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   Advocate (Newspaper) - June 4, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 28 TELEPHONE HI Victorious Gold water Asks Unity Rocky Refuses To Quit Race WASHINGTON (AP) -Sen. Barry Goldwaler followed up his "great victory" in the Cali- fornia primary with a plea Wednesday to Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller of New York to join him in mobilizing the Republi- can party to win the White House in November. But Rockefeller, Goldwaler's narrowly defeated rival in the California balloting for 86 cru- cial GOP .National Convention voles, made it clear he is not hatting his drive for the Repub- lican presidential nomination. "I'm not dropping out of any- Rockefeller told a crowded news conference in New York. To Resume Fight He conceded Goldwater's West Coast victory and congrat- ulated him but emphasized: "I shall continue to fight for those fundamental principles on which the Republican party was found- ed and rose to apparent reference to his differ- ences with the conservative Ari- zona senator over party philoso- phy. Answering questions, he re- fused to accept the theory that Goldwaler had now virtually wrapped up the nomination. "The convention is a month off and a lot can happen be- tween now and Rocke- feller said. Leaders Divided Republican leaders, too, divid- ed sharply on the meaning oi Goldwater's California victory, "It is going to be very diffi- cult for the opposition to put to- gether any coalition (to stop him) because they don't have the delegate said for- mer Sen. William F. Knowlanc of California. He managed Gold water's California campaign. N Rep. William B. Miller of New York, the GOP national chair man, said it brought Goldwater very close to the 655 convenlion votes needed for nomination. Not A Clinch But Rep. Joseph W. Martin Jr. of Massachusetts, who has presided over five GOP conven lions, said of Goldwater's nar row win; wasn't a very goot showing. I don't think this as sures him of the nomination." Sen. Prank Carlson of Kansas said, "1C doesn't clinch it." An Associated Press survey o states still to choose delegation for next month's convention showed Goldwater will be clost to a first-ballot victory. He already has 438 first-ballo votes and 258 more delegates re- (See GOLDWATER, Page 12A City and county officials ap patently have conferred without caching a final decision on ale to the county of half a slock which the city owns next o the county courthouse and ail. Meanwhile, C o u n c ilwoman Bea KarKn said she does not relieve the city can legally dis- pose of the land. "I have read the original Supreme Court decision (con- erning an earlier cily-counly and dispute) and it clearly tales that the north half of he block is to be used 'for the wneflt of the citizens of the ily of Victoria forever' and hat it cannot be sold or par- ellcd Mrs. Martin said. "I am no lawyer, but I can she continued, "and I loh't understand how the prop- irly can be sold." Mrs. Martin apparently is the >ne member of the council who iclds this view. VICTORIA, TEXAS, THURSDAY, JUNE 4, 1964 Established 1IM 30 Cents NO DECISION YET Councilwoman Questions Legality of City Latnd Sale Mayor Kern per Williams Jr., when asked about .the legality of Ihe sale, said that "I think it is legal, it is just a matter of working out an arrangement which will not leave a cloud on the title." Williams said that Council- man C. C. Carsner Jr., a law- yer like the mayor, concurs in his view. "It isn't just our view, but the opinion of a number of other lawyers as well (lhat the property can be sold lo the Williams said. In addition to her concern as to the legality of the sale, Mrs. Martin said she is opposed lo the sale "because it (the land) is a part of our heritage and I Ihink it should be kepi." The councilwoman said she is not sure "just what sland 1 will take" eventually regarding the sale, and declined to elabo- rate further. County Commissioners Court has offered the'city fa- me half-block on the north side of courthouse square which now houses the city jaii and Central Fire Station, but is understood to have agreed verbally that the fire station would not have to be moved for at least 20 years. The city, reportedly, wants this commitment in writ- ing regarding the fire station. Commissioners say they need the space where the jail is lo- cated, corner of Forrest and Bridge streets, to build a new county office and courts build- ing. The land has been appraised at the figure which the county has offered, but city officials earlier have said that Ihe purchase price will not begin to cover the tost of re- placing the jail and fire station facilities. Bauer Revises Bid on Jetties By MARY BAKER I'HILUPS Advocate Staff Writer PORT LAVACA Bauer Dredging Co. of Port javaca has advised the U. S. Corps of Engineers office n Galveston that there is an alleged error in the bid