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Advocate Newspaper Archive: May 26, 1964 - Page 1

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Publication: Advocate

Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - May 26, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                VICTORIA, TEXAS, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 1964 ElUblUhcd 24 Cents Union Vote Set June 17 At Cuero Textile Mill DOG BUSINESS Gary Glenn Underwood, 15 months, son of Mr. and Mrs. Gary Underwood of 1808 E. Locust, has plenty of puppies to play with since Pixie, the family pooch, gave birth to a litter of 15 Friday. Thirteen lived, (he same number she gave birth to last year. Gary Glenn also has a new little brother, Joel Scott, born Thursday. (Ad- vocate Photo) Local Woman Jailed On Murder Charge By BRUCE PATTON Advocate Staff Writer Mrs. Belly Lou Jackson, 24, of S. Manlz, was jailed Monday afternoon, accused of killing Mrs. Lorena Thompson, 38, her next door neighbor. "With malice aforethought, by pounding and beating her head against the was the wording of Ihe formal charge against Ihe Negro wom- an filed in the office of Justice of the Peace Alfred C. Baass. Police Lt. Robert H. Winley said Mrs. Jackson had admitled the act in a statement, and that statements had been taken from several witnesses. Bond was set at Mrs Jackson vyas still in jail late Monday night. Airs. Thompson died at a.m.; last Tuesday in a local hospital, less than 12 hours after, having been admitted foi treatment of a head injury. Herman Gadsden, also of 202V4 S. Mantz St. where Mrs. Thompson lived, had told po- lice that the woman became ill May 17 and was walking around in a stupor. He said he found her unconscious the next day. Investigation into the circum- stances surrounding Ihe head injury finally led to Mrs. Jack- son's arrest on the charge of murder. Winley said that the two women had been involved in a fight about 2 a.m. May 10, at the site of file homes. At the lime, he said, there was no report made to police, and no call for medical aid to treat Mrs. Thompson. Mrs. Thompson had not been under a physician's care until she was brought unconscious to the hospital last Tuesday afternoon. Police were called after hos- pital officials could find out few of the circumstances which resulted in the head injury to Mrs. Thompson. After her death, Baass was. called to ren- der a Verdict. Medical opinions indicated, Baass said Monday, night, that Ihe type of head injury suffered by Mrs, Thompson was the type more often suffered in a fall rather than from a blow. Lie Test Given Figures In Beer Bottle Slaying Arfrocjlc, Cuero Bureau CUERO Two Cuero men took lie detector tests in Aus- tin Monday in. connection with the death of Adolph Liendo, 34, Saturday. Police Chief Charles Clarl said the tests were taken by Rarnond Garcia, 22, who is be- ing held for throwing the beer bottle that hit Liendo in the face, and Orlino Licon, 20, a witness. Liendo was hit by the bottle following an argument in the 400 block of W. Main Saturday. He died late that night in a San Anlonip hospital. Clark said he has not re- ceived a report on Ihe autopsy thai was performed in .San An- tonio. He said it would be later Ihis week before he receives reporls on the tests. lie detector Clark, who reported the in- vesligalion has not been com- pleted, said charges will prob- ably be filed Tuesday. Funeral services for Liendo will be conducted at 0 a.m. at Our Lady of Guad alupe Catholic Church. The Rev. Donald Murray will of- ficiate. Burial will be in San Ysidro Cemetery near Arnccke- ville under the direction of Freund Funeral Home. Survivors are the wife; four sons, Adolph Jr., Ruben, Felix and Rudy, and six daughters, Rosa Marie, Palmeria, Caro- lina, Erma, Theresa and Syl- via, all of Cuero; the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Liendo Sr. of Cuero; three brothers, Louis Jr. and Johnny of Cuero and Robert of the U.S. Air Force, Abilene; and three sisters, Miss Myrtle Liendo, Mrs. Caroline Ruiz and Miss Josephine Lien- do, all of Cuero. However, he withheld his ver- dict as police detectives con- tinued their investigation inlo the case. After Mrs. Jackson's arrest Monday, his verdict in- dicated that death was due to injuries sustained in an alter- cation wilh Mrs. Betty Lou Jackson, under circumstances rendering Mrs. Betty Lou Jack- son chargeable with murder." Mrs. Thompson was first iden- tified as Retta Boday, a name which she apparently used as something of a nickname, Baass said, A son notified Baass of her correct name. Winley indicated that Mrs. Jackson had previously been in city jail, but as far as is known, had never been arrested for a felony. Mrs. Jackson was arrested at her home early Monday. She laler talked wilh her husband al Ihe city jail, and gave a slalemcnl to detectives. The murder charge was acceptcc by County Ally. Whayland W Kilgore, and she was Irans ferrcd to the county jail in late afternoon. Corraliers Perform In Virginia