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Advocate Newspaper Archive: May 30, 1964 - Page 1

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Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - May 30, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 23 TELEPHONE HI H451 Bomber Allegedly Is Known FBI Said Shy On Evidence NEW YORK Sat- urday Evening Post reported Friday that FBI officials know who planted the explosive that killed four young Negro girls in a Birmingham, church last September, but don't have enough evidence for a convic- tion. "Law enforcement officials know who the bomber and his accomplices known for the Post reported. "But they have hot been able to put together the kind of an airtight case they need to lake 'Mr. X' to court." The Post report said police and FBI officials, who have been conducting an intensive in- vestigation since the Sept. 15, 1963 tragedy al the I6lh Street Baptist church, have enough evidence to believe lhal the 'Mr. X': Birmingham Meeting the bombing at a meeting in Birmingham two weeks before it happened. at the house of the men who planted the bomb two nights before Ihe bombing. car was parked two blocks away from the church on the Sunday morning tho bomb went off." NO Per Comment An FBI spokesman in Wash- ington said the agency would have no comment on the maga- zine's report. "Mr. X" is under constant surveillance, the Post report, by George McMillan, quoted a po- lice official as saying. "Of the official was quoted, "we can't literally stay with him 24 hours a day. Bui we put him to bed every night and check him first thing every morning. He hales us, but he hales the FBI even worse." Does Halo Jobs McMillan wrote that police told him "Mr. X" makes almost his entire living from doing jobs for hate movements, but has never been found at the scene of the Birmingham bomb- ings. "He has a distinguishing phy- sical a detec- tive was quoted as saying. The report said (hat, "At a time and place that cannot yet be revealed, a group of men in- cluding the man who made the bomb, the man who placed it who knew the those involved JOHNSON CITY, Tex. (API- Lyndon B. Johnson, president of lis high school graduating class 40 years ago, told the class of 64 Friday night he never dreamed "the road from this schoolhouse would lead to the White The chief executive, one of a class of six who graduated in 1924, expressed something of a "gee whiz" atlilude toward his present eminence in a senti- ment-sprinkled commencement address prepared for Ihis year's 30 graduate; of the school lhal and everyone idenlilies of met.' "If any one of you ever (See BOMBEH, Page 3) on Edge City Of Alert Area The {J. S. Weather Bureau of- fice at Foster Field reported Friday evening lhal Victoria was on the edge of a severe thunderstorm alert that covered a large area of South Texas. The forecast was for isolated damaging winds and hail. The alert was to last until 2 a.m. Saturday. At a late hour Friday night, tlie office reported no strong disturbances in the Victoria area. The nearest sign of strong thunderstorms on the radar wa in an area south of San Antonio. Winston Zlrjacks deciding it was a good day to accept a ride to worV. Meivin Scherer giving instructions about Ihe fin- er points of baling hay Mrs. Vclda Stout receiving a thank you note from Mexico City expressing gratitude for the bouquet of flowers placed in a local hospital room during Home Demonstration Week. The note was from the Fraine B. Rhuberrys Gary AnfersWn assuring interested persons that he did all right by his school Copley getting ready for a trip to Austin to bring her daughter home from the University of Texas J. B. Wilson doing his good deed for the day, the deed being for his wife the Nick AgaJlarj Sr. and Sylvia Agailar, joining Mrs. Johnny Aguilar and daughter Irma of San Antonio for a trip fo Lub- bock and Texas Tech for the graduation of their son, C a p t. Jesse Aguilar from that college with a degree in industrial en- gineering Buck Rogers and son, John, of Berclalr in town on business Billy Bayer admitting to an expensive In- vestment Mrs. Joe Kncera Jr. marking a birthday this week Mn. George Slawsoi requesting that Morning Study Club members return the money for the tickets to the first Shakespeare production as soon possible or by June VICTORIA, TEXAS, SATURDAY, MAY ?0, 1964 Established IMS Veterans Pay Tribute Today Members of six veterans' organization posts will join Saturday in Ihc annual trib- ute to fallen comrades while the city and nation observe Die Memorial Day holiday. Victoria stores, including all but a few service orga- nizations, will close their doors. Victoria Bronte Public Li- brary has announced that it will be closed Saturday, while city and county offices normally are closed