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Advocate: Monday, June 1, 1964 - Page 1

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - June 1, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 25 TELEPHONE HI 5-1451 VICTORIA, TEXAS, MONDAY, JUNE 1, 1964 Esubluhtd 4 5 Cents Crucial Week At Hand for Rocky, Barry 260 GOP Delegates Are Slated to Be Chosen WASHINGTON (AP) Gov. Nelson A. Rocke- feller ol New York and Sen. Barry Goldwatcr oi Arizona are heading into what could well be the make- or-break week in their drives for the Republican presi- dential nomination. By week's end 260 more GOP convention delegates about 20 per cent of the lota be chosen. The biggest the om drawing the most the 86-vqte slale up for grabs on a winner-take-all basis in California Tuesday. Slates pledged to Goldwaler and Rock efeller face each olher in a showdown. There are no olhe: candidates. No write-in vole; are permitled. California Vote Near To Climax Charges Fly Anew in Race SAN FRANCISCO campaign managers for Sen. Barry Goldwater and Gov. Nel- son A. Rockefeller traded "smear" and "irresponsibility" charges Sunday as the Califor- nia Republican presidential pri- mary moved toward a climax. With the two candidates busy family matters, former William F. Knowland spoke for Goldwater and Sen. Thomas H. Kuchel for Rockefeller in a na- tionally televised clash. Knowland accused Rockefel- ler's supporters of employing smear techniques in the contest at the polls Tuesday between the Arizona senator and the Naw York governor for the state's 86 Republican presidential nomi- nating delegates. 'Changed Position Kuchel criticized what he called the irresponsibility of Delegates at Stake A Goldwater victory could touch oft a surge for Ihe senator at stale conventions to be held later in the week in Alabama, Colorado, Washington aiid Ha- waii, and other conventions later in June. A Rockefeller victory, especi- ally a big one, might keep some of those delegates on the fence. It also would give the governor control of the two largesl dele- gations, since he is expected lo win mosl of the 82 New York district delegates to be chosen Tuesday and all of 10 al-large delegates to be chosen later. Also to be decided in a pri- mary election Tuesday is who will carry South Dakota's 14 votes lo the GOP convention in uncommitted slate or one favoring Goldwaler. Busiest Week Overshadowed by the presi- dential maneuvering arc pri- maries and conventions this week which will nominate three- U.S. Chiefs Gather r For Talks on Asia 2 Negro Gangs Terrorize Train Subway Violence iu New York Follows Slaying of Teacher SAFETY PLEA Three of 24 reasons why motor- ists should use caution on West Elm Street in Hampden, Me., are Pamela 5, Paul 3, and David Good 4. The trio look over a sign their father, Robert, erected to warn drivers of: the large num- ber of children living on the street. (AP Photo) 70-MPH DRIVE Goldwater. He said his senatorial colleague, top man in convenlion voting strength at this point, has "changed his position several limes on important issues." Knowland said Rockefeller's accusations that Goldwater rep- resents an extremist clement in the Republican party are part of the "smear" he said has been laid against his candidate in weeks of bitter campaigning in the last of the major contested primaries. The former senator said lhat all ot the delegate candidates as- sembled in Goldwater behalf are GOP members who sup- ported former President Dwight D. Eisenhower and his program and who backed Kuchel in his successful senatorial race in 1952. Ducked Question gubernatorial, five senate and 95 House candidates. Going into the busiest precon yehtioh week of this 'election year, The Associated Press sur- vey of delegates already chosen shows Goldwater leading the field wilh 316. Olher totals are Gov. William W. Scranton ot Pennsylvania 71. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge 44, Rockefeller 41, Sen. Mar- garet Chase Smith 15, former Vice President Richard M. Nix 10, favorite sons 100, and un- committed 261. 