submitted for completion of the construction of the jet- ties in the Matagorda Ship Channel and has re-sub- mitted its bid with the corrected figure. The new fig- ure wasn't disr.'u.jeci. Observers Spot Hurricane Sign' MIAMI, Fla. (AP) The Weather Bureau said Wednes- day that the firsl tropical de- pression of the hurricane sea- son had formed in the north- western Caribbean. The depression, first solid stage in the development of a tropical storm, is drifting slow- ly northeastward, the bureau said. Conditions arc favorable for development, it added, but the depression is not expected lo be- come a tropical storm within the next 18 hours. Highest winds so far have been 25 miles an hour. The bad weather was centered about 600 miles southwest ol G. J. Mitcheletti of Galves- on, chief, technical liaison >ranch, Wednesday confirmed he Bauer bid is being reviewed and will be sent to Dallas and Vashington offices with their indings. He slated that Wash- nglon would make the decision as to (lie contract award, based on the findings of the Galveston office. The decision whether lo accept the revised figure or to award the contract to the sec- ond low bidder will rest with the chief engineer., Lowest of Foitr Bids The Bauer bid of was the low of four bids sub- milled in the bid opening ses- sion held at the Galveston of- fice May 27, ranging to a high of submitted by Mc- Namaru Corp. of Toronto, Can- ada'." The Bauer bid was over million below the government estimate of The second low bid of 115 was submitted by Brown and Root Co. and Morrison Cnudson of Houston. Mitchelletli said the secom ow bidder was "in the picluri 'cry definitely. Right now we are going to review the Bauer ubmission and relay our find ngs lo 'the Dallas office." New Bids Called Bids for the new conlrac vere called following the Mar 27 termination of the contract awarded Nolan Broth ers of Minneapolis, Minn, prime contractors for the initia contract. The termination wa ;ermcd for "the convenience o !he government." The new con ract will involve a marine in (See JETTIES, Page 12A) Miami, just off the Yucatan have been settled out of cour Peninsula, the bureau said. The hurricane season official- ly began Alonday. Tip Peyton reminding boarc members of Junior Achieve ment of a board meeling p.m. Friday, Victoria Bank am Trust Co. Larry Ravert, Paul Tindel and Bob House making a threesome on the golf Jurors Released District court civil case scheduled for trial Thursda and prospective jurors schedulec to report for jury duty need no appear, Dist. Judge Frank H said Wednesday after Crain noon. School Fund Distribution Stays Same Apportionment of s c h o o unds during tho decade from 955-56 through 1964-65 has re mained about static in Victoria ndependent School District yith instructional costs (salaries and supplies of teachers) con uming the major portion. In the 1955-56 budget of instructional costs amounted to 72.32 per cent o lie budget, according lo figures ust released by the administra ion; and of tliis amount 5.47 3er cent went for supplies. fn the newest budget, just ap jroved this week by trustees he instructional cost amount: o 70.89 per of which 2.83 per cent will g or supplies. Debt Service The next largest percenlag allotment is for debt service (re ire ment of bonds) which w i I amount to per cent of th 1964-65 budgel, or 0 this amount will be pai on Ihe principal while will be interest charges. In th 1955-50 budget, debt service cosl amounted to 9.8 per cent. Operation of the school plant (electricity, gas, water and sew ;r and other utility items) wi consume G.C per cent of the 196 65 budget, amounting to as compared with 6.3 per cent in 1955-50. Maintenanc of the plants (janitorial ser ices, repairs and general mail tenance) amounts to 3.8 p e cent of the total budget fo 1964-65, totaling as con pared with 3.36 per cent a de ade ago. Supply Cost Administration costs, salar; and supplies of the superinte dent and his central staff whic includes the business manage (See FUND, Page 12A) School Tax lates Set In Yoakum Advocats News Service YOAKUM The Yoakum school Board set rates on as- essed personal property valu- tions Wednesday night. Three new items that were ot assessed before, but wilt ow be included with other pcr- flnal property are fertilizer railers with tanks, valua- iun; tank "machines, and itrogeh tanks, Rates set on farm animals re for horses and mules 100 for bulls; cows; 'cartings; calves; rags; sheep; and !oe Jarmon, school fax asses said these are the same ales used by DeWitt County. Other rates were set foi trailers and tractors one-third of cost; merchandise and notes, 40 per cent; scooters i35; boats, 25 per cent; motors 25 per cent; television sets, and color television sets, The board also set the rale on cars. Cars over 10 years ok (See TAX', Page ISA) Cuero Girl Crash Victim Advocate Newi Service YORkTOWN C a r I y n Oehlke, of Cuero died late