AdviK-iEe News Service MARION, Va. The Vic toria College Corraliers, 15 se lect voices from Ihe school's grand choir, performed be Tore an estimated 225 persons in the Marion, Va., High Schoo auditorium Monday evening. The performance was spon sored by the Marion Junior Women's Club and Ihe Smylh County Hospital Auxiliary, whc were co-hosts to a buffet dinnci for the touring singers, as wcl! as overnight accomodafions. Frank Deaver, journalism in structor at Victoria College whr is handling public relations on the 15-day tour, said .the sing- ers have encountered no diffi cullies thus far on their trip but had to make up for an hour (See CHOIR, Page 7) Dual Role Given GOP Keynoter WASHINGTON (AP) _ The iepublican National Conven- ion Arrangements Commillee las named Sen. Thruslon B. Morton of Kentucky as perma- nent chairman and Gov. Mark Jatfield of Oregon as keynote speaker and temporary chair- man of the 1964 convention. The action camo Monday after the commillee voted 28 lo 10 to combine the offices of emporary chairman and key- noter for the first time since the 1948 convention. GOP National Chairman Wil- iam Miller, announcing Ihe re- sults of the closed meeting, said .ho decision to combine the two offices was made in order to cut down on some of the speech- naking at the convention which begins July 13 in San Francisco. Change Opposed Backers of Sen. Barry Gold- water of a candidate for GOP presidential nom- ination, opposed Ihe move to combine the two jobs. And Gold- water supporters offered Gov Tim Babcock' of Montana for the keynoter-lemporary chair- man job. But after the election, F. Clif ton White, co-director of field operations for Goldwatcr, sale he was pleased wilh the selec- tion of Morton and said he ha( always felt Halfield should be on the program. Morton was elected without opposition, Miller said, while Hatfieid defeated Babcock by 28 lo 10. Compromise? Sen. Peter Dominick of Colo- rado, and Minnesota State Chairman Robert A. Forsythe also had been mentioned for the job of keynoter 'but they wore removed from consideration after the vole lo combine Use of (ices. Asked whether the alignmen represented a compromise be- tween conservatives and libcra elements of the party, Miller (See GOP, Page 7) Today's Chuckle Usually the fellows who give their wives plenty of freedom don't give (hem any money. Both Sides To File Complaints Employe's Dismissal Hit By BEN PRAUSE Advocate Cuero Bureau CUERO Labor and man- agement representatives agreed Monday on the dale of June 17 'or an election to decide if employes of Guadelupe Valley :otton Mills wanl Ihe Textile Workers Union of America, AFL-CIO to acl as (heir collec- ive bargaining agent. Only a simple majority needed lo carry the election either way. The date was set during an nformal conference presided over by B. F. Mueller of Ilio National Labor Relations Soard's 23rd regional office in louslon. Shonly afler the conference, had ended, both union and plant representatives told a group of about 65 workers that complaints of unfair labor practices would be filed wilh he regional office. Employe Dismissed The union's complaint will in- volve Ihe dismissal of former colton mill employe Alton tellers, wtio has been serving on Ihe plant employes organiz- ing committee. Fellers claimed that when he ,vont to work Monday morning liis supervisor told him there was no work for him. Fellers, who had been on sick leave said he hod been fold May 21 to report to work May 25. Fclters said' he had been mill employe (or 27 years James A. Blackwell, inter- national representative of the Textile Workers Union of Amer lea, said a complaint involving Feller's dismissal will be filec in Houston Tuesday morning. Challenge Issued A. Frank Kelley, genera manager of Lone Star Textiles Inc., which operates mills ir Cuero, Mexla and Bohham challenged Fellers' right to represent the employes since he is no longer employed by Ihe company. Fellers had beer silling in on Ihe conference as t member of lite organizing com mlllce, but left Ihe room fol lowing a conference with Black well and members of Ihe com mitlee. Kelloy said (he company's complaint will be based on Ihreals and coercion reportedly used to force employees to sign cards authorizing the union to act as (heir collective bargain- ing agent. Monday's meeting was ar- ranged after a number of hourly-paid workers signed these cards. It was not made public exactly how many cards were signed, but Mueller did say that at least 30 per cent of the workers had to be interested in joining a union before action (See VOTE, Page 7) Sgt. Carl Berger home on a 30-cay leave from Frankfurt, Germany, visiting his parents, the Emil Bergers of Route 2 Henry Zeplin of East Juan Linn Street reporting 2.75 inches of rain during the past week which had helped brighten his garden Bobby Matson of Pus Christi. Two funnel clouds and a possible waterspout were reported over marshlands 13 miles southeast of Beaumont. No damage was reported in either area. Maximum readings ranged