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Advocate Newspaper Archive: May 16, 1964 - Page 1

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - May 16, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 9 TK1XPHONE IU 5-1451 Exiles Hit Cuba Two New Blows Koa Protests Earlier Raid WASHINGTON (AP) A re- port of a second and third thrust against Castro Cuba's coast de- veloped here Friday against a background of Havana protests against Wednesday's blow at a Cuban sugar mill. Quoting unidentified U.S. gov eminent sources, the Washing (on Star reported two ant Castro Cuban exile organiza tlons landed forces on the north ern and southern shores of Ui island Friday morning. The Citizens Committee for Free Cuba, an exile organiza (ion based here, confirmed th landings but gave a somewha different version. Under Cover It said the infiltrations were carried out Wednesday morning rather than Friday, under cove of the diversion created by th attack on Port Pilon in Province, easternmost of the Cuban states. Havana did not confirm or comment on the reported nev, landings but a Cuban broadcas monitored in Miami indicate; building tension in the Commu nisi regime. The governmen communications network direct ed its radio operators to report for work Saturday normally an off day for them "on ac count of the present crisis." The order added, "We mus be broadcasting tomorrow with our guard up." Sugar Destroyed But while the Cuban govern ment'was silent on the reportee new landings, it carried to the United Nations its protes against the Port Pilon raic which it has conceded brotrgh the destruction of some TO.OO' bags of sugar. Cuban Foreign Minister Hau Hoa in a note to U.N. Secretary General O Thant charged tha the U.S. Central Intelligent Agency is directing attacks from bases in Florida, Puerto Rico and Central America. Roa told Thant that peace might bi endangered by such activities. The Cuban official said th arison of the way in which hree different artists view a tarticular subject, j WO Entries All pictures entered this 200 of them be on display in the V i 11 a g e through 4 p.m. Satur- day, at which time the "popular vinner" will be announced. The wpular winner is Ihe .-picture chosen by Ihe visiting public as nost interesting, and will re- ffered for sale, and there are innumerable items of high tech nnumerae ems o gh tech- .ey were ae o wa rom nical quality which might fit North Korean captors to a nto a particular place in the United Nations car which took average home where a picture to a hospital for a s particularly adapt- physical checkup. able for this purpose are sev- eral monochromes which w i 1: it into almost any decor. Bob Friedell Jr. discovering the mystery "shot" in the nighl at his house which turned oul to be a bicycle tire blowout Henry Skopal telling about wind makers in Arizonia, but local farmers wanting to hear aboul rain making M. G. Lalimer resting nicely at Citizen's Hos- pital after his lung collapsed Miss Valerie Conli under- going sgrgery at De Tar Me- morial Hospital T. M, Mor- rison Jr. making a late visit lo Ihe Post Office Eva Bar- rios reminding friends and mem- bers of Our Lady of Sorrows Calholic Church of the Chick- en Barbecue In the Lions Area of the City Park, Sunday, from until p.m. at 51 a plate as a benefit for a church fTlpj-.li.! queen contestant, Rosarlo Lop- rz Mrs, Ed Sager admit- ling that somedays a person would do better if they'd have stayed at home the 0. W. Friars over from Cuero on business Mn. El- der finding that her daughter's June wedding plans are keep- ing her busy Cllal Ltnier explaining that a busy person Js a happy person Daji CofemM remanding Victo- ria Country Club members that Ihe swimming pool will be open on today and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m aod on weekdys during afternoons. VICTORIA, TEXAS, SATURDAY, MAY .16, 1064 Established _______ ART