on Ihe weekend. Veterans of Posts 166 and 834, American Legion, Posts and 7177 of Vet- erans of Foreign Wars, Post ol Catholic W a r Veterans and Barracks 1767 of Veterans of World War I will assemble at 8 a.m. at the VFW Hall, 103 S. Class St. and will leave at a.m. for Evergreen Ceme- tery. The contingent will tfce> march to another section of Kvcrgree Cemetery for ad- ditional rites before moving on fo Jewish Cemetery and memorial Park Cemetery, where the main program will be held about a.m. During the afternoon con- tingents of veterans will hold memorial services at Nursery, Hlr- schaesuer and Farrar ceme- teries at 3 p.m., UlcFaddla Cemetery at p.m. Mem- ory Gardens, Inez Catholic and Wood Hi cemeteries at p.m., Mission Valley, ForiHran, Bischoff and Shil- Icrvllle cemeteries at 4 p.m., and Mission Valley Catholic Ccmiilery at p.m. Flag raising ceremonies at lire county courthouse and DcLeon Plaza arc sched- uled at a.m. WHM President Back At Schoolhouse Song Group 'Stood Up' At Pavilion Advocate News Service NEW YORK, N. Y. _ T h e Victoria College Corraliers were stood up on the steps oft h e World's Fair Texas Pavilion Friday morning. Someone forgot lo bring the key to unlock the closet where the microphone was stored. Therefore, there was no second performance by the I o u r i n g singers at the mammoth fair. Instead, fair officials present- ed the 15 students and three sponsors tickets to choice seats tor the Texas Pavilion's Music Hall stage production. All decked out in Iheir west- ern attire, the group continued touring tlie fairgrounds Friday before leaving for their accom- modations. They received a lot of "howdy pardncr" greetings, and a lot of fair goers asked them to pose for pictures. Frank Deavcr, one of the sponsors on the lour, said there was another advantage to the western wear because "it's real- ly easy lo spot each other in these big while hats. "Our clothes drew a lot of at- tention to the state and created a lol of questions." One of the local cars ran into a little difficulty with New York traffic. On the way to Ihc fair, it moved in Ihe wrong freeway lane and had lo keep going. II arrived at the fairgrounds two hours later Uian expected. The Corraliers did give a per- formance Friday evening at the First Congregational Church in Bay Shore, Long Island, New York, their hosts while visiting the fair. About 80 persons attended the performance, which Deaver called one of Ihc hesl presented on the tour. They will have a big day Sat- urday. First, there is a 40-mile trip to Manhattan, where they >lan to tour the United Nations, Empire State Building and oLh ilaces of inlcrest. Then they las hecn renamed the Lyndon B. Johnson High School. Thinking ol his own example, Johnson said the history of the past 40 years proves that John- son City, a town ol 600 In the Texas hill country, "Is very much a part of the world." "Above all, we now know that you young people who walk out of here after this ceremony will help belter or world your children will one day he said. Declaring that "something new and better" awaits Ameri- cans of the future, Johnson said "this remains the land of the real experiment, for the Amer- work this year Mrs. Charles er P1aces of interest. Then they Copley getting ready for a trip drive 92 miles to Plymouth Meeting, Penn., just outside Philadelphia. Pier Barbecue Planned Today Advocate PORT O'CONNOR Serving of barbecue will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday as the Port O'- Connor Chamber of Commerce plays host at benefit outing right wron staged to raise funds for devel- opmenl of a public beach ant fishing pier. ginning. The President new to his LBJ Ranch, 15 miles east of here, early Friday. During the day Johnson was briefed on the latest inlelligence from Laos and South Viet Nam, and he also went over a num- ber of reports. George Reedy, White House wess secretary, told reporters Ihat Southeast Asia was one of "many matters of mutual inter- est" that Johnson and Prime Canada discussed at a half-horn meeting in New York on Fri- day night. The meeting re- mained a secret for more than 12 hours. Johnson mel with Pearson In a Now York hotel suite before visiting three Democratic fund- raising affairs. Later, (he Presi- dent conferred with Adlal E. Stevenson, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. Johnson plans to spend much of the holiday weekend in Texas relaxing and visiting wllh old friends. However, another corn- Texas campus in Austin. All the kinfolk and neighbors from Ihe surrounding country (See PRESIDENT, Page 3) Storm Rips Dallas, Fort Worth Alerts Cover Much of State By THE ASSOCIATED WIESS A heavy thunderstorm, mov- ng with high, gusty windi and some big hall, raked the Dallas- ''ort Worth area for hours late