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Advocate Newspaper Archive: May 27, 1964 - Page 1

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - May 27, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 20 TELEPHONE HI S-1U1 VICTORIA, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 1964 2 Oklahoma Incumbents Defeated Redistricting Plan Approved OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla (AP) pair of Oklahoma incum- bents, U.S. Sen. J. Howard Ed- mondson and 6th District Rep. Victor Wlckersham went down lo stunning defeats in Demo- cratic runoff elections Tuesday night. Youthful State Senator Fred Harris, who campaigned as a "new scored a landslide victory over Edmondson who got the Senate job in January 1963 after the death of Robert S. Kerr. Harris' next big battle is in the general election campaign when he goes against glamour candidate Bud Wilkinson, form- er football coach turned Repub- lican politician. Veteran Defeated Wickersham's defeat was an even greater surprise. The 18- year congressional veteran was edged out by Jed Johnson Jr., 24-year-old son of the late Okla- homa congressman. Johnson just barely succeeded in win- ning a runoff spot against Wick- ersham after the May 5 primary election. Unofficial returns from 2947 of the state's precincts in the senate race gave Harris Edmondson fn the congressional race, with all of the district's 607 precincts reporting, Johnson got Wickersham Keapportionrnent Voters also overwhelmingly approved a legislative reappor- tionment plan which rural resi- dents termed a "life or death" struggle against federal court reapportioning powers. The proposed amendment would base representation in a 48-membcr Senate mainly on area, with some consideration given la population. Representa- tion in a 128-member House would be determined by a popu- lation ratio system, with each of the state's 77 counties guar- anteed at least one representa- tive. Florida Rejects Pledged Slate MIAMI, Fla. (AP) Florida Republicans rejected Tuesday night a slate of delegates pledged to Sen. Barry Goldwa- ter, and Democrats nominated a candidate for governor sworn to battle against civil rights. Haydon Burns, 52-year-old mayor of Jacksonville and a tough-talking foe of the civil rights bill, won the Democratic nomination for governor and al- most certain election in Novem- ber, when he meets Republican Charles Holiey, a state legislal- ABILENE, Tex. (API -Beet prices in Abilene supermarkets revived somewhat Tuesday from weekend lows that gave housewives such bargains as sirloin steak for 49 cenls a pound and short ribs for only eight cents a pound. But file competitive squeeze may force prices down to near rock bottom again by the week- end. Roy Furr of Lubbock, presi- dent of Furr's, Inc.. a leading food chain in the Southwest, said he situation in Abilene had no relation to the market. "Prices just got out of hand n Furr said, "ll's lurely a competitive thing, as 'ar as I can see." The Abilene beef price war ast weekend brought steak that lad sold for 1.19 a pound down :o 49 cents. Another example was chuck roast, down from 59 :o 29 cents, Veterans To Hold Memorial Rites A full program has been planned for the Memorial Organizations comprising the council are Posts Ibb and 834, Legion; Posts 4146 and 7477 Veterans of Foreign Wars; Catholic War Veterans Post and World War I Veterans Space Sliol Delayed CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. (AP) wilh a compressor which pumps cooling liquid ni- trogen lo the guidance system has forced a two-day postpone- ment, until Thursday, of the first attempt lo orbit an un- manned model of the Apollo moonship. WENT RIBS Beef War Rips Abilene Market Short ribs apparently took the most severe beating with prices from 37 to eight cenls a pound. Butchers complained that the war was causing overall deficits in meat markets, even though pork and poultry prices remain- ed stable. A representative concensus indicated that the bottom fell out of the beef price market be- cause of intense competition among large chain supermar- kets for the weekend shopper. The Abilene Reporter News said one meat market sold 000 pounds of beef last week to housewives. "They must be feeding their families beef three times a day and for midnight snacks, one butcher said. Furr said the beef price war was like a gasoline war. "It could break out anywhere, at he said. Arms Lid Taken Off In Viet Nam Forces Given 'Blank Check' WASHINGTON (AF) The Jnited Slates has given its mil- lary forces in Viet Nam a top priority blank check on arms, manpower and funds of the Pentagon to help the South Viet- namese fight and defeat invad- ing Communist guerrillas. Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, slating this Tues- day, said reports that obsolete >lanes and equipment had wised casualties In -South Viet s'am were "absolutely without Day observance Saturday Council. by The Victoria Veterans Washington Area Toured By Corraliers Barracks 1767. ..ivocalc News ScrvJce WASHINGTON. D. C. Victoria College Corraliers toured Mount Vernon Tuesday and visited Arlington Cemetery, where they went to Ihe grave of President Kcnnedd and watched a changing of Ihe guard at the tomb of Hie Unknown Soldier. U.S. Hep. Clark W. Thompson will provide a breakfast for the touring singers Wednesday morning. They will then tour the Senate and House galleries and visit the White House be- fore driving 260 miles to Bay Shore, Long Island, N. V. The 15 students and three ad- ults also viewed the Pentagon, The main program will begin at approximately a.m. at Memorial Park Cemetery, but other phases of the program arc to be held throughout the day. Flag raising ceremonies will be held at a.m. at the courlhouse, DeLeon Plaza, and various post headquarters. Af- ter the flags have been raised, they will be lowered lo half masl in memory of war dead of all wars. Assembly at 8 a.m. Veterans are lo assemble at 8 a.m. at PWHall, 103 S Lincoln Memorial House Tuesday. and White We were tremendously im- pressed with Ihe beauty of the Virginia said Frank D e a v c r, college jour- nalism instructor who is han- dling publicity on the 15-day tour that will include perform- ances at the Texas Pavilion at the World's Fair later this week. Deaver said the choral group enjoyed a Chinese supper Tues- day even though chop sticks proved too much for some of the Texans lo handle. Forks were provided those who chick ened out. Church. The veterans Charge Filed In Car Crash A charge of negligent homi- cide while in performance of a lawful act has been lodged In County Court in Edna against Adolph Kolacny of Ganado fol- lowing investigation of a May 14 traffic accident that claimed the life of Betty Koncaba, 16, of Edna. Kolacny, who suffered a com pound fracture of his left leg and multiple facial cuts, re- mained in De Tar Hospital Tues- day. The accident occurred when a car driven by Kolacny and also president, respectively, of the occupied by Miss Koncaba slammed head-on against a rail- ing on the Jackson County side of the Arenosa Creek bridge Tuesday night at CPL auditori- seven miles cast of Inez. The urn. C. HI. Ferguson finding him- self in a good natural cracker controversy Joe Mirando welcoming grandson Edilie le Jr. back from Florida Mrs. SI. D. Sloncr scheduled to undergo surgery Thursday at John Sealy Hospital in Hous- ton Mrs. W. D. Coleman Sr. offering good sense and humor as heller trails than wor- rying about something one can do nothing about Mrs. Clif- ton Afflcrback doing her best to assist o friend in need Charles Rfppamonti offering a real surprise to an old custom- er "Ike" (E. J.) Gerdes offering suggestions only, to a friend carrying two garbage cans at a time The Buddj Mlesenhelders taking grand- daughter Sandra Cay on a fish- ing trip Mr. and Mrs. Wil- liam M. Pratka on tour of Carls- bad Caverns Vincent Ruiz offering his comments on t h e world scene Mrs. E. V. Bond and Mrs. W. H. Can- will be on hand at McNamara-O'Con- nor Museum from 10 a.m. lo 12 noon today and the Amy Free- Carl Nixon, auto plummeted into the creek embank menl but did not over- turn. Kolancny was pinned in side until he was freed by high way patrolmen using a special rescue kit. Patrolmen Ralph McClendon and Everette