655 To Win The figures represent the first- Kuchel, who ducked questions as to whether he would support Goldwaler if Goldwatcr is nomi- nated, said Ihe Arizona senator had voted against the limited nuclear test ban treaty with the statement (hat he "didn't give a linker's damn" about world opinion. "That doesn't represent re- sponsible Ku- chel said. Rockefeller, whose wife gave birth to a boy Saturday, ar- ranged to fly back to California for a 12-hour lour that will take him lo rallies at airports across the state Monday. Goldwater planned to see his (Sec VOTE, Page 12) Goldwater Plans GOP 'Summit' LOS ANGELES Barry Goldwater said Sunday lhat if he wins the Republican presidential nomination he will call party leaders including ballot lineup, based on pri mary commitmenls, instruc lions, pledges and stated prefer ences. It will require 655 votes to win the Republican nomination. District and stale conventions are scheduled for Colorado anc Washington Friday and Satur day. Goldwater supporters have >een discounting their prospects n Colorado, wilh 16 votes a stake, bill have claimed they will get 21 of Washington's The results in California couli determine the outcome at thos (See WEEK, Page 12) LBJ Wheels Car By Broken Bottle JOHNSON CITY, Tex. 'resident Johnson, at the wheel if his white sedan, narrowly ivoided running over a broken loltle Sunday while he was driving to church at 70 miles an our. The President was leading a our-car caravan through a light drizzle when he rolled snfely past the jagged glass. The Sec- Service car second behind ways of this Texas hill country, carefully observed the 70 m.p.h. spqed limit on the drive to Fred ericksburg. The bottle was sitting upright on Ihe road, wilh its neck brok en off. Agents surmissed it hat been dropped from a passing car nnd said they doubt it hac been placed there deliberately Four Secret Service ngenls, a While House photographer, anc GUESSING GAME a "summit meeting" lo map campaign strategy. FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. CAP) Many of the world's telescopes will be aimed at the moon this week by astronomers hoping to see again the miles-wide ruby spots observed at Lowell Observ- atory here twice last winter. The sightings, over half-hour lim struck the boltle and James Young, the assistan a large hole in a front lire. jWhile House physician, were The driver brought (he i" car that struck (lie ......bottle. After services in the red brick church, the Johnsons drove bad to Johnson City and visited a the home of Iho President's cou sin, Oriole Bailey, who live! next lo Ihe LBJ Ranch. The President returned d Washington Sunday night. Lyndon Talks Again Denied AUSTIN (AP) Spokesmc for President Lyndon Johnso denied Sunday, for the Uiir slraicht day, lhat Johnson plan llo talk Texas politics wilh John Connnlly. There had been unverified n ports that Connally, who is in power struggle with U.S. Sci Ralph Ynrhorough, D-Tcx., fo control of the Texas Democrat >arty, talked with Johnson du ng his weekend visit lo Toxa Both Connnlly and Yarbo borough sal on tho speaker platform et the University ,o a hall willioul incident while ,he resl of Ihe cars went on. The President and Mrs. John- son and their daughter, Lynda Bird, 20, drove from Die LBJ near here to Fredericks- burg, 20 miles to the west, lo atlend morning services at the! 3dison Street Methodist Church.! The pastor, Ihe Rev. Clifford! Edge, said, "1 almost fainted, when I saw you walk in, Mr. President." The Johnsons entered the par- lially filled church about five minutes after Ihe service began. About 150 other worshippers were present. Johnson, once accused of speeding on the winding high- NEW YORK sep-l aralo bands of Negroes terror-! izcd Brooklyn subway trains early Sunday, smashing win- dows and lights and beating and robbing while passengers. One band of about 20 or more, many reeking of alcohol, left the Irain afler their explosive outburst. The other gang of four, led by a youth carrying a meal cleaver, invaded a mo- jlorman's cab and Ihreatened to (kill him. They also threatened Ihe 25 passengers aboard that train. The larger gang was more destructive, and their violence almost sparked a racial clasl (when they left the train, i Detective Raymond Sheerin jsaid 30 to 40 white persons i poured out of their homes and a jneighborhood bar after Iho broke four store window! and burglarized ono of thi aces. Police held the crowd back tor arresting 12 of the