Wednesday night from injuries received In a one- car wreck about six miles from Yorklown on the Dobskyvillc Farm Road. Miss Oehlke was Ihe daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Oehike of 507 W. Clayton Street, Cuero. Details of how (he wreck occurred were unavailable early Thursday morning but it was reported lhat the car left Ihe farm road and over- turned. Four residents of York- town were also In the car. Two of them, Evangeline Zitlonlz and Marilyn Jon- ischk'es, were taken to Yorkfown Memorial Hospi- tal. They reportedly suffer- ed only minor injuries. Also In the car were Rayon Semper and Rodney Boldl. The wreck happened at about p.m. Funeral arrangements are pending at Freund Funeral Home in Cuero. luby Balks At Taking Medicine Family Fears Poison Plot DALLAS (AP) Jack Ruby on't take Uie medicinfi pre- ribed by psychiatrists for his ental condition, a doctor said ednesday. Dr. J. M. Picard, Dallas Coun- medical officer supervising e medication recommended by ychtatrists, said the 53-year- d condemned slayer refused 'uesday and again Wednesday take pills. Drugs Including a tranquilizer, orazine, are included In the oposed treatment, "He said he was feeling all ght and that if he needed any- ing lie would let us ckard said. Family Upsc( The Dallas Times Herald uoted an unnamed source close Ihe Ruby family as saying ey are "very upset because he lls them someone Is trying to oison him with the pills." Pickard said "I don't know hat he has told his family." No edication has been admlnis- red to Ruby sinco an authorl- ation by Dist. Judge Joe B. rown for jail cell treatment londay, Pickard said. Dr. Hobert Slubblefield, cotirt- ipointcd psychiatrist, decliuec i say how Ruby's refusal mighl ller Ihe planned treatment. Court Orders "I am under court orders-nol discuss anything about this matter until Ruby, is dismissec as a patient from my tubblefield said. Dr. William R. Beavers, re- ained by the Ruby family to rescribe treatment for Ihe aiding former night club oper- (or, said however, Ruby wild not be forced to take Ihe nigs. Meanwhile, Ruby's lawyers aid the resignation of Dr. Hu iert Winston Smith a chief coun- el would not delay defense of- orls to secure a sanity hearing or the defendant. Shows Cause Hearing The judge has ordered a hear- ng June 19 on whether to hole sanity trial. Smith, a University of Texas )rofessor, became Ihe Uilro chief lawyer lo of the case late Tuesday. In a two-page hand-written clter, Smith said he had enlcrec he case only to help gain new scientific .evidence, and was now returning (a his academic work "It must be realized that the caso has now reached an appca itage where purely legal qucs- ions will need lo be rcyiewet iver a considerable-period o he said. "I feel tha vhatever unique mission I may lave had has now been complct ed. I must qualify myself fo re urn to my academic obligations n sustaining myself and my "amlly." Smith entered the Ruby case without fee last April. Earlier, the Ruby family fircc San Francisco lawyer Mclvir Belli after sentence; lo death in March tor killin. Lee Harvey Oswald, accused as sassin of President Kennedy. Noted Houston criminal law yer Percy Foreman took th case but promptly withdrew ii apparent disagreement with th family on how to conduct th case. Smith's withdrawal leaves o: the defense staff Phil Burleso and Joe Tonahill, who hav worked the case since shorll; after Ruby was indicted. No Tax Changes Seen by Mayor In New Budget Three Democrat Posts Are. Contested in Runofj Today's Chuckle There's probably nothing wrong with (lie younger generation thnt the older generation didn't outgrow. SYSTEM DRAWS PRAISE 12-Point Outline Made for Schools course early Henry Clay Koontz passing out cigars that say "It's a Boy" The Fred Boles and son, Mike, off to Mountain Shadows, Scottsdcde, Ariz., for a vacation trip Gordon Wendel visiting h i s grandparents, the Francis Ohs- tas, while his parents are on vacation Mrs. W, D. Gentry at DC Tar Hospital after recent surgery Mrs. R. G. Teague in town from Goliad Milton Killehrew never too busy to share a little knowledge with a friend Mrs. J. M. (Shorty) Loyd admitting that there are some homemaking arts s h e is Evaluates for the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools found Vic- toria Independent School Dis- trict "decidely superior" in the provision of elementary school libraries, with "all resources of riculum other points on which the local district of the reading program, qualifi- cation of the science faculty, junior high grammar instruc- tion, junior high and high school mathematics programs, and over-all foreign language cur- Die instructional program focused upon the individual stu- and at the same time laid out 12-polnt outline of meas- schools- The panel of educators, headed by Dr. Frank Hubert of the University of Houston as chief consultant, spent a week early in May studying the local