Port Lavaca in town on busi- ness Mrs. Joyce Arnold having her problems with deep freeze doors left open over night Mrs. Harold Pearson in Citizen's Memorial Hospital with an appendectomy Winifred Kainer looking forward lo El Paso another shower Howard Bierley explaining that two young daughters make for a lively household Cliff Grif- fith taking time for a busy morn- ing to help a friend in need Pete Brown gaining fame for being well informed on the base- ball activties Freddy Moss women drivers Dr. F. J. Kreaelc brushing up on the lalest Ihe Project Apollo moonship. baseball scores Paul Murphy offering his recipe for an enjoyable day sli" about his winning leam, Ihe Pillsburgh Pirates, who played In Houston recently. Walerspout Seen In Corpus Area By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS At least one waterspout and two funnel clouds were sighted along the Texas coast Monday as widely scattered showers fell in the state. One waterspout was seen in the Gulf of Mexico east of Cor- from S3 at Galveston to 97 at Denhoff. HOLLYWOOD, (AP) The Dick Van Dyke Show, nearly dropped in its first season, was the top winner, at the Tele- vision Academy Awards Mon- day, taking five Emmies. Bolh stars, Van Dyke and Mary Tyler Moore, were hon- ored as best performers in a series. The show itself was hailed by the academy vot- ers as the best comedy program. Emmies also went to director Jerry Paris and writers Carl Reiner, Sam Persky and Bill Saturn Launch Of Apollo Slated CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. (AP) The world's most powerful known rocket, a Saturn 1, Is expressing his implicit trust in poised for an attempt Tuesday to orbit an unmanned model of "The firing Is the first of a long series of unmanned flights lo qualify Ihe hardware for missions by Ihree- man Apollo crews and leading ultimately to manned landings on the moon. Van Dyke Show Named As Top Emmy Winner Danny Kaye, a longtime hold- out against steady television work, was another top winner. The flame-haired comedian was chosen as best musical-variety star and his Wednesday night CBS hour was best variety pro- gram. Emmies also went to Kaye's director, Robert Scheer- er, and the show's photography. ceremony went off The smoothly and wfth a full and stellar cast despite official boy' colts by CBS and ABC. Despite hazard voting. the network bans virtually alt performers on the program showed up. Two weeks ago executives of ABC's 5. the two networks blasled the DIC VAN DYKE of illogical categories and hap- CBS, which started the fuss, came out top winner. It won 13 Emmies to NBC's a and Even though il was low net- Television Academy, accusing it work in totals, ABC scored with MARY TYLER MOORE the prestigious program ol the year Emmy for "The Making of the President 19M" a film version of Theodore H. best selling book of the Kennedy Nixon campaign. The same show won for best (See EMMY, Page 7) T i _______________ __________________________________________________________ ______ ____________________________ Greater State Seen in Funds AUSTIN (AP) The proposals, he said, committee will he of the Legislative Budget district judges' said Monday appropriations to budget director said the Iiiests his office has from to Hospital Board has indi- ndicale increased state slate supreme court it wants nn appropriation ing in the next Iwo from to million more than its cur- "The sky's (he limit, said I'll say one allotment. rector Vernon McKee in Sen. Dorscy budget board, which be- scribing the appropriations San Angclo. joint hearings with Gov. quests to tho 10 member They could have Connally's budget analysis of 12, announced (hat Its In particular, McGee also said, for this week Includes cussed requests for appropriation following meetings udges' by the Texas Waco, Tenth Dlslr He said original on Higher Education, of Civil Appeals, and showed no increase, but colleges and Fifth District Court of ing a report of a State Bar ask for Increases Appeals. mittee, lie has begun to get million lo million for 28 Texarkann, Sixth quests for large pay Court of Civil Appeals. some double the current we slill don't know 28-Tyler, Twellth dis- governor's higher Court of Civil Appeals. Full Holiday Set Saturday Indications were Monday that Memorial Day will be a full-scale holiday in Shot In Race Saturday with nearly all tail establishments Md. (AP) was reported in serious Grocery stores and Guardsmen and markets in Victoria will clashed outbreak was Ihe fourU closed Saturday, night In a two weeks and was describee Leslie Montag, by flying bullets, the most serious in nearly t treasurer of the Victoria grenades, rocks and Guardsmen have been ata dependent Retail guardsmen was shot, In Ihis strife-ridden com injured by an on the eastern shore o Ken Nathan, chairman of the Retail Merchants gas grenade, and a fourlh was Injured by a thrown Bay since last sum mcr, when nearly a dozen per cil of the Chamber of police reported were shot and sovera merce, had previously also were were burned. nounced