TROPHIES Mrs. Jo Cald- well, left, and Mrs. Marie Dunn are shown above with the trophies they won for their portraits In the cur- rent Village Arcade Art Show, while Sister Kathleen is shown tiejiter ac- cepting the trophy won by Sister M. Noreen Siebenhausen, who could not be present. (Advocate Photo) One Art Subject U.S. Pulls Wins Two Prizes Out Of Germany The same face won two A. B. J. Hammell Trophies nday in the annual Village Arcade Art Show. It was the face of Mrs. Antonio Peria painted in charcoal by Mrs, Marie Dunn and in pastels by Mrs. Jo Caldwell. The two pictures took sweepstakes awards in their respective media, while the trophy for the best Red Korea Frees Two U.S. Pilots PANMUNJOM, Korea ir lauip. men uupenacnis, averag- iwo American helicopter pilots about 300 per battalion, will v FRANKFURT, Germany CAP) --The United States'started on Friday withdrawing five Army combat units that were rushed to Europe in the Berlin wall crisis of 1961. Military sources said the movement will require six or eight weeks. Fifty soldiers made up the vanguard. They took off from the Rhein Main base outside Frankfurt for Ft. Bragg, N.C. Of the or so other men uivolved, most will return by shot down over North Korea a year ago were released Satur- day. A U.N. spokesman said the given "a re- ceipt admitting, in part, "es- ceive the Gummbacher Award hvo W. presented by Village Glidden 2, A' norencP' Capt. Cbarleton W. m Center vjutu K t yuiii, _Most pictures in the show arc Mich., appeared in uiij MCI-UI. Dutieiary, Aorean For those just looking, and Hnn Joo-kyung, handed out not shopping, the show has great copies of the receipt for the pi- 'ancty of style and subject mat- tc v... IT er, although traditional land nd seascapes dominate and are among some of the belter vorks. Abstracts, Composite A few abstracts and a single lontage are to he found amng he portraits, fruit and newer till lifes, crumbled walls, anch and woodland scenes, n brook flanked by uaking aspens, and "Cafe do a Mere which could e a Paris scene but might also e found in Hong Kong juclg- ng by the female figure in the ackground which looks for all -he world like Suzie Wong. In addition to the trophies, ibbons and cash prizes donat- talk to them, d by Village merchants were warded in various categories f the three genera! classifica- ons. These were the winners in Air Force lUaj. Gen. Cecil E. Combs, senior U.N. Com- mand representative on the Mil- itary Armistice Commission. The Reds said the receipt was delivered to them two days ago. A U.N. Command spokesman confirmed that the receipt ad- mitted in part charges the Com- munists had leveled against the two Americans. Slutls smiled briefly as ho stepped into the car. Words spoken by tho freed pilots dur- ing the short exchange ceremo- ny were not heard by ncws- icn. Newsmen were not allowed to Landscapes: First place, Sis- er M. Norcen's brilliantly back- ightcd woodland scene execut- "tl wilh palette knife; second lace, "Ml. by Bob- lie Bird; third, "Aulumn in tfamagpuchi, by Dal- nart Windberg; fourth, "County by Harold Nichols. Other Tupes Marines: First place, "T h e 3olden by Jean [Yankcnburger; second, "Sea Slill life: First place, "Sim- by Dalhart Windberg; PIclc sach a" (See ART, Page 3) [Jail Scheduled An electric service inlcrrup- on has been scheduled between :I5 and p.m. Sunday by entral Power and Light Co., T three Victoria areas. They will include Port Lavaca oad from-Cameron lo Juan mm DeLeon to Port Lavaca am! North .East Water :rect from East Sfrecl to Juan inn. romptly as possible, J. B. Wil good heaUh' T.hey were able to walk from Minutes before the ceremony in the demilitarized zone, the Communist secretary, Korean lots, signed on May IS, by U.S. A 1.. Hr-i J-l n .1 be flown home. JFK Move President John F. Kennedy's administration moved supply troops and about combat soldiers to Germany shortly after the East