elected treasurer. Olher members of Ihe board are Dr. James Coleman, Ralph Glister, :.Dr. George Glover, Airs. Frailk Guitlard, Dr. Morse Hicks, W. H. Jenkins, Robert R.. Martin, Mrs, Thomas Mar- lin, Mrs. C. K. McCan Jr., Mrs. Joe Praltj and Mr. and Mrs. French Tarkington. Mrs. Wayne L, Hartman re- ported that a July meeting has been scheduled for representa- tives of the seven counties which will participate in the contestants, the first go-round is not due to be completed un- til late Thursday nighl, Accord- ing to a rodeo official, over 310 high school youths peting for honors. The first three performances Wednesday, Thursday and Friday nights are expected lo run into the early morning hours, possibly 3 or 4 a.m., while finalists arc qualifying for Saturday night's climax. night ceremonies were Stewart Lang, president of the Houston Fat Stock Show, and M. I. Boz- ka, Hallcttsvillc mayor. Rains earlier in the week made the arena slightly soft and hampered contestants in a small degree. However, with favor grounds are cxpccled to be in top shape for Thursday night's show. The lop 15 contenders In eocl capped children, at which time formulation of operating plans will begin. The proposed center woul provide psychiatric screening and counseling for retarded and otherwise handicapped children in the counties of Victoria, Cal- houn, DeWitt, Goliad, Jackson, Lavaca and Refugio. Under tentative arrangements the cenler would operate Ihe firsl year on a bucigel of Speakers during tho opening 880, will) of Ihis amount coming from the Slale Heallh Department in the form of sal- ries. The remaining provid- ing for some "cushion" 'in the budget, would come from the participating counties. Victoria is to supply 36.4 per eont of able weather conditions, the this amount, or Olher counties and Ihcir assigned amounts include Calhoun, 12.8 per cent, DeWilt, 14.8 per cent, Goliad, 3.8 per (Sec RODEO, Page 12-A) I (Sec OFFICERS, Page M-A) Union Given Okay By Cuero Workers Excise Tax Renewed by House Vote LBJ Hails Demo Victory WASHINGTON (AP) The House decided Wednesday that Taxes on handbags, cosmetics, jewelry and furs should be kept, Tor the present. .Republicans said they discriminate against women. The House went along wilh Its Democratic leadership, which said it was not barring fulure reductions in some federal ex- cise taxes, but that all should be studied before any selections are made. Rejection of a proposal to re- duce some of these laxes came on a 207-185 vote againsl a pro- posed amendment lo a bill ex- tending levies on some com- modities and services. Reduction Defcalcd The defeated move was led by Rep. John W. Byrnes of Wisconsin, senior member of the lax-writing Ways and Means Committee and Chairman of the Republican Policy Committee. H would have reduced from 10 to 5 per cent on Jiily.J, and eliminated a year later, taxes on four ilems: Luggage which includes handbags; toilet prep- arations, including cosmetics; furs and jewelry. Voting for the reduction were 21 Democrats and 164 Republi- cans. Against it were 206 Dem- ocrats and a lone Republican, Rep. John F. Baldwin Jr, of California. t S517' scd by, the late Sen. Estes Kcfauver, D-Tenn. Another witness, Charllon G Blair, a Belfast, N.Y. attorney teslified Thursday he has helpe< arrange adoptions for 30 years and handles 35 to 40 cases a year. He said some of the natura mothers were as young as i: but most were between 21 am 32. Some of them have askc< how much they were going to get for (heir babies, he said adding; "I said, 'Nothing.' I (old them Uwy were not selling Ihelr Elizabeth Anglim, supervisor of the, Adoption Service Depart ment, Children's Aid Society Erie County, N.Y., gave the PROBEBS, 12-A) Freak Accident Injures Girl, 10 a cnr that had slopped on the of the street when Ihe car was slruck by anolher ve- hicle backing oul of a parking arcn located in fronl of Ih c store. Police said Iho top part of Ihe door frame slruck (lie girl ini her face while Ihe bollom part slammed shut, pinning her legs. A physician