Hewitt of made the Invest ig a I Ion. Edna Shrimper Found Guilly of Murder BROWNSVILLE, Tex. murder on the high stas, de- sade held in Victoria during spile his contention he killed one man and wounded another man Lee Art Exhibit will be on display during these hours also the Rev. Frank Broesicke pastor emeritus of Martin Lu- ther Church al Coleltovllle, cele- brating his 72nd birthday yes- terday Ben Rilterskamp hospitalized for a couple of days Freeport, who was captain of J." Bartosh, Van Way w Hi spending hla first night in........... (he OB ward creating some con: fusion among the nurses, who first tried lo admit Mrt. RlUcr- in self-defense. Nixon was found guilty slaying Boyce Lee Weber the shrimp boat Miss Lisa Wsber was shot to death aboard the shrimper last Jan. 24 while alternate. It was anchored In Campeche Bay oil the cout of Mexico. will march lo Jewish Cemetery for a prayer by Reader Dave Lack, and from there will proceed lo Catholic Cemetery No. 2, at the soutl side gate, for a prayer by Hie Rev. Vincent Patrizi, assistan pastor of Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church. Main Program From there, the assemblage will proceed to Memorial Park Cemetery for the main program Capt. William E. Schneider, commanding officer of the loca Salvation Army Unit, will opei: this program wilh a prayer Decorations will be placed on the graves in the VFW section by representatives of posts. A roll call will be held by W. H McManis, post adjutant, fol- lowed by a prayer led by the (See KITES, Page 6) Former City Calls Dies After Short Illness 1 o Briefing oundation. He made his comments lo Former City Councilman Thomas 0. Miracle died In a local hospital Tuesday at a.m. afler an Illness of three days. He was 65 years old last Nov. S. Funeral services for the vet- eran public official and civic eader will be held at 3 p.m. Wednesday from First English jutheran Church wilh Ihe Rev larold A. Pearson officiallng. The body will lie in state at the church from 2 p.m. until time or Ihe service. Burial under direction of Mc- labe Carruth Funeral Home 411 be in Evergreen Cemetery I wilh City Manager John Lee, ormer Mayor W. R. McCright, Louis L. Keclik, W. R. Coons, L. Hax and Allene Lassman lewsmen after briefing the Sen- ate Armed Services Committee or nearly three hours on his most recent trip to Viet Nam vhen he was accompanied by Gen. Maxwell D. Taylor, chair- nan of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Denies Reports Another defense official, Sec- etary of the Air Force Eugene Zuckert, also stoutly defend- ed the record of U. S. planes In Viet Nam against reports thai struclural failures had caused the deaths of two U. S. fliers. Zuekert, testifying before the louse Armed Services Commlt- ec, listed one plane crash in Viet Nam as definitely caused by structural failure and three ithers as possibly caused, by il. Good Records But he slated emphatically: "So far as accident sfalblics are concerned, both the B26 and the T28 in South Viet Nam have letter records than modern jet Southern Pacific Railroad In s pallbearers. Victoria City Hall will close at 2 p.m. Wednesday, honoring he memory of the former city councilman, and remain closed or Ihe rest of the day. Born Nov. 5, 1898, at Eddy, near Waco, Mr. Miracle came to Victoria to 1919 to begin bis railroading career. He joined Sfiltlhflrw Paftfin f_ 'IghUsrs here in the United States." Meanwhile, correspondent Jfm 3. Lucas, in a displach from Viet Nam to the Scripps-How- ard Newspapers, said he had ;one on more than 20 operations against the Communist Viet Cong and added: "t have yet to jarticipate in one in which the Vietnamese supported us from he air. We have always called on the Americans and their an- tiquated trainer, the T28." No Native Support Lucas wrote that the Vietna- mese would not risk flights over 1922 as a brakeman and was en- Jineman foreman here when he Ex-Principal OVER 'NEW RULES ._ i TT iitillj JLU ij. YtUUlU JIUl IKtft UWl Glass and will leave at dangerous territory, would not a.m. in aulos for Cemetery. The ceremony there will''begin at approximately" 9 a.m. A memorial prayer