Negroo. charges ranging from rioling robbery. Sheerin said eight li of their cohorts got away. The subway violence followci t one day the rape-murder c white school teacher, Chariot Lipsik, 38, In another Brook n neighborhood, Crow eights. There a group of Has c Jews have formed a privat ndio-car police patrol to try I nd recenl nighllimo torrorlsn Tho Iraln rtot occurred In th icepshead Bay Bensonlmn actions shortly after 2 a.m. Ai ording to the wife of one ma was beaten, it iiluslralei nee more Urn apparent apat! f New Yorkers lo come to on nother's aid While Nicholas Phlltppides, G being pummeled an tomped upon, his fellow pa engers made no attempt lo I erferc, his wife, Helen, 39, lo newsman. "Nobody got up lo help him he said. "They Just walched Mrs. Phillppides wasn't thei nit she said her husband, Brooklyn restaurant owner, to 'icr what happened. "They pulled his one pant V iff and took his wallet wilh and broke his si aid. "He tried to get out wh he train doors opened but th Iraggcd him back in ai started beating him again. "Somehow he landed on t station platform and again th Moon Watchers Hoping To See 4Ruby' Spots Gov. Nelson A. to periods Oct. 23 and Nov. 27, sparked a learned guessing game with proposed solutions In a stalemenl released by ranging from volcanic eruptions his Los Angeles headquarters, Goldwater said such a session "would demonstrate lo all Re- publicans, all Americans, a de- termination of the GOP to pre- senl a comprehensive program for progress and freedom." conference include former Pros ident Dwight D. Eisenhower, lo some strange reflective ma terial on Ihe lunar surface. The spots range from two miles to 12 miles across. Dr. John S. Hall, Lowell's di- rector, says astronomers around the world will be watching the Goldwater said those he moon closely all week but Thurs- would call lo a posl-convenlion day and Friday nights especial- ly. That's when the red-spot area of the moon near the Last winter's observations were made by a team of Air Force moon mappers, James A. Grcenacre and Edward Barr. They weren't set up to take pic- '.ures Ihey were looking ihrough an eyepiece of a 24-inch :elescope and drawing charts to ae used by U.S. astronauts when Ihey get lo the moon. The spots they saw were all In Ihe vicinity of Arislarchus, a deep crater 27 miles across. The largest spot was inside the crater near Ihe rim. The others were on smaller peaks nearby and were about 2 miles In diameter. If infrared measurements show thai the red spots arc hot astronauts might want to be former Vice President Richard large terraced crater callet M. Nixon, Senate Minority Leader Everett M. Dirksen of Illinois, House GOP Leader Charles A. Halleck of Indiana, Gov. William Pennsylvania, W. Scranton cf Romney of Michigan and Rock- efeller. be tie nearesl It has been to earth since las winter. Astronomers will be belter prepared Ihis lime. They'll have Gov. George color cameras ready and sjiccia! Infrared sensing Instruments to determine if the spots are hot. near them al night, when lunar ened miscarriage. tcmpcralurcs slide to more than 200 degrees below zero. Results of Ibis week's survcll lance may not be announced Im mediately. Hall said reports from other the hospital. observatories will have to be analyzed carefully before any conclusions can be reached. m. Ho was bleeding, his heat is bashed in, his lip anc cek were cut. Finally the con dor came and helped hin Also manhandled wore How d Weiner, 16, n (roshmnn a aten Island Community Col jo, and another Brooklyn resi nt, Harvey Vine, 20. AH three were treated fo Is and bruises at hospitals it only Weiner wns admltlec doctor said he was in fair cot lion with a cerebral cone us on and head cuts. Police said Weiner had bee t in the face with a boltto. II (Sec GANGS, Page 1Z) YISD'Budget Situation Hearing Set Public hearing on i record budget of. mare than 000 Is scheduled at 2 p.m. Monday during Ihe regular meeting of (he Victoria In- dependent School Dtslricl Board of Trustees, 'flic board meeting will begin al 1 p.m. In the art- minlslrnlion building, corner of North and Brownson Streets. Trustees hnvc Incllcnlcd Ihitt no increase In Hie dis- trict lax rule of SI.05 per SIM of assessed valuation will be necessary to meet the demands of the new budget. Increases In as- sessed valuation are ex- pected (o provide revenue to cover an estimated Increase over last year's budget. The huilgct contains pro- visions which will permit teachers lo reach Ihelr maxi- mum stale salary schedules three years early. 