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Advocate Newspaper Archive: May 18, 1964 - Page 1

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Publication: Advocate

Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - May 18, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 11 TELEPHONE HI 5-H51 VICTORIA, TEXAS, MONDAY, MAY 18, 1964 Established Attack Outpost anti-Castro representative body willbe counted Wednesday. Some exiles received ballots t five-man the p flO lyllo, IIL ILIILIlilry Dul command of the unsuccessful day attacking a Most of Stale Sunny, Warm partly cloudy over the state. The Weather Bureau indicated War Talk Buzzes On Cuba Deadline Near On Exile Claim MIAMI, Fla. (API-Periodic short-wave broadcasts telling Cubans that "the hour is very near" were heard Sunday as a showdown approached on pledg- es by militant anli-Castro exiles to go into Cuba. The refugee colony buzzed wilh rumors that revolutionary forces of Manuel Ray, who had set a deadline for Wednesday, Cuba's independence day, al- ready were inside Cuba. Ray's headquarters here declined to confirm or deny Ihe reports. Defcclion Reporled Exiles also predicted strikes by other anti-Castro groups this week. Sharing exildom's topic of of Ihe day was a reporl that Samuel Rodites, Castro confi- dant and former G2, or military intelligence chief, had defected U.S. sources said aulhorilies had a lookout order for him bill denied persistent exile reports that he had arrived at Key Wcsl, Fla., wilh 10 companions. Keeney said Tougaloo was se- Tho short-wave broadcasts, identified as from "Radio Free Cuba, the anli-Communist voice of Cuba transmitting on 40 me- from wilhin Cuban lerrito- ry, urged soldiers, militamen and workers lo rebel against the Castro regime. It said: 'Hour Near' "Forward, people of Cuba. We speak to the land enslaved by Communists. The hour of the traitors is very near." Exiled guerrilla leader Eloy Gutierrez Menoyo, one of Fidel Castro's top military leaders in the revolution that toppled Pres- ident Fulgencio Batisla in 1959, has promised early start of what he called "Plan Omega" warfare inside Cuba. The secret operation was not explained. Rumors that Menoyo already is in Cuba were denied by his headquarters here. Plan Omega Flag Menoyo's Plan Omega flag is that of Cuban Independence hero Jose Marli, killed in action May 19, 1895. On May 19 last year, Menoyo directed a commando attack on militiamen at Taraba Cuba. Exiles also expected further action from forces directed by Bay of Pigs invasion leader miyuacu maximal; uuu murai what vot Manuel Artime to follow up integrity are even more impor- to vou their allack last Wednesday on a Cuban sugar mill. Refugee leaders announced that ballots in a world-wide ex- ile referendum on a proposed 14 Cents WET, COOL AND TICKLISH Wet cement squishing between your toes feels good, and walk- ing in it lets you see where you've been. Craig Behrens, of Worthinglon, Minn., could think of many good reasons why a barefoot boy in spring- time should tickle his toes in "mud." The cement finisher was a man of rare patience who agreed to permit this drama which underscores that Eleventh Street in Worthinglon is gettine new sidewalks. (AP Photo) GIVEN CHALLENGE 59 at St. Joseph Receive Diplomas By PAT WITTE Advocate Staff Writer importance of he laid. "Education represents the u.u.. oalu. UIU A high school diploma ropre- foundation, a basis upon which senls an important milestone, lo build. The fact lhat you now 59 St. Joseph seniors were told have a high school diploma is Sunday nighl, but it is no imporlant, because only about guaranlee of success. one half ot all people in this J. D. Moore, president of Vic- nation of ours have one toria College told the biggest "But your diploma represents graduating class in the schools only the beginning. You still History lhat determinalion. self- imposed discipline and moral lant. want lo minimise the ij IxCtl jf life between idealism and realism to set high goals for themselves but lo remain with- in the limits of reality. He also urged them lo bounce commann 01 me unsuccessful (lay attacking a Vietnamese Above he said, "learn 3061 Cuba invasion. The refer- provincial capital and six her- how to determine what are lha findUm COmmiiloft KfliH