school system. In a report on their findings more talented at doing than oth- filed with Supt. C. 0. Chandler ers E. R. l.khoovtky hav- this week, the panel said that ing a hard time keeping up with "many outstanding programs" friends and relatives Mrs. were observed in operation. B. C. Andrews combining a High morale of the faculties shopping trip and a visit with availability of teaching ma- friends, (erials and equipment, adequacy was praised. Turning to areas for improve- ment, the report made its most ures which they said might significant recommendations in be taken to improve the local (he areas of teacher prepara- tion and the teaching of social As for teacher preparation, he report said that "In a few areas, mainly in the elementary schools" there is a need for ieachers to take refresher courses in subject matter areas to which they are assigned. It also said that more exten- sive effort should be directed in English language arts pro- grams to improve vocabulary and strengthen students' ability to "discriminate between fact and opinion." The full text of the committee recommendations for local "should provide not only acquisition of knowledge and but also should focus attention of the student upon his applica- tion of the principles involved In his school and community relationships." studies. More emphasis should be de- voted (o definition and achieve- ment of "specific objectives" in social studies, the report ________...........____ said, and these objectives MENT: The following summary plete and effective use. Tcac eis should be trained, or shou prepare themselves, to these teaching aids on a broad scale in several areas of instrii tion. Training periods should 1 scheduled at appropriate tim during the pre-school oriental program or as a part of t) regular In-servicci program the school year- 2. In a few areas of instru tion, mainly in Ihe clcmcnta school, evidence indicates t need for teachers to take r fresher courses in the sublet Includes a Ust of programs or areas of instruction where plans understanding of the subject for revision and Improvement should be Instituted: 1. The available supply of leaching aids, materials, and LEONA'S DAUGHTER Leona Gage made news a couple of years ago when she won the Miss U.S.A. title and then was disqualified for having been married. She was in. the news again this week when a baby sitter brought her daughter, Cynthia Ann, to a North Hollywood police station. Tho baby sitter said the child was left with her on May 2, and lhat she had not seen Mrs. Gage since that time. The mother later turned up in Scotls- dale, Ariz. Cynthia Ann is shown with a police matron. (AP Photo) Only three local races and one of these of a county-wide alure will bo on tlio ballot aturday when Democrats go to 10 polls in primary runoff elec- on. With one exception, voting will ast-Miuute 3arbs Hurled 11 Campaign By THE PKKiS Republican U.S. Senate can idotes joined Wednesday in raising U.S. Sen. Barry Gold Mter's California presidential rimary victory but continued o swap needling .statements on ical issues. In the Democratic runoff con- esl for congressman-al-large tohert Baker criticized his op onent, U.S. Rep. Joe Pool, as n extremist and as irresponsi ?lc while Pool told a San Angelo ally his firsl primary success csullcd from his lack of fear o discuss campaign issues. George Bush campaigned in ils hometown of Houston, where le told a coffee group Gold valor's victory is "great news o all Texans and Americans.' The Senate candidate also varned his supporters to "be cady for any last minute wile harges and smears that wil omc loo late in the campaign o give an opportunity to expose im." Jack Cox, Bush's opponent In he GOP runoff, hailed Gold water's showing and predicted he Arizona senator's succcs. 'will be a great boost to m> >wn candidacy. 1 have stood a Hie unquestioned conservalivi candidate throughout thi race." in Hie same locations as 1 e May 2 primary. In olcctio rcclnct'Mo. 10, voling will b Smith Elementary School in ead of Victoria High Scboo o box will operate fii Electlo recinct 31. The primary race on the ba t will be the race S epresenlallve at large whic ts incumbent ;Joo Pool alias Bgainst Robert W. Ba! r of Houston In a slate -wk onlest. Locally, the races are: For constable of Commission rs' Precinct No. 1. in' whic B. llamroack, the lead In ole-geltcr in the primary ra ices Victor Alkek. Voters he following election prccinc ill decide tho race: No. 1, N No. 3, No. 4, No. 5, No. o. 7, No. 8, No. 12, No. 13 an o. 14. For drainage commissione tislrlct No. 4, In which U xmdlik and J. If. Matchctt se he post after trying In the pri- mary. Only Crescent Valley ommunity voters will decide his race and the only box in- olved is No. 14. THE WEATHER school improvement is as fol- matter areas of their asslg ws. ment. This is largely'a respo AREAS FOR IMPROVE- Partly cloudy to cloud Thursday and Friday. No Im "xjrtant change fn temperature Southeast winds fl to 18 m.p.l Expected Thursday tempera tures: High 90, low 65. South Ccnlral Texas: Parll cloudy Thursday through Fr day. No imporlanl lempcralur change. High Thursday 85-95. Temperatures Wednesday High 88, low 63. Tides (Port Lavaca For O'Connor Highs at a.m. Thursday and er, but the school district should make a periodic review of the Friday. Lows at p.m. Thur academic courses and other ex- day and a.m. Friday, pel-fences gained by the (each- Barometric pressure at se Ing (acuity and the admlnUtra- level: 29.96. tiva staff. 