German Communists started Aug. 13, I9G1, to build the concrete bar- rier that since has divided Ber- lin. Withdrawal of the supply Iroops began a year Inter. H was completed several months ago. The U.S. Defense Depart- ment announced April 10 that Ihe combat units would return ionic. They are the 4lh Battalion of the 68th Armored Regiment, is first in line; Ihree ar- Jllery battalions and a cavalry regiment. The armored battal- ion will embark about May 28. Prefer Slates They were attached to the LJ.S. 7th Army stalioned in West Germany. Most are quartered n the area of Mannheim, 50 miles south of Frankfurt. ville, N.C pSgl. Clyde Blackwell, 27, of 12 Cents Oregon Voters Favor Rockefeller in Upset Wind Caves Store Roof In Borger 40 Shoppers Spared Injury ny Tin: ASSOCIATED A violent wind slorm, de- jcribed by some persons as a tornado, collapsed tho roof of a crowded Borgcr supermarket in ho Texas Panhandle late Fri- day. The turbulent outburst came as scattered thunderstorms moved across the Panhandle- Plains and North Central Texas during an otherwise calm day. Borger police and firemen dug into tho nibble trying lo de- ermine if anyone was buried. 3arly Friday night all persons n the store apparently had been accounted for. Sign Toppled rnvestigulors found the wind lad toppled a huge sign, weigh- ng several thousands pounds, onto the roof, causing it to col- npse. Approximately 40 shoppers were in the Holt Food Store vhen the high wind ripped out a section of the southwest cor- ner wall and a SO-foot-square area of roof fell in, Clerks in tile store said It 'was just like a tornado hit." They said there was a "whoose" and the roof gave way. Like Freight Train Mrs. Alice Holt, wife of Ihe jrocer, said tile collapse of the HOUSTON Disl. Judge Miron Love reported to authori- ties Friday he has been threat- ened twice recently by an anon- ymous telephone caller, appar-1 ently because of tho Ashley- Lima case. "The same man called again last night and said he was car- rying a .45 pistol and that ho was going to kill Love said. ASHLEY CASE Dim Hopes Mystery Voice For Lodge Menaces Judge Candidacy Barry, Nixon Battle for 3rd PORTLAND, Ore. Nelson A. Rocke- to an upset victory "He called my homo last month and represented himself us an agent of the Federal Bu- reau of Investigation and then began using vile language and making threats. "Apparently ho is stimulated was ruled Insane Thursday by a Whnrlon County jury. Love had transferred the case there be- cause.of widespread news cov- erage 'it hnri received here. Miss Lima was n witness at the hearing. Ashley and Miss Limn were convicted and assessed the death penalty before Love here w r Si WffiittaM.t5 HKtt soaked with gnso'ilno and set afire. A federal court granted the pair new trials and Miss Lima was convicted of murder with- out malice at her second trial hopes lorheaii tills year. oul mmlcc al ncr scconn trial by newspaper accounts of the before Love hero ill March. She trial of Carolyn Ann Lima." ls now spying a five-year prls Leslie Douglas Ashley, 25, on sentence. In the process. Rockefeller defeated tho absentee candida- cy of Henry Cabot Lodge, U.S. ambassador to South Viet Nam. Lodge had surprised tho politi- cians by winning Mow Hamp- shire's 14 votes in a write-in landslide in that state's primary in March. Long-Dlitance Appeal But his long-dlstanco appeal to Oregon's voters placed him second to Rockefeller and thus dimmed any likelihood lhat he would return from Saigon to at- lempl to win (he nomination. Twelve underclassmen at SI. Joseph High School Sen- Barry Cloldwatcr of Arl- zona. the lop collector of con- St. Joseph Cites Twelve Students ni. KJI.. uuacjJII OV..1UU1 were honored Friday with a High Honors Gold Medol, given only to slndenls with a grade average of SO per roof sounded like a freightlcenl or higher in conduct raln. A cook at a restaurant'earn the award, across tho street said her stove' Winning the Gold Medals were bounced off Uio floor at the'Anthony Olsovsky, a junior; same lime. ;Daniel llcbner, Larry M a r c k Some Borger rcsidcnls living nichard Pozzl and Robert Wear- about10 blocks from Ihe store den, Dennis Pozzl, Gregory Sta- lescriueu (lie brief winds as ..