that other retail establishments would' violence erupted when guardsmen entered Iho tear gas was brought lnt< ilay Monday night after a bar closed. The Victoria Veterans Council Is planning a'pro-; gram in honor of the of Uic city to disperse groups of inlcgrationlsLi as hundreds of whites gathered on the edge of the of rocks and bottles me ;uardsmcn trying lo break U] a Negro demonstration. dead to be held of (lie. wounded or guardsmen had earlle cleared a bordering street o Street Bonds by moving along il wlti fixed bayonets. Many In the crowds of white! heckled the guardsmen anc Sold by Port (aunts at Negroes. About 300 of Die 400 troops stationed in th By MARY BAKER Deparlmenl were on Ihe streets at th< time, attempling lo proven PORT LAVACA City in the amount of between while and Ne cil Monday night voled to the city's portion of Iho extremists. Iho slreet outbreak, like earlier bonds to Rauschcr Pierce the conclusion of the Cambridge, lasted only i of San Anlonlo at a net Councilman K. A. minutes. It was precedcc cost of at 3.2438 rate permission of Iwo hours or more of march interest. The company's to ask a reporter milling and singing by th was the lowest of three of the information for story concerning tho midnight Brig. Gen The general obligation of a M. Gelston, commando authorized by city election lias been discovered In tho guard units said, "al April 7, 1964, are to be of the Porl Lavaca to bo quiet for now." in amounts of Court which whiles had gathered a totaling with both Sunday's Victoria were milling about ant cipal and interest to be paid reporter answered hi their section the First National Bank of are not required least twice groups of Ne Lavaca, beginning Feb. 1, the source of their marched up to inlorsec and semi-annually of Ilaco Slreet and street. In other actions the Uudy Heniion into the Negro quartc. Approved the resolution that in response to confronted guardsmen a the offer made to Willett call made son for the right of way he released the was at a similar confronla demnation settlement for two weeks ago, shorlli needed to widen South business lhal we {in Alabama Gov. George C Slreel. The offer covered made a presidentla for about acre of is tho business of the speech in this racial and for fencing. Accepted the first reading said Ivcndon. If I an" asked a question tense community, that lh< first violence in nearly a yea the speed zono ordinance POUT, Page in Cambridge. erning school Accepted the first reading ol the Stale Highway minute governing the street ments on Highway Tabled the resolution J ciiicntocs ol traffic signs at Live Oak 1 -m. JL .M. jfc. Norlh Virginia Streets for 30 days. Approved appointment of on Public men to police reserve for matron duty for women YORK (AP) A little boy's letter, a pair of we always kept at home.' The pictures, Mrs. Kennedy which was passed as an a tiny stalue will be "animated... be- gency ordinance. Approved the City and a book of poetry. "These are the lie was always in motion' wilh his family as a THE Kennedy, "I hope will show people how he playing with his own chil dren, campaigning. also will be letlers- Mostly cloudy with widely scattered daytime thunder-showers Tuesday and Wednesday. South to southeast winds 8-18 m.p.h. Tuesday's expected High 91 low are among the items put on display Monday night as Mrs. Kennedy and other members of the Kennedy family attended a preview of the exhibit of the late President wrote Ihe most touchini letters as a little boy." One ad mils that he can't remembe things like gloves but can remember books like Ivanhoe Another Is a request to hi SoljDl fVnfrfll for an Increase in hi avuui ctl COnSiu-crable cloudiness Tuesday and Weednesday wilh widely scattered afternoon and evening showers and exhibit will later tour Ihe nation to ralso funds for Ihe Kennedy library to be built at Harvard University. Mrs. Kennedy, In an article allowance so he couk "buy scout things and pay mj own way more around." The carved birds she gave k him, and the little ancient slat nigh Tuesday 85-95. Monday temperatures: Magazine, told how difficult it was to choose what he bought for himself tr Rome. 89T low 74, PrWMnUflHnn of the late president people did not know ri tntfjjuiijQn i i rflCe, Tides (Port Lavaca-Port O'Connor Low at Into the exhibit. "There were the obvious she wrote, "like much he loved old anc beautiful she said, "bu It was just that beauty anc p.ra, and 10i02 Tuesday. High at p.m. Tuesday ind A'fft O vn HJj-ln the coconut 2nd the rocking chair, that everyone that often moved hire most." B.ur a.m. about and would want book of poetry he hat Barometric pressure at In an exhibit like from his sister Eunic< level; 30.04, Tuesday, sunrise 5'Vt I I wanted people lo see the rather personal side of never returned. "He would pick that book ui so I have parted Ihe other poetry books Ihi This Information on from the U.S. of our greatest always lying around on Viclorli objects and EXHIBIT, Put T)   

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