Hflr nnctc if tuac ronnrlnfl l-pallv imnrtl-tnnt fKinnc. endum committee said Oliva der posts, it was reported Sun- currently is working in the Pen- day. tagon in Washington. really important things of life and set your goals according An American military spokes- man said 36 defenders were Moore was introduced by the killed, 23 wounded and 10 miss- Rt- Rev. Msgr. F. 0. Beck, ing in a series of sneak attacks pastor of St. Mary's Church and that began at 2 a.m. and con- chairman of the board of the tinned until dawn. school. Monsignor Beck said it A lotal of 87 weapons includ- was particularly fitting to have ing three mortars were cap- Thon, right on the border. This lightly manned post had litlle change in conditions 13 of its defenders killed and 11 through Monday except for pos- wounded before It was overrun sible isolated thundershowers in by superior Viel Cong forces far West Texas. _..... a civic leader and noted cduca- --_ ______ lor of Moor's stature to address centraled their attacks on the Ule school's largest graduating Skies generally were clear to isolated oulposl of Binh Thanh class- lartlv olm.Hv (W, data A capacity audicnce al g[ Mary's Hall witnessed the hour- long ceremony. Scholaslic awards were also issued to the graduates. Charles an American spokesman said Stevenson and Bricklcy George were given gold medals as the class valedictorian ad saluta lorian, respectively. Stevenson was awarded the annual four-year scholarship to St. Mary's University in San Antonio, valued at He also received an award from, the Chemical Society ol Texas given lo Ihc student with the highest grades in chemistry, an Ihe school citizenship award. George received the aware KJT T fm JN TVT TT Viet ifllll VlPtOl'V Hnri T J. T V J-IUIJ m i i s-i ft I in I aritaiTl'a -IU1U 111 S NEW YORK CAP) An American Army captain, killed in South Viet Nam a month ago, wrote to his wife, "We must stand strong and give heart lo a embaltled and confused pco from his letters, published by the Herald Tribune: "It was brought lo my atten- once inadequately equipped and poorly trained and that profes- aim uumuacu ptv- trameu ana mat proies- ple. This cannot be done if sional soldiers came from afar America loses heart." to aid the fledgling American ar- my in its fight (or freedom and Barbara A. Spniill of Suffern, N.Y., widow of Capt. James P. Spruill, made public Sunday portions of his letters to her. In a letter to the editor of the New York Herald Tribune, she ex- pressed the hope "that all Amer- icans would have an opportunity to read them." Spruill was killed April 21. "Above all, tills is a war of mind and he wrote. "For us lo despair would be a great victory for the enemy. "At the moment my heart Is big enough to sustain those around me. Please don't let them, back where you are, sell me down the river with talk of despair and defeat. There Is no backing out of Viet Nam, for !t will follow us everywhere we go. "We have drawn the line here, and the America we all know and love best Is not one to back internal order. "Two of these 'advisers' are well known Von Steuben and Lafayette. It is heartwarming to think that we continue their tra- dition of sacrifice." away." Following otter excerpts "There are many moments of frustration in Viet Nam. Inept- (Set LETTER, Page a Innu ivnv an you become is entirely up e aware from the Southwestern Bell Tele- phone Co. which Is given to the in Ihe sludy of mathematics physics and chemistry, and the work-scholarship from the Union Carbide Co. A tuition scholarship granted by the Board of Trustee! (See DIPLOMAS. Page 8) Victorian Named To Credit Post _. Mrs. Claire Dlelzel of Victoria ness, dishonesty, lack of spirit, was elected treasurer of Ihe confusion and laziness cause Lone Star Council of Credit them. But that is exactly why Women Sunday In San Anlonio we are here. It is exactly in where Ihe statewide organiza- placcs and In circumstances 'ion is holding its annual meet- such as this lhat communism Ing- gains Its foothold." Miss Maggie Kinari! of Dallas was elected president according "I know that you read nowa- to the Associated Press. Other days of defeat or of lack of prog- officers choaen were Mrs. Arlene ress. None of U bothers me be- Taylor of Austin, first vice- cause I am convinced that we