Friday and then plunged south- eastward into the heart of Tex- as. The same sort of angry weather struck also al Wichita ?alls and Shcppard Air Force Base. Nearly four inches of rain mas reported in the Wichita Falls vicinity. The big sl'orm which hit Dal- as and Fort Worth apparently 'pruned in Jack and Wise coun- :ies before moving southeast- ward. It plunged the huge In- dus fry-populalion complex into almost nighttime darkness as it dumped its rain and hall. Tornado Alert The slorms struck in Norlh Texas while a, great part of lorthwestern New Mexico, Texas and Northwest Texas were under tornado alert. Max- well, N.M., was smshed by a that killed an elderly man and injured at least 20 oth- er persons. The funnel clouds were re- wrted about nine miles south- ast of-Snyder, Tex., near the Dunn community, but no dam- ago was reported. The heavy thunderstorm itruck'Fort Worth with its dark, awesome' clouds about 3 p.m., hen moved east and south to Dallas. Curb To Curb Several underpasses were looded on the fringes of Fort Worth and water ran curb-to- curb in some Dallas streets. 'Benbrook, in Tarrant County, reported some hail damage. Heav-y hail also fell at Venus and Bridgeport, the latter com- munity, getting 3.34 inches of rain plus three-quarter-inch hall in an hour. A roof of a downtown building at Mesquile, east of Dallas, Sieau experiment, lor me Amer- yi jean slory in the history of life caved in from of wa- bn this planet is really just be- te'r collected during the storm oinnl'nif there. Late In the night, numerous raked a wide area east of a line from 30 miles south of Palestine In East Tex- as to Dallas and to 40 miles northeast of Wichila Falls, Rainfall Reports Official weather bureau re- ports gave these rainfall amounts for the 24-hour period ending at 6 p.m.: Abilene .07, Amarillo .03, Aus- Minister Lester B. Pearson of tin .02, Beaumont .22, Childress .60, Dalharl .34, Dallas 1.07, Fort Worth .76, Mineral Wells .14, and Wichita Falls 3.33. day ranged from 103 al Presidio in the Big Bend Coun- Iry to only 59 at Amarillo In the Panhandle. Shortly before 9 p.m., a tor- nado forecast was issued for the southern portion of the country cast of the Pecos River, most of the Del Rio-Eagle Pass area and the central portions of South Central Texas. The area was under severe thunderstorm menccment speech is on tap for and tornado forecast until 2 Saturday, at the University of a.m. Saturday. At the same time, the weath- er bureau extended until 11 p.m. a tornado forecast for portions (See RAIN, Page 3) 12 Cents Nikita Says Spies In Sky Cover U.S. ALL FOB BAKER Former Stale Sen. Bob Baiter, second from right, is pictured above with Victoria cam- paign supporters during a reception CHARGES SNUBS in his honor Friday. From left are Richard Grant, Morris Kamin, Baker and Herbert Wischkaemper. (Advo- cate Photo) Baker Attacks Pool's Record Robert Baker, making his fourth visit lo Victoria in be- half of his candidacy for Ihe nomination as congressman-at- large, told local supporters Fri- Hght (o moderate thunderstorms day that his opponent has n i-.ir.vi record of snubbing and oppos- ing the Democralic ndminfslrn- balcd in congress, the incum bent manufactures excuses for slaying in Texas for campaign purposes." in addition, Baker said the Congressional Record shows Pool "as either, paired against or not voting on such meas- of. Baker, a former stale sena- tor from Houston, spoke at a reception in his honor at Vic- loria House Restaurant. "When President Kennedy made his fatal trip lo Texas, Joe Pool snubbed Ihc invllation lo accompany Bnker said. "He said he was loo busy, al- though as a matter of fact con- Maximum temperatures 'for gross was engaged In only rou- tine business at that time. tion he is supposed to be a part urcs as the Atomic Energy Ap- prop rial Ion Bill, agricul- tural measures lo help Texas farmers, and other niallers In Ihe interest of his constituents." "Even Texas Republicans are praising the vigorous statesman- ship of the first Texan In the (up White House, and here we have the spectacle of old Joo Pool asking Democrats lo rcnomi- nalc him so he can carry on his fight ngninsl Lyndon B, Baker said. Bnker faces Pool in the Dcm- Trial Set For June In Slaying Tlie murder case of Lloyc Harold Moody, bar tender, Friday was set for June 22 after Moody entered a no guilty plea before Judge Joe B. Kelly In 2-lth District Court Moody is accused of fnlnlly shooting Lloyd Davis Norman 27, also a bartender, oulsldi n tavern In the COO block o East Second Street last Nov 29. Police snlcl the incidcti stemmed from an argumou over o loan. In other action In Kelly', court, James Aden Uichnrdson and Roy Monroe Speck wore assessed 12 years each in the slole penitentiary after plead "Now, when there