___ with no grade lower than 85 for oiilire vcar. 'V ni. A stuctcnt musl also maintain an average of 90 per Oregon "balloting P returns mounted. The count from of the places funnel cloud. They said Ihere was a slight breeze and sudden- y trees were whipped by the vind. There was no rain and no olh er wind during the brief storm although winds damaged s drive-in and knocked down a anve-in ana Knocked down a usscmmy. acn ign and antenna at Borger enr- 'or? w'" be recognized fo ier in the afternoon. 'ne'r scholastic achievement tvugqns TOnplert oiimmy iu Luinmenccmcni Just outside Borgcr winds exercises at St. Mary's Hall, lew over two wnirnns whlnh Honors Certificates were also )lew over two wagons which were part of a 2J-wngon Imin naking a monlh-long trip from Spearman lo Graham. They verc parked a shorl distance rom tho other wagons and mule teams at the time of the slorm. Lubbock and Amarillo also re- thunderstorms. At Lub- )0ck, whero .75 of an Inch of was reported, there was i lujrtjiiL-u, mere was may liked it in Germany blowing dust earlier in the aft- jut prefer being back in the ernoon. United said LI. Col. Maximum temperatures James F. Mclnlosh, 42, of Ashe- ranged from 79 degrees at Gal- t-t, L' ui cun.iLa lor wiirm N.C., summed up temperatures Saturday with his impressions this way: "The wall is ugly. After 1'ti .7 ub'j- 'invi i u uiu u.Mreniu west portion ol seen it, I knew why we'd come Texas and partly cloudy skies over. But I m glad we arc re- elsewhere. A few thunderstorms turning home now. Thirty-four were predicted in the northern months abroad is a long time." Those winners were Ray Purgac, junior; Larry Gobar, Millon McDonnell, Tom Post, Andres Urbano, Steve Borowicz and Bill Murphy, sophomores; and Lnrry Tagliabtio, Robert Quilla, William Grcgoreyk, Gregory Masscy and Stephen VanMctre, freshmen. llcllglnn Award Tho Thomas O'Connor Memo- Hcligion Award is given lo clear to partly cloudy skies in slmlcnts who allain the highest he extreme west portion of in of These winners were Hal Rcd- 'eston to 100 at Presidio. Forecasts called for warm part of the state. Globe-TouringLadyPilots Eye Flight to Settle Feud LONG BEACH, Calif. Ohio's and California's two glohc-girdling lady pilots agreed tentatively Friday amid hot a showdown to deter mine which is the better flier. But each wanted a different route. Jerrle Mock, a suburban Co- fie that at times exceeds Rooke; third, "Evening at Rock- ,k by Ura Richey; and j ourth. by Nell Ia5.d'. C.al1'- But Joan Merriam Smith of lumbus housewife, proposed _ Guam and Oak- easy rpule? If she wants to fly a dif- 'icult route, Jet her fly arounc the equalor." Mrs. Mock covered the Guam- Oakland roule In less lhan a week on her 29-day, 22.858-mile round-the-world flight in a sin- gle-engine She returned to Columbus April 17. The Guam-Oakland hop took Mrs. Smith, plagued by me- chanical difficulties, more than hree weeks on her 57-day flight n a twin-engine craft. She flew u. in.p.n, axpeciea Saturday temperatures: High 90 lrv.it D i-----n, w u M in a i w ill-dig lira CTBH, Jjne HCW Inn Street, Juan Linn Street miles to retrace much of mm AJ-.M _____. the fatal equatorial route of Amelia Earhart, "The Pacific Route was the c'" easiest part of my whole Service will bo restored as Mrs. Smith bulsied. "There are rnmnHv ac I D lull ._ good radio aids, good wealhtr, iC 'i i-mr raoio BIOS, good wealhtr, on, local OPL manager, said. lexcclleat forecasllag and traf- If it j u'u i oon i Know wnerc it start- Hollywood freeway. You can'ed. I got home very peacefully talk to people all day." last Wednesday and all of a sud- y an a o a su Just who hurled the pJcrric Mock started dial wno nunea me Jcrnc IVIOCK started cnal- lo a showdown race wasn't'lcnging and raving and ranting, clear. The word in Columbus' "J will say this much: racing was that It came from Mrs.'around Ihe world, barnstorming Cntttli Uiil _..U1 !