president; Mrs. Viola Hall of can win it and win It decisive- Abilene, second vice-president; ly." Mrs, Louise Goforth of Orange, "I have a project. It Is a pro- recording secretary, and Mrs. posal to train men in night com- Marie Amador of Houston, finan clal Mcretary, East Berlin Fist Fights Break Out Youth Rally Action Scene BERLIN (AP) Western bor- der guards reported Sunday light fist fights broke out among jlue-shirted members of the Communist youth brought to Sast Berlin for a huge rally. They said Red police moved in with nightsticks drawn to break up the rows. Unruly crowds gathered in scattered districts of East Ber- in after the breakup of a big march by hundreds of thousands of young people staged as a massive propaganda display. Western observers watched over the wall elected by the Comniunisls to keep tiicir peo- ple in. Oa iUiiin Sheet The first incident happened n the Karl Marx Allo, East Bcr- in's main street. Then, the Western guards re- wrtcd, Communist police broke up another large crowd which gathered at the Red wall near a crossing point into the French sector of West Berlin. There was no word on the cause of the fighting. It was not known whether there were any arrests. Another throng could he seen n Unter den Linden which leads o the Brandenburg Gate. Police Prepared The East German authorities were well prepared for trouble as they took the risk of holding he first big youth rally In East Berlin m 10 years. The guards along the Berlin wall were reinforced. Sxtra police patrols were on he streets. Armored cars were seen moving into the city Satur- day. During the last rally in 1954, before the wall, hundreds of v'oungsters seized Die chance to escape. For Five Hours The official East German news agency, ADN, said people marched for five iiours past their Communist leaders. Brandt, who is now in Wash- ington; said in his taped address that most East German youths were not Communist. "In recent years we hove learned to see through the out- ward form of the uniforms, ban- ners and he said. There were plenty of uniforms, manners and thundering drums on show. The uniformed youths march- 3d 60 abreast across East Ber- lin's Red square the Marx- Engels Platz and cheered as Jiey passed a tribune packed with Communist officials. The East German Communist leader, Waller Ulbricht, smiling waved at them. Ulbricht pre- dicted in opening the' youth MOSCOW Commu- nist party Sunday announced the death of presidium member Otto Vigclmovich Kuusinen, one of the last direct links of the party leadership with Lenin. He was 82. Tass said death was caused ay cancer of the liver followed by massive hemorrhages. Kiiusinen's death left a vacan- cy on the parly's 12-man pre- sidium, supreme' ruling body of the Soviet Union, which indicat- ed an imminent shakcup in the power elite. There was speculation that Premier Khrushchev would cut short his Egyptian trip ami that first deputy Premier Anaslas Mikoyan would rush homo from rally Saturday that all of Ger- many would be Hed-mlcd by the year 2000. Communist commentators said lhal youngsters were In town for the mammoth youth rally sponsored by the Com- munist Free German Youth (FGY) organization. The West Berlincrs were up early, loo. They streamed (See FIGHTS, Page C) Today's Chuckle A man may not know where his next dollar is com- ing from, but MIC chances arc Iiis wife knows where il's going. U.S. Seeks to Halt Hot War in Laos NIKITA DUE TO ACT Soviet Shakeup of Elite Seen as Top Red Dies Tokyo to take a direct hand in the reshuffle. Apparently considering Kuusi- nen an amenable follower, Khru- shchev had him appointed to the presidium in July 1957 when he ousted Georgt Malenkov, Vache- slov Mololov and Lazar Kngaiio nti ttn "anH-not-Hf" oi-miTi vich as an The now Neiv Racket Gets Rolling LONDON (AP) Police said Sunday they are work- ing to stamp out a phony letter racket that uses the nam Beat pret So I let IIIJ'B Gl gclll offci star Bcal with let. Pi man girls report hat of Viktor Grislun, a cnn- disturbed by didale member of (ho presidium "anil-party necessary shifting about also provides an opportu- nity to replace ailing Frol Koz- lov, incapacitated by a stroke, and Nikola! Shvornik who, at 76, is also in poor health. Who Is In lino for the presidi- um was, as usual, nol