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Advocate Newspaper Archive: May 12, 1964 - Page 1

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Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - May 12, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 5 TELEPHONE HI 1-1411 VICTORIA, TEXAS, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 1964 Established 184ft Low Bid Questioned At College Cost Too High On Dorm Plan By HENRY WOLFF JR. Advocate Sfaff Writer Trustees of Victoria College opened bids Monday afternoon for the conversion of Ihe col- lege's existing men's dormitory into a classroom building but refused to accept (he low bid of by Amos J. Hosei Construction Co. as submitted. Several portions of the bid were found unacceptable. One item for a proposed covered walkway was especially undersirable to the board. It turned the mai- ler of lefling a bid over lo its building and grounds cominil- tee, instructing it to drop the covered walkway altogether and to negotiate for a more acceptable re-bid on the elec- trical porlion of the over-all bid. Unanimous Vote J. C. Ault and Robert Kick, who represent the college as Ihe engineering and architec- tural firm on Ihe project, had originally anticipaled lhat the conversion would cost approxi- mately The walk was estimated at Concerning Ihe covered walk, Truslee Earl Cliburn asked, "Do we need Ault replied, "At that price, I would rather see it out." "I think is out of pro- portion wilh what we're trying lo do over Cliburn said. Electrical Bid The trustees voted unani- mously to drop the 300-foot walk when a bid is let. In answer to a question by Dr. C. P. Montier concerning the electrical section of the bid, Ault said his firm had esll- mated it would take lo make required changes. The unaccepted bid set up for electric changes, including some Ault said he did no think necessary. He said he ii reviewing .the electrical prq posals in steps being taken to reduce the cost of the project. He also told Ihe board i. mighl want to consider the idea of an enamel finish in place o tile In the rcstrooms, bul the board agreed with Trustee Leo Welder, who said tile was necessary lo keep Ihe rest rooms clean. Aull also presented proposals for changing the second slory flooring from ceramic lile lo rubber and four outside alumi num doors to steel. The board apparently left action on suel cost culling changes up to the commillee composed of Wei der, chairman; Morris Sliat fuck and Fred Proclor. 2 Teachers Hired There were Ihree bids submit led, Ault reporled. Bolh Aul and Rick altended the meeting They informed the board tha a report on reducing the bi  School. 2. Gave final approval lo plans for Ihe Victoria High School band hall and cafeteria expansion. 3. Began preliminary study of plans for an estimated 000 contracl for parking facili- ties and covered walkways al the high school. Year's Guarantee -The action on the two-story, 11-classroom addition al Crain means, in effecl, lhal the board Henry picking a ripe tomato from his garden Monday morning, one he figures may be the first of the season In Vic toria Mrs. W. C. Johns reminding Children of the Con federacy members thai Ihe pic nic is planned for next Satur day has been postponed, and a meeting will be held at a.m. al Power Home instead Mrs. Esther Tolah getting set tied in her apartment Helen Sala, Ann Sala and Marl on Boesewelter on vacalion in New Orleans Sirs. Ra, Fimhel glad lo gel home from the hospital after a five week stay Joe Tasln glad to be oul in the May showers Mike Lucas finding a cheerfu greeting for the first working day of the week Leslie Monlag always ready wilh an explanation to suit the occasion Margie Ann Koencing re- porting Ihe I a lest news from Weslhoff R. D. Smith Jr taking time lo lell one of his lat esl jokes Jack Adcock checking on Ihe rainfall, espe elally where he was making hay .Mrs. Jodie Turek comment ing on the ease of parking'those smaller automobiles Mrs Robert BUIlags reminding Altar Society members of Our Lady of Lourdcs Parish of the fina meeting for the summer, al p.m. Wednesday, In Ihe church basement. 