_II.. __.. Smith, but she said: THE WEATHER Partly cloudy and continued warm Saturday and Sunday with daytime southeast winds at 12 to 22 and publicity stunts went oul wilh the wind In the 30s. J am not interested in a race unless the lady would like to fly the route that I just flew, f think Ibis could be a real experience for her. I would recommend a twin-engine airplane for her Expected own safety. low 65. Soulh Central Texas: Partly cloudy and continued warm Saturday through Sunday except considerable late night and ear- y morning cloudiness. Highs Safurday 85 to 05. Friday Temperatures: High 87, low 62. TMes (Port O'- Connor High at a.m. Saturday. Low at a.m. Sat- urday. Barometric pressure at sea evel: 30.04. Sunset Saturday: Sun-i rise Sunday: 536. This Information baitd on dilj 'rom Ihe U.S. Weather Bureau Victoria orrice. Mrs. Smith, 27, said (hero is 'no doubt in my mind" lhat she's tho heller flier, wilh "probably 10 limes Ihe experi- ence." She said she has accu- mulated hours In 11 years and has taught probably 500 people lo fly. Mrs. Mock said she doubted he race would come off and her par Help alion would depend on "Ihe kind of race it Is." Shci [hen suggested Guam-Oak-! and. She to-mod the 'a poor loser." '77' wgisimuun win oe on uio Mrs. Smith relorlcd: "I don't IrM day of each session wilh consider myself a loser. I [lew classes beginning the second ha I kit t ft_J__ he route lhal f published. I'm day. not the one who's making alibis Ihis, J nines Welder, John Wright and John Gormcly, soph- omores; and Michael Filley and Robert Stevenson, f r e a sh- Only Unilcrclnssmcii Only underclassmen wore honored at Ihe assembly. Scn- for Sunday night at commencement on Ihe hallot, votes from precincts. Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace had about 500 write-In votes. awarded to students who at lalncd an average of 85 per ccnl, wilh no grmle lower than an (10 per ccnl and with an av- erage of at least 90 per cent in the varsity band. Hero aro the 17. ones who received letters: in the Democratic primary Tliree-year-Ictlermcn Mob- President Johnson, unopjwsed crt Bailey, Eddie Dlschinger, Ted Schoenljcrg, Richard Perez and Malt Vianes. Two-yeor-lcUermen Donald Pellcgrino, Uudy Mike Phillips, Henry Ramirez and Tim Byrne. Mark 0. Halfield called Fiockc- Onc year lettcrmcn Gor- feller's victory "the upset of man Prince, Raymond Carba- "1Q year." jnl, Tom Soliz, Stove Borowicz, William umaii, Mike Heyna, Fred Sandhop and Oregon campaign manager, Larry Tagllahue. talked to the New York gover- Grude school band members 9J1 toe telephone, and told mon and Anthony Olsovsky, juniors; Michael Phillips and Dennis Pozzi, sophomores; and Michael Fillcy and William1 Gregorcyk, freshmen. Six students wore given the Library Assistants Award. These were Hobcrt Barrienlos, Allen Baass, Charles Krejci, To o n y Olsovsky, Thomas Rcspontlek and Charles VonMelrc. Bookkeeping Awards, given (o those who complete! the course '1 don't know where it start- wilh high honors grades, were awarded lo Felix Garcia, Mike Rivera, Chartcs Krejci' John W if Street' Rouse, Paul Tagliabue and Brickley George was second, and Douglas Kruppa and Rich- ard Byars received honorable menllon. Thomas Kailiis also received a citation as SI. Joseph's repre- sentative at Boys' Slate. Loiters were awarded those boys who participated in who received letters were Donald Kruppa, John Carver, Mike Drost, Carl Fabro, Ken Marcs, James Rossclt, Joo Va lalik, Mark Jordan, Jimmy Al1 lllrcc Iclevlslon nct- Knippa, Joe Carruth, llowland Rockefeller the Ciillcy, Ron