known In advance. It would obviously he one of the new men who have grown up in communism's man- agerial class and the ment will mark another step away from the old revolutionary traditions. Both Soviet, British Aid Requested Husk Confers Wilh Dobrynin WASHINGTON (AP) The iorts of heavy l.E re- Communist at- Sovicl Union, Britain and olhcr another member who will follow him as loyally as Kuuslnen, Kuusinen, a renegade Finn who bccamo a top Soviet lead- er, will be buried in lied Square Tuesday following a slalo funcr- nterested powers Sunday to do everything possible to stop the ighling and save the neutrality f the small Southeast Asian al. As recently as Aug. 30, 195B, Secretary of State Dean Rusk called Soviet Ambassador Ana- oly F. Dobrynin to an cxlraor- a puppet Soviet government dur- ing the Russian invaison of Kin- (Scc EL1T13. Pago 6> Violent Death Hits 31 Over Texas ASSOCIATED cnco al (he State Department. Earlier. Uusk conferred with British Minister Denis A. Green- till on tlie situation in Laos. Conferences Held In the courso of the day Rusk also conferred with rcprosenla- Ivcs of India, Canada, and Po- nnd three countries which make up an International Con- rol Commission charged with supervising the two-year-old Geneva agreement which for- mally established tho neutrality Sol dont weekend. Esles called Mrs. A MOMENT LATER An looks on just a moment a ground, was struck by a Va. The accident occurred city bus on his way home fr seriously hurt. (AP Photo) oi me rocK 'np roll es quartet as a lure (or y British (ccn-agc girls. nr the sources of the or s apparently arc a cry. Is all over Britain arc ig letters, police naauiiAir.u 1-Ktaa At least 31 persons met violent deaths In Texas over the weekend with 14 of Ihe deaths attributed to traffic accidents. Tho Associated Press tabulation started al 6 p.m. Friday and continued to midnight found slabbed to death in South Dallas early Sunday. He was not immediately Identified. Invesllgotors said they wore told the stabbing followed an argument at a tavern. Roger Clyde Hcnson, 22, of Irving drowned Sunday Laos. Rusk conferred also wilh representatives of governments which belong to Ihe Southeast Asia Trcaly Organization. Apart trom the Uniled Slates and Britain those governments are Trance, Australia, New Zealand, ng Ihcin.such things as parls In a film wilh The bodies of a In Norlh Lake in the northwest section of Thailand and Ihc Phll- es or suggesting dnlcs members of Ihe. quar-llce and Ihe Beatles' ngcment appealed lo and their parents, (o rt receipt of any such rs anil hand them in (o h o r 1 1 i c s, even when iccl identified as Mr. and Mrs. L. I. Slrickland, were found at Mountain Creek Lake in Dallas County Sunday. Both had been shot In the head. Emply .45 shells were in tho urea but no weapon was found. Justice of the Peace ruled homicide in the double shooting. A middle-aged Negro Storey, 36, of Arling ton was misslug after he dived off a burning boat at Lako Ar llngton Sunday. Two compan Ions said tho engine of their small boat caught flic and all hrcc jumped Inlo .the water bill Storey did not reappear. A search for his body continued ate With LBJ Earlier, Rusk lunched with President Johnson and officials said they assumed that the problems of Laos were discussed although Ihe While House luncheon actually had been agreed on before the latest Southeast Asian emergency developed. In Laos itself, neutralist Prem- milk truck hit a bridge Souvanna Phouma reported Hie Sol Denies Story mt He Visited on the northeast edge )f Dallas, and driver John Franklin, 42, of Irving was crushed to dealh under the overturning trailer Saturday Commanlst forces had launched a large-scale attack in tho Plnlno des Jnrres where government-held territory is defended by neutralist troops under Gen. Kong Lc. ,ENE, Tex, iles, the bankrupt Wesl promoter, denied Sunday 1 that he had crossed the wrder inlo not been in E! Paso Salur-lay and had nol gone to Mexico. She- snid lhat her husband was at home but would not come to the Barrera, 62, was struck and kilted Salurday nigfil n Laredo by a car which police said did rot. slop. His rtcaU) was Ihe firsl Ihis year in Laredo (AP> -Premier Souvanna Phouma snid Sunday lhat Communist forces have launched a large-scale attack on neutralist