12 Cents Library Calls On County To Increase Contribution Mrs. B. D. Reynolds, the pres- book rentals and over-due fines nt to a minimum of 00 per year was taken under idvisernent Monday by the Vic full-time accredited librarian. This will require a salary of at least a year, Mrs. Puck- elt pointed out, but would have the effect of accrediting the Vic- tory library with all other ry organizations and groups. _ As part of Ihe new plan of li- a year to the support of brary operation, it was outlined -mij I1V4VW, 14H3 JJJ ent librarian, is anxious to re- tire as soon as possible after that "the Bronte Club will ap- point a governing board of ca- pable, interested citizens to op- erate the business of the library and to be a liaison between the Bronte Club and county and city officials. Regular semi-an- nual reports will be made to the contributing organizations by this board." It was noted that the library's present income is made up of from the county, from the city, in gifts Vlty, 111 gJIUi The court was advised that from individuals, and from for a total of The library expenditures from April, 1963, to April, 1964. includ- ed in salaries, in social security and withhold- ing taxes, in book pur- chases, for periodicals, for book binding, for library supplies, and in telephone bills for a lolal of In its proposed budget, Ihe li- brary would include the salary for an accredited librari- an, for an assistant libra- rian, for additional library help, for the purchase of new books, for utilities and telephone, for purchase of periodicals, for library supplies, for maid and jamlor service, and for rental of larger library quarters. However, it was pointed oul Marchers Halted by Tear Gas Wallace Talk Spurs Violence CAMBRIDGE, Md. s'ational Guardsmen Ihrew tear ;as grenades into a crowd of 250 o 300 integrationists in a dem- inslration which erupted Mon- ay night Cambridge that at least for the foresee- able future the library will con- tinue to be housed in the build- ing provided free of charge by (Sec LIBRARY, Page 7) Okay has purchased the building from the Don Kruegcr Con- struction Co. As in all school- building contracts, the school district is given a year's guar- antee against defects in work- manship and materials. The approval of the high school band hall and cafeteria expansion was given condition- ally two weeks ago when trus- tees decided lo Irim some 000 off the cost of the lowest contract at the bid opening. Bernhard Construction Co. submitted the low bid, but that was about more than Ihe board had antic- ipated. Truslees felt, however, that if the cost could be pared to about the plans could be approved. Cuts Made A committee consisting of representatives of the buildin; firm, school administration of- ficials and trustees [rimmed away since lhal time, bringing the final contract down to the neighborhood of 345. The biggest single saving in the project was the elimination of air-conditioning on the sec- ond floor of the band hall. Trustees decided to have con- duits installed at thai level, however, so that air-condition- ing can be quickly and easily added al a later dale if funds becnme available. Architect Chris DiStefano eslimaled lhat the paving walkway project at the high school will cost between and depending on wha type of construction trustees choose on the covered walk- ways. Paving Program The board discussed the poa sibility of asking bidders on thi projccl lo enler two or three alternate bids, bul then de decided to ask for a single LBJ Vows Increased Latin Aid WASHINGTON (AP) Prcsi dent Johnson, announcing (lie signing of 12 new loon pacts am commitments for 13 Lath American countries, Monday that the United Slates will double its assislance aclivi lies under the Alliance for Prog- ress. Johnson addressed the am Mssadors from the Alliance for Progress countries and the La :in representatives to the Organ zation of American Slates, aft er an hour-long' privale confer ence with them at (he While House. He told them the Uniled States las begun its own "all-out wa on poverty" because a jus country "cannot permit a das of forsaken in Ihe midsl of the forlunale." We are also marching for ward in our struggle lo elimi nate racial injustice to permi every man, of every race am color and belief, to share fully in our national Johnson said. "In Ihe same way we will joii (See SCHOOL, Page 7) Cuero Man Gets Fractured Skull Advocate Cucro Bureau CUERO A Cuero man suf- fered a fractured skull at 5 p.m and chain. Ervin Junker, 706 E. Main condition at to Burns Hospital Monday night, according to Ihe son, Chris Jun- ker. thrown into the ditch lhal runs parallel to Valley Slreel whei back and hit his father. Baker Hits Pool on Mail Poll Robert W. Baker, candldati or congressman-at-large in thi_ June 6 Democratic runoff with incumbent Joe Pool, cam paigned in Victoria Monday calling on Pool lo answer his own questionnaire. Baker who lead the field in he congressman-at-large raci n Ihe first Democratic primar; n Victoria County, said Poo lad abused his franking privi ego to send out a million ques ioimaires lo Texas voters dur ng the home-stretch of the firs campaign. This saddled with those hemisphere forces across who seek to vance their own democratic revolution. "We work because moralit' commands it, justice require! (See LBJ, Page 7) with a the taxpayer expense tha should have come out of cam paign funds, Baker said. Voting Record Hit He said