Spears, Lurry Ko-wlnner after Ihe polls var, Mike Brown, Nick Holm (See STUnE3NTS, Pngc 3) Today's Chuckle Anyone who llilnks our country Is oul of (he woods should visit a golf course on a weekend, primary. stick-lo-it all other Oregon's 18 votes ticket con- velltlon delegates at this polnl, s ale's polling showed Rockefeller Lodge Goldwaler 31 830 W. Scrnnton At lhal point Rockefeller was getting 33 per cent of the voles Lodge 27, Goklwaler 13, Nixon Upset Of Year Oregon's Republican Gov. William Walsh, Rockefeller's him II was the biggest upset he could remember, Rockefeller's cam- miiMj uiusi, uun tar.re, Ken ceeers cam- Garcia, Ed Machicck, John in Oregon was fantas- Maros. Jnmp.? tic. the" JunTS California primary, where Rockefeller and Goldwater meet head-on in a contest (or the state's US convention dele- [fltcs. There were reports that (Sec VOTERS, Page S; FINANCIERS SHOCKED Suicide Brings Audit By Wall Street Firm NEW YORK (AP) One of firm, which has nearly Oratorical Awards es odered of its books Friday In the wake of the spectacular and mysleri- branches and assets mil- lion. Spokesmen for bolh the New York Slock Exchange and the vioiuriuui nwarus 01 uic speciacuiar ana mysleri- York Slock Exchange and the The local American Legion'0115 shotgun suicide of ils prcsi- federal Securities and Exchange Post honored those Tho tragedy shocked said (here was no rtnrHflnatflfl In lha fijldncla] who participated in the school's oratorical contest, ft e c e Ivin; recognition were David Balboa first place winner in (he SI Joseph contest; and Charles Stevenson and Kirk Jordan. Charles Stevenson was tho first place winner of the Le- gion's Good Cllizcnship Award financial world. The firm Insisted that it is a Summer Class Times Revealed Summer classes at Victoria Jollcge will be divided Into two six-week sessions, according to Registrar Lcona Jones. Tho first session begins June and ends July 10. The sec- tnd will be from July 13 through August 21, Registration will be on Iho i r v> iwm-u TIIIIUII-. iruiaiuii i uixjj imuy was himself Thursday nlghl In the dissalisflcd because his firm re- headquarters of hb brokerage ecived an allocation of only 23 'Irm, IVatslon Co., fnc. at 74 500 shares, which ho did not con- Wall Street. He shol himself to sidcr large enough Registration for the fall term L lor uie laii lerm Walslon's tv.o sons, Carol and or trying to justify my flight." has been set (or Sept, 8 to 10. Jack, are vice of Uw sound and going concern. The cullies. indication that the brokerage house was in any financial diffl- audit, to be made at the close of business May 28, was de- scribed as purely precaution- ary. Copies will be sent to all Ila customers, Vernon C. Walston, 58, killed Only Wednesday, Walslon i Co. dropped out as a prospec- tive underwriter of new stock for the Communlcalions Satel- lite a commercial space venture. Walslon reportedly was 11 firm, IVatslon Co., me. a I 74 Wall Street. He shol himself U death amid trophies he had col- ecled during years of big-game hunting. No note was found. His firm Issued a slatcment which said In parl: "The untimely death of Mr. Valslon will not affect the capl- at status of the corporation and I will continue to serve the public as previously. A senior officer of Ihe firm hns staled hat the Walslon family Inter A newspaperman who Inter- viewed Walstoti only seven lours before Ihe sufclde wrole hal Ihe broker was "In a stale )f considerable agliatlon" and iad said in reference (o the (200-mllllon satellite corpora- tion slock issue that "they lldn't eul It up fnlr." The newspaperman, David R Francis, New York business hat the Walslon family Inter- correspondent of tho Christian csls w II remain actively in- Science Monitor, quoted Wai- My.ng. a a qunslniibHc offering volved In the business. Walston's tv.o sons, Carol and ston thing on (See   

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