arc issues ocratic Primary run-off election of national importance being de-Ion June 5. Boy Bitten Three Times On Legs by Rattlesnake Advocate tfcwi Service PORT LAVACA David Ka- bcla, 4, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Kabela of Six Mile, was hospitalized Friday morning af- ter being bitten three times by Kennedy's Words, Beliefs Cited in Birthday Talks HYANNIS PORT, Mass. (AP) The lale President John F. Kennedy believed, "One man make a difference and that Brandt, British former Pimo v man irv every man should try." That capsule oJ his philosophy was broadcast Friday by his young widow Jacqueline to an International television audience from the Cape Cod he loved so well. This would have been the as- sassinated president's 47th birth- day and In recognition of [he oc- casion, an International tribute to him was carried throughout the nation, and to and from Eu- rope via Telstar. Mrs. Kennedy sat to the living room of her father-in-law's sum- mer home and softly spoke of recollection of the late presl dent's beliefs. "One's aim should not be lo live the most comfortable life was her husband's be- lief, she said. "He believed one Of the planned it wrongs." Kennedy J y Me- morial Library in Boston near Harvard University, Mrs. Ken- Tickets for the barbecue will nedy said, "We want UiU library be for adults and 75 cents lo be so much more than just for children under 12 years ofja memorial to help keep alive age, with all proceeds to go to-'the things he believed fc and ward cost of building a fishing stood for" pier, cabana.1! and picnic tables. Airplane and boat rides will carnival for smaller children. Also on the program from Hy- annis Port was Ally. Gen. Rob- be available, as well as a kiddie ert F. Kennedy, t brother ol the lale president. from West Berlin Mayor Willy The European part o< the Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D- broadcast comments Mass., was visiting fn Ireland and joined Lemass on the pro- gram from the Irish Parliament building. The program included film clips ot the president's speech in West Berlin when he won an Minister Harold Macmillan from London, and Irish Prime Min- ister Scan Lemass from Dublin. The other Kennedy brother, THE WEATHER Partly cloudy and warm through Sunday with widely scattered afternoon and evening showers and thundershowers. South to southeasterly winds 10 to 20 m.p.h. Expected Satur- day temperatures: high, low, 74. South Central Texas: Partly cloudy and warm Saturday through Sunday with widely scattered afternoon and evening showers and thundershowers mainly north portion. Htoh Sat- urday SMS. Friday temperatures: high, low, 74, Tides (Port Lavaea-Port O'Connor High at a.m. Saturday- and a low at a.m. Sunday. .Barometric preuure al sea level: Sunset Saturday, sunrise Sunday. Thli Inrormitlon bind on I r o m U.8, WwUwr B VleUrb ovation his declaration in German "Ich bin cin Berliner' "I am a Berliner." Mayor Brandt, brought info the program by Tolstar, said Kennedy's use of the phrase had a great Impact, not only upon the West Berllners. "The presi- dent's words went beyond Ber- In, they were heard in East Berlin and East Germany" and elsewhere, he said. For the Irish segment of Ihe program, Mrs. Kennedy said tho president's trip there last year "wasn't just a sentimental jour- ney, it meant much more than that to him." "The Irish people had faced famine and she said, "but they dreamed and wrote and sang In the face of their burden." Prime Minister said Ihe president "understood very well what his visit meant to Ire- land he was not just the first American president to visit Ireland while in office, but that he came a descendant of emf- (See TALKS, Page 3) r ple ng guilty to burglary and thcf charges stemming from an April 8, I9G3, break-in al Eas- ley's Central Drug Slorc, 17M N. Laurcnl St. Cash, narcotics and a shotgun were taken iron' the store. The same two defendants were handed four-year prison sentences ofler entering guillj picas to companion charges o nttemnl to commit burglary li connection with an nttcmplcc brenk-fn al Ferguson's Town anil Country Drug Store, 130 Airline Drive, also on Apri a rattlesnake while playing in (lie yard. The hospital reporled Ihc child In satisfactory condition, bul that his loft leg Is swollen. His father said the snoke struck his son twice in Ihe left leg and once in the right leg. All bites were about the child's calves. Mrs. Kabela, who was standing about 10 feel from the Incident, said the snake appeared to chase the youngster after first biting him. Kabela's brother Edwin, went back to Ihe area and found a foot snake, which is thought lo be the one thai struck Ihc child. However, a five-foot snake was also found within a short distance of the first one. The family physician had