the questionnaire be gan: "Should the U.S. stay i or get out of Ihe UN" and endec wilh Question 12: "Do you thin] questionnaires like (his one ar a good Queslion No. 11 asked whelhe Ihe person considered getting the mail pice I himself a Democrat Republican or Indepcndenl. "I think the incumbent shoulc answer his own questions, be ginning with parly idcnlifica said Baker, a forme slale senator from Harris Coun "Docs Pool regard himself a a Republican or a Democrat, o an independent? Yes or No "Il's plain he voles Repuhli can. Mayba he oulghl lo Jdcntif himself as a Democrat durin campaigns and a Republican Ih resl of Ihe lime. "Since he demands 'yes' o 'no' answers, I'd like him lo te the people of Texas how he feel about Ihe Unilcd Nations. He asked the question. He may want lo evade the answer, but I don't. I think the U.S. must stay in the United Notions lo carry on Ihe fight against world Communism. If we get out, Rus- sia will take over. 'If the incumbent doesn't (See BAKER, Page 7) after a speech in by Alabama Gov. Superintendent 4 Swap' Approved At Bloomington George O. Wallace. It was the second time the ntegralionists defied National Guard orders not to march. Vallace had left Cambridge be- ore the second demonstration in vhich the soldiers used Ihe tear ;as to break up the crowd. The demonstrators had as- sembled the second lime in ront of the Negro Elks' Hall where they had held a rally >rlor to Wallace's appearance. !uddenly, singing and chanling, Ihey locked their arms and walked toward Race Street, scene of racial turbulence last iiimmer. Met By Guardsmen Half a block from their appar- :nt destination, a National iriiard lieutenant, carrying a carbine and with knife in belt, novcd to meet them. As he did, about 25 hclmelcd troopers ivcaring gas masks and carry- ng bcyoneled rifles moved behind him. The demonstrators sal down n the street near the border oi ie 2nd (Negro) ward and sang. Soon a Military Police jeep X: raced up and Col. M. D. Tawes Justice of the Peace Alfred C. )aass said a preliminary au- oposy report showed death vas due to a heart attack. A verdict by the justice was Minding a final autopsy report confronted Gloria chairman of the Richardson, CarJbridge Nonviolent Action Committee. "You want them aU lo be ar- asked Tawes. Answered Yes Mrs. Richardson replied that she did. "We'll he glad lo accommo date you, said Tawes who turned lo an aide and said "All right, load them on your truck." An occasional rock or bottle flew over the scene. One stone hit Adrian Lee, a reporter frorr Ihe Philadelphia Bulletin. Lc didn't appear to be hurl serious Finally, Tawes ordered Ui_ Iroops to take tho demonstrators into custody. "Start with this he said pointing his swagger slick. Human Pyramid With that, (lie Negro demon slralor slrctchcd out on thi pavemenl and shoulcd, "Pile on top of me, pile on top of me.' Quickly a shouting, singing kicking human pyramid bcgar lo form in the middle of (he street. A hail of rocks and bottle: pelted Ihe soldiers. The troopers started to drag the demonstrators away, strlk ing with Ihe side of Iheir ope hands lo break the grips of thost who tried to cling to each other "All right, that's shouted Tawes. "We're going tc use tear gas on you." Ho ordered a guardsmei wearing a gas mask who had t tank strapped to his back tc move forward. "Go he ordered. From (See WALLACE, Page 7) McNamara Starts Viet Nam Review Today's Chuckle You're gelling over Ihe hill when most of your dreams are reruns. Port City Council Okays Railroad, Harbor Leases PORT LAVACA City coun- cil approved Monday night an ordinance granting Soulhern Pacific Co. a five-year lease for construction, mainlenance and operation of railroad track- across Commerce Street, MJ j --c.- granted as an emergency ac- base bid, and again seek re- tion to take effect immediately, 41.-. _______TI__ when Ihe dock will be used on a first-come, first- served basis, or to any vessel deleting the necessity of t he usual Iwo successive council readings. Construction Is lo be at an elevation so as nol lo impede or Interfere with pedestrian or vehicle traffic and the crossing will be in accordance with cus- tomary practice and agreement Monday when he was knocked wilh the Slate Highway De- lo the cement bottom of a drain- partmsnl, subject to all valid age ditch by a Iree trunk lhal existing laws, with existing sur- his son was atlempling to pull face drainage not substantial- from the ground with a truck Iy altered. Council also approved a one- year !ease in Ihe City Harbor 27U feet at rental per month, with a one-year renewal option al the same rental upon a 60-day Junker said his father was advance notice. The lean car- ries exclusive docking rights in so far as the city has right Ihe chain slipped off the top of lo