111 Laos Gets Worse Lodpc Still Is Hopeful Traffic Deaths Hit 29 in State By THE ASSOCIATED At least 29 persons i traffic accidents during the Icmorial Day weekend In Tex- s. Two persons drowned. The tabulation of tho holiday raffle tarled and drowning deaths at 6 p.m. Friday and Choir--Slugs Two Concerts Advocalr Ncw> Strvlct PHILADELPHIA The Vlc- :oria College Corrallers gave wo concerts Sunday, ono oi which was something ot a home coming for the choir director Mrs. Ruth Williams. The Corrallers sang religious selections ut the It a.m. servlci of Wesfside Presbyterian Church n Philadelphia, with Mrs. lams' parents, Mr. and Mrs. J R. Yenrslcy, as unofficial hosts An evening performance wa jlven at Evangelical Congrcga :lonal Church, attended by Mrs Williams' brother, William Yearsley, and his family. The singers toured Phlladol phla, including Indcpendenci Hall, in Ihe early afternoon, bn mosl managed lo gel some rest The 15 members of the choir plus adult sponsors, will leav early Monday for Garner, N.C .Kiuui, mi.. u, A concert Is scheduled at 8 p.m limped him. They stomped on'at Garner Mclhodlsl Church. through Sunday mid- The latest deaths reported in hided: Jerry Wayne Farabec, 20, o Bryson wns killed Saturday Ight lit Graham when his mo orcyclc skidded out of conlro and crashed Into a church sign. James W. Davis, 36, died Sat- urday, night when his car over- urncd on Form Road 1712 five miles north of Rockdalo. Vlclor Manuel Padron of San Anlonio wns killed and four oth- icrsons were Injured Sunday In i car-truck collision three miles lorlh ot Pearsall. Paul W. McWIllinm, 25, of HONOLULU U.S. officials began arriving Sun- day for key strategy talks on Southeast Asia. One of them, Ambassador Henry Cnbot Lodge, said Ihe situation in South Viet Nam Is coilnlnly not hopeless. Secrclnry of Slate DenirRusk, Lodge, nnd n group of lop U.S. diplomatic nnd m Hilary officials landed after a High! from Saigon in two Air Force planes. Several hours atlcr their ar- rival, Ihe situation in Laos took a turn for the worse. The pro- Communist Pnlhet Lao reported- y announced it no longer rccog- ilzes Prince Souvanna Phouma as premier ot Laos. A New China News Agency iroadcnsl monitored In Tokyo quoted Palhot Lnu Radio as sty- ng Palhct Loo loader Prince Souphanouvong demanded the snfn return of Pallid Lao mom- jors of tho coalition government n tho rightist-controlled capital of Vientiane. Rusk declined lo discuss any- Ihlng of subslanco In advance of Iho two-day session, which also will lie attended by Secretary of Defense Roberl S. McNamara nnd olher decision makers from Washington. 'Luis' on Our Side Lodge, ambassador la South Irldgcporl was killed and Ihrcc Dallas Counly residents were in- iiircd Sunday in n two-car accl- dcnl on Stale Highway 199 west of Azle in Tit r ran I Counly. Clarence Tnylor, about 60, and J. T. Roseboro, 58, were falally injured Sunday in a one-car ac- cident on U.S. Highway 80 Iwcen Longvicw nnd Hallsvillc. One olher person was hospital izcd. Jim Bonncr, 72, of Kaly was killed'Sunday in a two-car colli- sion near Houston. Clarence Edward Leggcll, 7- (Sec DEATHS, Page n) Viet Nam, refused lo ha pessi- mistic about tho situation there, pictured in some quarters u badly deteriorating. It's nol. the kind ot sllufltion for fair wcalhor snilors, Lodge said, bill "We've got a lot of cars an our side." Lodge said (here were a lot of 'subsurface factors working In our direcllon." Ho did not elab- orate. Asked aboul discussions on the losslbllily of carrying tho war Today's Chuckle A new hroom swcejn clean, hut you can have more hm wilh nn old rake. North Winds Help Clear State of Thunderstorms Texas commencement Saturda night where Johnson was tl speaker. Connnlly and Johnso ittendod a private reception fo lowing the ceremony. "The President has not see Ihe governor nor does he pla lo see him and he has not tsike wilh While House Pre Secretary George Reedy lold news briefing Sunday. Wife of Senator Enters Hospital WASHINGTON