who was in Iho store look the girl lo the hos- pital In his personal car before an ambulance arrived. Tho cnr in which Ihe girl was gelling oul of was driven by Mrs. Nora Mae Wilson of 1206 E. Trinily SI. The driver of Ihe vehicle backing out of tho park- ing lol was listed as Mrs. Ger (See ACCIDENT, Page 12-A) Connally Forces Worked Smoothly Talks Slated On 'Report on Dam at Cliero A final step toward a favor- able feasibility report for the ?uero Dam and Reservoir on he Guadnlupc River may be :akcn in Austin Thursday when representatives of Hie Guadn- upe-Blnnco River Authority, he San Antonio River Authorly md Ihe San Anlonio City Waler Jonrd meet with Harry P. Bur- elgh, engineer In charge of the Austin office of Ihe U. S. Bur'- :ounty by county, district- ly-dislrict organization. Tho delegation's 14 votes were lounted firmly in Iho Coniial- y majority of more than thrcc- o-ono, to 644, in Ihe only esl roll call vole when the convention upheld the Stale Democratic Executive Commit- tee's refusal to seat B liberal delegation from Bjoxnr Couhly larry Maddin was chair nan of [he Victoria County dele eau o Reclamation. The report is nearly ready 'or submission to the Depart mcnl of the Interior in Wash- nglon, bul agreement quired on various sections dcal- ng on Its economic feasibility and the need for water from the oint project between the- GBRA and the SARA. The Son Antonio City Water loard has not yet entirely re- inquishcd its somewhat forlorn egal hopo of gaining some lind of claim on conservation iloragc space at newly-c o m- pletcd Canyon Dam. A j u d g- nenl- against the City Water 3oard on all points concerning Canyon was handed down lasl week afler a trial before Dlst. Judge Chares 0. BelLs of Trav Is County, but the board is go- ng ahead wilh an appeal for which little success al Ihis time s indicated. The GBRA, foreseeing a full need for all the water from -anyon Reservoir in Us own wa- crshcd, is willing lo proceed with Ihe Joint plan at Cuero but s determined to maintain its position of denying waler to San Anlonio from any olhor point on (See TALKS, Page 1Z-A) THE WEATHER Clear lo partly cloudy a n continued .warm, through Friday, wilh isolated daytime showers. Winds from the south at 12 to 25 m.p.h. Ex peeled Thursday temperatures High 91, low 78. South Central Texas: Partly cloudy and warm through Frf day wilh isolated, mostly day time showers. Highs Thursday 88-98. Temperatures Wednesday High 90, low 77. Wednesday jwecipilation: of an Inch. Total for yea dale: 13.86 Inches. Tides (Port. Lavaca-Por O'Connor high al a.m. and low at p.m. Thurs day. High at a.m. and low at a.ra. Friday. Barometric pressure at s e a level: 29.87. Sunset Thursday: Sun rise Friday: This Information bated on data Irom the IAS. Weather Bureau Victoria (gee Weitkir ElMVken, rate UA .0- year to Firm Plans Probe of Campaign irregulurilics Are Charged By HEN PHAUSK Advocate Slnff Wilier of Guada- upe Valley Cotton Mills voted 76 (o 105 In favor of letting the Textile Workers Union of Amer- ca serve as their collective bar- gaining agcnl in a government upcryiscd elccllon held Wcdnes- 'ay night. Immediately following the ote count, an attorney for the ompany said an investigation s being considered on reports instances of irregularities and nisconducl engaged in by the nlon In the organizational cam- paign. He said Ihcse reported !Ctions may have coerced em- iloyes in (he exercise of their oto nnd could have possibly con- tilijtcd undue influence that vould warrant Iho National La- ior Relations Board setting islde results of the election. A total of 313 votes were casl. Of Oils number, 32 ballots were challenged by representatives of (ho company ami the union. The union representative chal- engcd four nnd the remainder were challenged by Ihe com- pany. However, because of the large plurality of "yes" voles, Ihe challenged ballots will have no effect on Ihe outcome of the oonrd election, Clay Corley, NLHB agent who conducted the oleclion, said. The NLHB will wait tor nllon. Zae