will be giv- en by tho Rev. Z. Broadtis, pas- lor of Palestine Baptist Church. The group will then proceed lo another section of Evergreen Cemetery, for a prayer by the Rev. W. F. Halhaway Jr., pas- tor of St. Marks Methodist Of Catholic School Dies Sister M. Genevieve La fan, a native of Wexford, -Ireland, who lad been a teacher for 65 years In Cuero and Victoria, d.ied Monday at p.m. In a Cuo- ro hospital after an Illness of principa Cuero. She was 83 years of age fly at night or on Sundays, would not go below feet when dropping napalm. The dispatch continued: "Giv- ing the Vietnamese more planes sounds good. But il is another example of how different this war looks in Washington and In the delta. II will remain the same aid war fought with the same old-fashioned lools." McNamara's report to the Armed Services Committee was In closed session. Chairman R] ard B. Russell, D-Ga., said aft- erward the secretary's testimo- ny indicated the military situa- tion in Viet Nam is "very seri- us." Sen. Lcverelt Sallonslall of Massachusells, the ranking Re publican member, said McNa- mara was very frank in prescnl- ing bolh the pros and cons o: the Communist push in South- east Asia. And both Saltonstall and Rus- of Kimberly, South Africa, sell said McNamara appeared confldenl Ihe South Vietnamese could carry their fight to a sue cessful conclusion. ro nospitai alter an Illness of Mien. (AP) They claimed the two days. She was a former Placard-carrying women halt- was a substitute i principal of SI. Michael's hi "d four trains here Tuesday their husbands who rTllATYi And rpslstwl attortt rift? In Viir riniivt Today's Chuckle Warning: Never put off until tomorrow what you can rio today; there may be a law against It by that time.. Local Cancer Society Elects Slate of Officers Mr. and Mrs. Carl Van Way were elected president and vice Victoria County Unit of the American Cancer Society al the annual meeting of the unit Mrs. Van Way was re-elected vice president. Van Way suc- ceeds Mrs. Robert P. Barry for the top post. Other new officers are Mrs. L. 0. Sturdevant, and Mrs. D. F. Peyton, who were reelected secretary and speclively. treasurer, re- Five delegates were elected to the district meeting of Ihe so- ciety. They were Mr. and Mrs. Van Way, Mrs. Peyton, Mrs. Sturdevant, and Mrs. Harry A federal court jury found Joe Madden, who served as chair- Carl Nixon, 35, of Porl Aransas, man of the house-to-house cam- guilty Tuesday of second degree paign during the Cancer Cru April. Alternates named were Mrs. John Dorrls, Dr. B, F, BoJton, Dr. James E. Bauer, Mrs. Ar- thur J. Witte and Mrs. Allen named as delegate to the state meeting, with Mrs. Van Way as Named as new medical mem- bers of the board of directors were Dr. Larry Rfedel, and Dr Lloyd C. Jones. New lay mem hers elected lo the board were Robert J. Seerden, Bruce Pal' ton, Mrs. Arthur J. Wilte, Mrs. Maddin and Mrs, Oscar Phil- lips. A financial report preparet by B. E. Albrechl, campaign chairman, Indicated that has been contributed to the lo- cal unit during the past year, compared with last year. Albrecht's report indicated however, that this year's house- to-house campaign In which 27151 was raised, was the mosi that had ever been contributed through the program. Miscellaneous gifts, including donations from local and area plants and their employes, to- taled ?792 this year, and J1.051 in 1963. Mrs. John Sliies, public tAa- cation chairman, reported that public school officials have co- operated wholeheartedly In the showing of a film, "To Smoke or Not To Smoke." The film warns students that they are apt to invite lung cancer U they begin smoking. Mrs. Sllles noted that the film had been shown to three PTA groups, with a physician on hand (St. WFtCEBC, Page I) 18 Cents Soviet Raps Goldwater On Viet Nam War Plan 1953. Re-elected in 1057, he f served until 1661 when he was defeated for re-election by J. E. Weatherly Jr. Between terms Mr, Miracle had served on the original Vlc- loria Planning Commission, and he was lo scn-c briefly Asia Decision Seen Imminent UNITED NATIONS, N.Y Soviet Delegate Nikolai again on this board after his