asked them lo attcmpl to locale snake, kill it, and see if it had eaten within about eight hours to determine the ex-lent of venom tho reptile might hava been carrying. It was de: tcrmined that each had eatcri a 1003. The sentences will run concurrently. Receiving a soycn-ycar prison term was Oscar Hail, o: 1105 S. Navarro St. who TRIAL, Page 3) Bulk Both JFK, DALLAS, Tex. (AP) Television station KRLD said Friday It has learned Iho Warren Commission's report on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy will say Ihat the first bullet hit both the president and Texas Gov. John R. Connally, and that the Ihird shot went wild. !n a copyright story, said this information came from a highly placed source to the Warren Commission following last Sunday's rc-tnaclmcnt of the assassination. Previous thinking had been that the lirst bullet hit the president, the second hit the governor, and Ihc- third fatally wounded Kennedy. KRLD said It also had learned the commission's report, which it said was to be released In o few weeks, will show the Today's Iff a of spring when city folks make gardens out of SUNDAY Beef imports, a controversial subject today, will be reviewed tn a comprehensive report in Sunday's Victoria Advocate by Staff Writer Henry Wolff Jr. Many of the factors related to the complex situation will be covered as they pertain to the Victoria area and the nation. Featured In the Fun Magazine section Is the slory of a dream come the Becky Lack Child Day Care Center. Staff Writer Bruce Fatten tells the whole story by words and Ex-Senator Discloses Heel Claim Cuba Proposal Linked Up PARIS (AP) Soviet Premier was quoted Friday is saying Soviet spies-in-lhc- kics were taking pictures of nililnry and sug- csting that Iho United States ely on its own camera-satellites or surveillance of Communist Cuba. "Neither President Johnson nor 1 want another crisis over former Sen. William Be on of Connecticut said Khru- shchev told him In a Moscow nlcrvlow Thursday. "It is Uio 'me for sober sense lo reign." The United States has had a successful global surveillance by o system sluco 1033, hut ihrushchev had never acknowl- edged that Iho Kremlin has an- other one going In outer space. Cuba Relations The discussion, Benlon told newsmen, aroso when lie nuts- loncd Khrushchev about U.S.- Cuban relations. Whether or not Khrushchev mean the Russians had pictures of U.S. bases was not spelled out, but reporters who talked with licnlon thought lhal was he meaning. Bctiton, 64, Is a publisher and lovcrnmcnt official current- .y Iho U.S. envoy to the U.N. Educalional, Sclcnlific and Cul- lural Organization, which has headquarters in Paris. Ho was a Democratic sennlor from Con- necticut 10J9-1953. He vlslled the Soviet Union for 10 days as a guest of tho Institute of So- vicl-Americnn Relallons. Offers To Show Bcnton said Khrushchev told him: "If you wish, I can show you photos of military installa- tions Inken from ouler space. I will show them lo President Johnson if he wishes." Khrushchev did not make en- tirely clear whether he referred to photographs taken by Soviet spacemen on orbital flights or ihotos from wide- ly discussed spy-in-the-sky sys- lem Ihat the Russians havo said the United Stales is using. Discussion of tho space pho- tographs came up while they talked about Ihe reconnaissance flights tho United States hss maintained over Cuba since the Soviet missile crisis of 1002 to guard against another secret buildup of offensive missiles. Time For Sense. Benlon said Khrushchev sug- gested the United States aban- don these flights, saying: "Nei- ther President Johnson nor I mant anolhcr crisis over Cuba. (See NIKITA, Page 3) The first bullet entered the president's body slightly above the right collar bone and exiled, lust to the left of the tic knot, then entered the body of Connal- ly just above the fifth rib. The second bullet struck the president in the back of the head. The third bullet followed a much firmer trajectory than the first two, because the motor- cade was moving down a slop- ing street, and it struck a man- hole cover, then ricocheted olf the curb and never was found. Medical opinion in the com- mission's report will show that chances for Ihc president's re- covery from the lirst wound would have been exccllnt. Also, had tho first hit been a fraction lower, tho force of the bullet probably would have knocked ihe president lo Ihe floor of the car and removed him from Ihe line of sight for the second fatal shot. The first bullet traveled 168 feet before it hit, the second 207 feet. There was nn interval of 4'A thfrd shots, and experls contend a crack marksman could hava fired all three In the time It took the assassin (o (ire the first I wo.   

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