Lonlz, Victoria rancher and hardware dealer who serves as coordinator for the Connally organization In the 18lh Senato- rial District and part of the N'lnlh Congressional District, was the only one of four dele- gates lo Ihe national convenlion at Atlantic Clly named unani- mously by a congressional dls- ricl caucus which preceded Ihe Tuesday convention. The other delegates from the dislricl are Congressman Clark V. Thompson of Giih'eslen John Hancock of Whniion Coun y and former State Sen. Jim :ny Phillips of Brazoria County 3corge Barren of Yoakum, who jflve President Lyndon B. John son his second job as n schoo caclier when the President was a young man, was named as an alternate to tho national con vcntion, and Bill Bauer, Port javaca dredging contractor was selected as one of the dele ;ates at large. The congressional district cau cus was harmonious, with the exception of nn attempt on the ?arl of the liberal-voting Gal reston County delegation to the nomination of Sen Phillips as one of the nationa convenlion delegates. The Gal vcston County group was led by State Sen. A. R. (Babe (See CONNALLY, Page 12-A meeting employes would to and elect a ncgollat- busincss days (T h U r s d i y through Wednesday) for either of Hie parlies to file objections to tho results. If neither party files objections, the NLRB will certify the results by an official document called certification of results and representation. Immediately Ihereaflerwards, the Textile Workers Union will call n mass meeting of all em- ployes on Saturday, Sept. 27. At llils m nominate ing committee representing all seven departments in the plant who would then request a nego- tiation conference wilh the man- agement. During Ihe time after the re- quest for the mceling, the nego- tiating committee would arrive at a set of contract proposals. These proposals would be pre- sented to the management at formal negotiating sessions held nl n mutually acceptable place lo both parties. Upon completion of negotia- tions, the union negotiating committee will again call a mass mceling of all plant em- (Sec ELECTION, J'age 12-A) Chuckle Lady (o bank teller: "I'd like to open a joint account with someone who has plen- ty of money." RALLY PLANNED Local GOP Delegation Pleased With Prospects Victoria County Republicans came home in a triumphal mood Wednesday from the state GOP the convention in Dallas and im mediately began making plans for a mammoth Republican rally to follow the national con- vention about Aug. 1. "II will be a public affair, and we are going to try to have all the candidate: here to meet the said Counly Chairman Dean Truman. "Plans haven't been compleled as yet, but It will be Aug. I." Mrs. Frank S, Buhler, slate, GOP committeewoman from the! Ifth Senatorial District, was named one of the delegates to Ihe national convenlion where focal Republicans are sure the parly will name Senator Barry Goldwaler of Arizona as Us presidential candidate. The na- tional convention will begin July 13 in San Francisco's Cow Palace. The Dallas convention wenl solidly to Goldwater, and Tru- man said of the lone delegate tor I a parading a Scranlon banner: "He was mighty lonesome." Republicans turned out in slanding-room-only numbers in Dallas Memorial Auditorium, Truman said, al- though there were only of- ficial delegates. "It was the largest Republi- can convention in the history of Truman said, adding that the crowd and the attitude "was in sharp contrast" lo previous years when delegates were hard to come by. Speaking of the local pros- pects for the fall campaign, the county chairman said "we're going to make an all-out fight of it." Official delegates lo the Dal- las convenlion in addition to Truman and Mrs. Buhler were Mrs. Pat Knebel, Mrs. Jack Bolre, Mrs. J. W. Marrs, A. B. Elliott, Mrs. H. R. Aberoathey, Robert Campbell, Paul Atkin- son, Mrs. Homer Martin and M. V. Sandhofer. Alternates attending from Vic- were Allan T. Ivy Jones and Mrs. John Stor- mcmt.   

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