3. In Uie English-language arts rise Friday: various audio-visual equipment program reading in should be put to a more com- Page 12A) Sunset Thursday: Sun This Information on dj iTom Ihe U.S. Victoria mprovmg Jark Areas 3n Agenda Any Increases To Be Minor By TOM E. KITE Advocate Staff Writer City officials have begun York on a 1064-65 budget ex- wcled lo bo little changed the fiscal document under the city Is now operating. No change In the tax rale is oreseen. Mayor Kemper Wil- 'ams Jr. said Wednesday. Although Ihe budget planning s in the first stages, with de- artmental requests not yet in o City Manager John Lee and "Inance Officer Tom L. Davis, fficials were polled about the Budget on the basis of a remark iy' Williams at the Monday :ouncil meeting.. During a discussion of a from Victoria Bronto 'ubllc Library for additional units, Williams sold that no peclfic commitment could be node at this time "because here are 'several other new terns coming up" this year. Asked Wednesday to elaborate on this, Williams said that "we vant lo do somelhing about im- iroving our .park and islcd specifically, "better llght- ng" DeLedn plaza .own and Memorial Square, where tho Old Dutch Mill and ;he steam locomotive' are loca- ted. He said also that "there will 30 a request for an increase in for. the City Parks and "lecreatlon Commission which operates -Victoria Children's Zoo and a dozen other play- ground areas. No Firm Figure Commissioners discussed this Informally with the mayor at Ihe parks and recreation meet- Ing which preceded the Monday council session, but no firm figure was staled. A check with Davis concern- ing prospective reve- nues indicated Wednesday that any budget Increases will be nominal, however. Davis said the city probably will pick up at least million in new as- sessed properly valuation this year, but won't gain anything like Ihe which was added last year when the new generating station of Central Power and Light Co, was added to the tax rolls. Davis said that the increase is a conservative esti- mate, so the city might pick up as much as in new For precinct chairman of Elo ion Precinct No. 8 :S h i o 1 d s ichool box) in which Don Hoov- r and Lorenzo Hinojosa are op- wnents. Polls will open at 8 a.m. nnd lose at 7 p.m. valuations. The latter amount, however, would odd only about of actual revenue. To Top Estimate No substantial increase is ex- peeled from any other source of revenue, either, although indi- (See BUDGET, Page 12A) SOME EXCEPTIONS Shakespearean Festival Box Offices To Open Eight box offices will open 'hursday for sale of tickets to coming performances of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and 'Taming of the Shrew" during Victoria's Shakespearean Fes- ival, but special ticket arrange- nents were announced for cer- ,ain performances. Classical Repertory League spokesmen said that tickets can ye purchased at the box offices except for dates covered in ticket sales being handled by various clubs and organizations. These special dates were listed: June 27 and July 25 perform- tickets can be obtained In area cities, these special latcs are available through the persons listed: In Cuero: July IB and Aug. 8, Mrs. W. L. Ferguson. In Port Lavaca: July 18 and Aug. 15, through Mrs. Gene Traylor. In Edna: July 17 and Aug. 14, through Mrs. 0. B. Fenner. Id Yoakum: July 10 and Aug. 7, through Calvin Matthews. Tickets for all other dates can be obtained at the eight box of- fices which will be located at Victoria and Lone Tree, Phar- tiouse by telephoning Mrs. George T. Ncedham, HI 3-4500. Aug. 1, tickets can be obtained through Junior Service League by telephoning Mrs. George Glover at HI 3-3815. through Jayceettes, Mrs. Wayne B. Leshe, HI 3-4787. July 5 and Aug. 2, tickets through Victoria -High Schoo Key Club, Ronald Davis H! aii't.'U'O, livrvcuo -kail i m J through Victoria Women's Club-rnacies Wacker'a In _Town and Country, Village Music Store, "xme Tree Drive-In Theatre, Odorless Cleaners, Uptown Theatre and HauschiM's, "A-Ml'Jsu mmer Night's Dream" will open on June 28 July 3 and July 31, tickets and continue each Friday, Sat- urday and Sunday evening through July 19. "Taming of Shrew" will open on July 24 mi continue each Friday, Saturday and Sunday evening through Aug. 16.   

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