Fedorenko Tuesday accused defeat in 1961. He entered city Sen. Barry Goldwater of urgine IMlilics again in 1963 to seek the post of mayor being vacated by Joe E. Kelly, but lost in a runoff election to Mayor Kcm- oer Williams Jr., Ho was cur- rcntly serving on tlio board of equalizatlon. n o- Through years Mr. Mira- Icy Is made by the executive the United States to adopt a "cannibalistic policy" of atomic warfare In South Viet Nam He suggested Goldwaler be placed tn a straitjacket. U.S. Ambassador Adlal Ste- enson replied that foreign pol cle held every office in the n Brotherhood of Firsl English and not by Goldwaier "or any Lutheran Church, and was a deacon, elder and vice-president of the congregation, as well as assistant Sunday School super- n senaors o e Infendcnt. At the lime of his White Houso late Tuesday for a death he was serving on the briefing on the mounting crisis stewardship committee, was de- touched off by Communist partmenlal Sunday School su- drives In Southeast Asia. pcrlnlendent and was a mem her of Ihe evangelism comro.ll- A While House statement said "current sllualions in South lee. T. O. MIRACLE retired last Nov. 29 afler 41 years of service to the line. nllracle s mfmaer He was first elected to Vic- of the Brotherhood of Railroad toria City Council in 1949 and Trainmen and the SP Service served two terms, retiring In (See MIRACLE, Page 6) Mr Miracle was a member nd resisted police attempts tp up demonstrations of pro- Mother House Mortuary Chapel followed by Requiem High womcd wcre arrested in Mass at the Incarnate Word Grandville on charges Convent Chapel. The Rev. Ar- of obstructing police. mand Weber will conduct serv- Most demonstrators refused ices and interment will be in to give their names on grounds Catholic Cemetery No. 3 under lh-' direction of McCabe- Carmlh Funeral Home. Pallbearers will be Ed Pargac, Joe Barton, Den- nis Scherer, Fred Sommere, Charles Kulchka Harrison Sr. and A. W. Sister M. Genevieve was born cost their husbands' jobs. The women marched In a tight circle on the tracks while railway officials edged the train closer and closer. Officers tried lo move Ihe women off by clasping hands auier in. uenevieve was oom nuuua Jan. 24, 1881, the daughter of anti forming a line. Three Michael and Anne Shannon Lai- pickets squirmed (an of Wcxford. She Is sur- vived by two sisters, Sister We- reberge of Warwickshire, Eng- land, and Sisler M. Gerlrude free. With arrival of reinforce menls, police cleared them Rice, 36, of Wyoming, and Mrs. Rollln Ur Murder Charge Filed at Ciiero Advocate Cuero DureRU CUERO-Ramond Garcia, 22, charged with murder in the dcalh of Adolpb Liendo, 34, is due to appear before the DeWill County grand jury next week. The jury meets Monday lo open the summer-fall term of 24lh Distrlcl Court. The complaint charging mur rler was signed Tuesday by Po- lice Chief Charles Clark. Gar- cia, fn ______ :rom the city to Garcia threw the hit Ltcndo ne accompanied ny me ban, 32, of Cedar Springs plead-voter's poll tax or exemption ed guilty before Grandville certificate. AI Pcrsons to appcar a Justice of the Peace Henry Al kema on the obstructing charge. Alkema suspended ?1C fines against them. One group of pickets at h hefac in the 400 block ig an aig of W. Ma m1 last (hat night In a San Antonio hos- pital. THE Partly doudy with a few widely scattered daytime thundershowers Wednesday and Thursday. South la enrich to partly cloudy Wednesday and Thursday with widely scattered mostly afternoon and evening thundershowers. High Wednes- day 84-94. Temperatures Tuesday: Low 70, high 80. Tides (Port Lavaca-Port O'Connor High at a.m. Low at p.m. Barometric pressure at s e a evel: Sunset Wednesday: Sunrise Thursday: Infornulton baMd on ctau 'torn the, U.S. Railroad Wives Picket 4 Trains GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) They claimed their protest action (or vented by court Injunction from (See WIVES, Page 6) Fiet Nam, Cambodia and Laos" vere covered. No further details were dts- losed, but tho conference was -1 as diplomatic sources were they believe John- son administration Is in Ihe pro- ess of making decisions