positions In the avcn't been in Mexico, I ntcnd lo he told s Richardson of the Abi-leporter-News In a local ne inlcrvlew. who has been making ne m Abilene while free eal bond after his convlc-federal mail fraud Chronicle said it was told by Horace Harris, officer In charge of the. Houston office of he Immigration Service lhat if Estes crossed tho border he would bo hi violation of an order >y the U. S. Immigration and Valurolizalion Service, which ruled Esles could not leave killed Mrs. Johnnie Mae Baker, 27, Snlurday al rier home In Fort Worlh and the Inquest verdict was murder Her husband, city slrccl department worker Russell Baker, 35 was laken to a hospital in grave condition from a bullet wound Plnino dcs Jarres region In north-central Laos. The Intcrnallonal Control Commission, set up by the 1062 Geneva accords lo supervise Laos' beleaguered neutrality, underlined Ihe gravlly of Ihe slluation by hnslily evacuating Us observer (cam from Ihe area. to say whether pending appeal of Indian member ot Ihc ob- en in El Paso during of federal charges Louise Tatc died team, which had been as fire swept her home as watchdog in the Plaino Houston Chronicle said in righted slory Sunday lhat and Iwo other men 1 the border Into is freo on appeal on the mall fraud charge. Penalty for violation of Ihe immigration order is a Passershy found her liusband, William Tatc, col lapsed on Ihc front porch anc dragged him clear of the Iho pasl year, said on arrival in Vientiane that they might not have made it out if commission hcllcoplcrs had arrived IS min- cr Sunday, newsmen had Ihe Estcs home where Sstes said her of or a maximum prison term of five years, or bolh, he Chronicle quoled M. Carle, 62, was found falnlly shot at his San later. A Canadian observer said the situation at Gen. Kong Le's DEATHS, Page See U.S., Page slory by Bo Byers, Ihe Chronicle Austin IN Estcs, smiling and _ a white Palm Beach suit, turned aside all questions, He kissed the little Set as one of the men before crossing the Santa Fe Street Bridge lo Juarez, Mexico, the Chronicle Teacher "Good-bye, he told her, giving her a hug before LAKE CITY, Ulah (AP) Ulnh school officials pledgee Sunday to try lo hold of Delegates of trie UEA, which represents most of the state's teachers. w Chronicle reporter said he followed them to Mexico and Tuesday despite a threatened walkout by the slate's public delegates said their action was lakcn "lo protest the refusal of Ihc governor ESTES, Page D. Clyde to act upon J resolution adopted by the Utah School Boards recommendations of his school study committee." boards would altempl committee recommended I cloudy Monday and Tuesday, wilh liltle temperature change, daytime south and southeast winds 10 lo 20 m.p in a normal manner to conduct schools." However, the resolulion was nol binding on Iho local a report last week lhat Clyde call a special legislative session to appropriate on addillonal million for "crilical" school I Monday temperatures: 65, high did not explain how classes could be conduclcd If He refused. The action by tho school Central Texas: to appear. T. II. Bell, Ulah association left It up to iocal boards whether to order and warm Monday and Tuesday. High Monday 85-95. Sunday lemperatures: High of public Instruction, said Ihc resolulion was Ihs only ac-Jon the school boards In their districts to rc-wrt for classes or to declare heir schools closed. has somo public (Port La vac a Indicated there would children. Highs at attempts by Ihe slato the state attorney and p.m., lows tho teachers back to office issued an opin- p.m. and a.m. after a mass meeting lhat the schools could not identified Barometric pressure at a e scheduled for Tuesday n Salt Lake legally closed unless the days were declared holidays. Pre- r Mark Flagge, Ulah Education tho local boards could at Charloltesvillc, er Mark got off a school. He was Monday sunrise Tuesday This tnformitlon on tftti from lb< U.S. BurMu Victoria OllKt. WMifcff which called the walkout, has said lhal meeting will decide what further action the teachers will take. The walkout wu ordered Saturday by holidays if Ihev wished. The opinion added thai schools could bo closed If chll-dren show up (or classes but teachers do not.   

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