CAP) Mrs. Edward M. Kennedy, wife of Iho senator from Massachusetts, was admitted io Georgetown University Hospital Sunday with what her doctor called a threat- Ky 1IIK ASSOCIATED PRESS Clear north winds calmed Iho weather in Texas Sunday in the wake of lurbuienl thunderstorms that raked the state for two days. The downpours that moved across Ihe slale dumped up lo 5.20 inches of rain on Houston Into Saturday night. Floodwat- ers forced a number of families to evacuate their homes In the Gatcwood Addition and Ken- wood Place In the north sec lion of tho clly. Approximately 75 person! were cared for by the Rcc Cross after three to four feet o water from Green's and Hall's Bayous poured Into their homes Tho same storm stranded ap nroxlmalely 500 persons attend Ing a picnic late Saturday a ._..._., Mirror Lake near Houston when high 83. Most aflcrnoon tcmpcralurcs were in the 60s and 70s and ranged from 60 degrees at Dal- lart to 85 at Laredo. Skies were cloudy In a few ar- jas and partly cloudy elsewhere with a few Ihundershowers In Dr. William J. Cusok told a reporter [here was no .immedi- emergency. He described day. her condition as satisfactory but early spi spilal sit said. floodwatcrs covered z bridge All were conducted to safely lalcr. The flood waters receded Sun Clearing weather set in. fron he had wanted her admitted to the west as cool front moved through Ihe Panhandle am read southeastward over the Mrs. Kennedy is in an period of pregnancy, the hospital stale. El Paso had sunshine most of tho day. THE WEATHER Partly cloudy and mild Mon day and Tuesday, with norlheasl to east daytime winds 10 to 20 m.p.h Expected Monday temper atures: Low 60, high 89. South Central Texas: Parlr cloudy Monday and Tuesday. lltle warmer Monday. Precipitation Sunday: .25 Total (or year; 10.21 Inches. Temperatures Sunday; Low 65 Barometric pressure al sea level: 30.03. Tides (Port La vac a-For O'Connor High at a.m., low al Tuesday Simscl Monday, sunrise Tuesday. Information baud on data from U.S. Wwlhcr Victoria Offlw. (frM BMwIwn. li he Lower Rio Grande Valley arller in the day. Official rainfall measurements or the 24 hours ending at 6 p.m. Sunday Included Beaumont nchcs, Corpus chrlsti 1.18, Col- lege Stallon 1.15, Galvcston .71 Ijiifkin .57, Brownsville .56, Ails lln .40, Wichita Falls .46, San Antonio .44 and lesser amounts al a number of olher points. Skies were expected to contln ue clearing through Monday. The weather bureau also said temperatures will he somewhal warmer in most areas. The thunderstorms, which brought damaging hall to some areas, began tapering of( around midnight Saturday. One of the last was at Aransas Pass, near Corpus Chrlsti, where hall fell and winds gustcd at 75 mile! (n hour. Cisco, in West Texas, also was raked by a midnight hail storm. Lightning and a resultant (Ire did f damage (o the rail- road station al Basirop, south- east ol Austin. Temple reported cro. from hall In lhat area. Nearly Ihrcc Inches of rain fell within 20 minutes 10 miles east o( Tern- nlo Coin-inmlsl Norlh Viot Lodge bristled n bit nnd said: "That phrase Is so big that t moans nolhlng." Lushes Reils As McNamara nnd Ills party eft Wnshlnglon, Iho defense sec- retary charged thai Communist North Viol Nam ts'dlrccling Red aggression in Laos and South Vlcl Num. McNamnra told nowsmon thai :ho Honolulu gathering Is the Hth in a scries of meetings of Washington and field officials concerned with tho economic and military asslstimcc program for Sucrrllfn-prcsscd South Vicl Nam. He snld Iho current Pathel Lao push In Laos wos "directed and supported" by Norlh Vicl Nnm, and thai North Vicl Nam also directed and supported "tho campaign of terror in South Viet Nam." Findings and recommenda- tions of tlio strategy conference will bo reported directly lo Ihe President. A variety ot military (Sec LEADERS, Page 12) AWFUL FAST FROM 3" TO HOME ...HE WANTS TO THERE WHEN NE.WSPAPERBOY COLLECTS ip da matt Nenrlj pie. Holp your Advocate carrier- salesman succeed by having payments ready when he cnlls oy to collect. Too, please sec Ihnl your receipt Is (tiled out properly. It's the best way wa know to avert misunderstand- ing. City-Wide Dollar Days Today and Tuesday   

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