on policy moves In Soulheast isla, So far the public, emphasis as been on diplomatic, rather than military, actions Earlier Tuesday Johnson met 'ilh Secrelary of State lusk and Secretary of Defense iobert S. McNamara .for uncheon discussion. Laoa and he situation in neighboring Viet yam presumably were major Absentee Vote To Open Absentee voting for the June 6 Democrat and Republican prl mary run-off election will open at 0 a.m. Wednesday in Counly Clerk Val Huvar's office at the county courthouse. Voting will be conducted diir- ng the regular office hours from J a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondy througl Friday until June Z at S p.m Huvar pointed out thai the only methods tor voting will be in person or by mail. If by mail the application must be in an envelope postmarked from r point outside the counly. I. should he accompanied by the Whatever Needed On iho genera! policy of the Jnited Slates in Soulheast Asia Stevenson.said it Is the Intend ion of the United States to do whatever is necessary lo help the nations of Southeast Asia to remain free." The exchange took place In he U.K. Security Council after Mjdorenko Injected the name of wo U.S. candidate for the Re- nibllcan presidential .nomina- tion Into debate on Uio South- east Asia crisis. The question of use of atomic weapons In South Viet Nam came up also during a news Secrctary-Gener- Ollawa Against fnanl said he was the office because they are phys Ically disabled or 111 Including pregnancy, must mall their ap- plication and doctor's aftidavl Chesapeake Ohio crossing and poll tax or exemption lo near the soulheaslern Grand Ihe office. Huvnr added. Th RspHs limits said they were, ballot will then be sent to th engineers, (ire- voter who must return il b mall only. President Declares Dem; Four WASHINGTON (AP) Presl- the war on poverty and clvi dent Johnson invited at a rights legislation specifically. "But we are a party not sat isfied with past Johnso said. "We are fntent on fulur, goals. We are a party confiden that a people who will face th future can master that future en onson nvte at a Slant Party Tuesday night In another fou? years of Democratic leadership so II Ann Ml ci uuiiLuiaaiii; 5O H Uiis country niffflf a flan Anlnnln Although he didn't say so question that he to watch a star-studded show sing songs to the President and rich the party treasury by "hen he departed from his prepared text lo add, "and I hope that you are all going be with me for these years achievement that we yet come." The No. 1 Democrat toW fel- low DemocraU (bat the party has a proud record, a "shining list of acts which have helped make Ms country great and strong and free." He mentioned Social Security, minimum wage, r "J; a rmrlv 'I18' believes th "S again, we say to the -------people: Give us you support and we will finish the the President said. The forum was a "Salute LBJ gala" at the Nations Guard Armory an fo to which the party faithful shelled of out apiece to see a show to and listen to speeches. Ten thousand balloons I, enormous clusters splashed col or through the upper reicnes o the armory. The enterUlnmen world provided talenl. The show was produced by compaser-lyr st Richard Adlcr, with aclo; (Set PRESIDENT, I) ranch of the y th U.S. government ther senator." Meanwhile In Washington resident Johnson summoned y Republican senators lo the Cover situation ,.w agmnsi. use of atomic weapons for de- structive purposes "anywhere, under any and anybody who proposes use of atomic weapons for destructive Hirposes Is, in my view, out of ils mind." Fcdorenko spoke after Ste- venson hnd urged the council to Hie United )g role Nations tension- son- ridden border between South Viel Nam and Cambodia. Ste- venston did so In the face of op- Msilio r from France and Oam- xxlia. Goldwater said on a television program on Sunday that low- e the Soulh Viet Nam borders and expose jungle sunnlv lines of (Ste SOVIET, Page "PRESIDENTIAL ElECTHM HANDBOOKS The Iiiuec Hfpukllttn con- tender! Contend- er! Key Men to Wattk TV and Kadio Shuu votlac VM may pU >f 1U I.   

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