grant Ihem for use In main- trie tree and the trunk sprang tainlng and docking ships, with exception of during threaten- THE WEATHER Mostly cloudy with a few widely scattered showers Tues- day morning. Partly cloudy Tuesday afternoon and Wednes- day. A little cooler Tuesday night. South to southeast winds 8-18 mph. Tuesday, becoming northeasterly 10-20 Wednesday. Low 70, high 89. South Central Texas: Clear lo partly cloudy Tuesday and Wednesday exccpl considerable cloudiness Tuesday morning wilh a few showers east and south, a little cooler Tuesday night. High Tuesday 84-94. Rainfall Monday: .u. Total rainfall for year: 7.31. Temperatures Monday: Low 73, high 83. Tides (Port Lavaca-Port O'Connor Lows al a.m. and p.m., highs at a.m. and p.m. Barometric pressure al sea level: 29.83. Sunset Tuesday sunrise Wednesday Infomtitlon biMd on t.__ 'rom Iht U.S. WMtiwr Burttu Victoria in distress, which may tie u; in an emergency. _In other actions the council Approved the recommcnda tion of tho Porks Board lo ap poinl Clayton Toalson to fi [he unexpired term of Georg :.xp: ade A. Rhoades, who resigned. Approved the Parks Boar proposed summer recreallona program based on a point ven lure of shared cosl with th school board of approximate! The proposal, presentee by the Rev. James Bailey an Bob Williams, needed counc approval because It exccedet the board's budget of 1 be spent without council aj proval. They announced would be presented lo Ih school board Thursday nigh for Its approval. Set May 25 as date of sal of the Austin Street- Highway 238 bond Issue. Passed a motion extendln the city meat Inspection ord nance enforcement, passed Oc U, 1963, for a Mai of 1 months, with an emergency clause Included. Approved a two-week perm to Kelly's Rides Camiva (See PORT; Pafe T) VERDICT DELAYED Bible Salesman Found Dead Here The body of a man, apparcnl- Ihe victim of a heart attack, found about p.m. Mon- ay lying on the side of Die oad in a deserted section of outh Victoria. The viclim was identified as ack M. Brown, 48, who resided t a rooming house at 308 S. Vavarro, and who worked out if San Antonio as a.biblo salcs- ind further investigation by the sheriff's department. Tho body was found near tho [iollom-Odem Streets intersec- tion close to a woods in an area that Is known as a "lovers Two employes of Houston Na- lural Gas Co, discovered the tody and notified authorities Daass said It appeared tho man had been dead since late Sun day night or early Monday morning. Tliero was somo blood arounc the ear, Bsass said, pointing ou it could have been caused by falling to the ground. McCabe-Carruth F u n e r a Home is handling arrangements SAIGON, South Viet Nami AP) U.S. Defense Secretary lobcrl S. McNamara promised .he Vietnamese people on his arrival in Saigon Tuesday thai he United Stales will provide 'whatever is required for how- ever long it is required" to defeat Communist forces threat- ening this Southeast Asian na- Couple Held After Bank Holdup MILFORD, Tex. (AP) Tho First National Bank of Mlfford was robbed of more than Monday and less lhan Iwo hours iater a man and woman were arrested In Grand Prairie in connection with the holdup. Bank officials sold a quiet, jcspectacled rcdhalred man en- ered (he small Ellfs Counly bank shorlly before 2 p.m., held a .45-calihcr automatic plsiol on Vice President J. C. Woodward and ordered him to fill a sack with money. The gunman Ihen escaped in a lale model car, driven by a .vomnn and drove lowards Dal- as, 50 miles lo the north. North Texas officers were slcrtcd and Grand Prairie po- lice spoiled a car driven by a red-haired woman fitting the description of the car and wom- an wanted in Iho robbery. Police arrested Ihe woman as she drove away from a Grand Prairie motel, approximately 10 miles west of Dallas. Then Tex- as Rangers, Ellis Counly depu- ties and Grand Prairie police swopped down on the mote cabin and arrested her male companion. Grand Prairie Police Chief B. D. Ware said ncilher the man nor woman offered any resist- ance and lhat .-15 automatic pistol were found in their possession. Grand Prairie Detective Ken neth Burr said the pair told officers they had staged Iho robbery. Bolh were laken lo Ellis Counly shorlly after their arrest. McNamara airived from Bonn under light security for what he described as "another of the regular meetings" he has been laving witli lop Americans anc Vietnamese here since the U.S military buildup began mor lhat Iwo years ago. "During my brief slay her this time, we will review Ih achieved along Ih lines of the program Intd out las McNnmara said. The defense secretary sold h would also review what furthc action may bo necessary lo pro vide economic and military slslance to win Ihe war again.il Iho Viet Cong. Maximum security was In 'orce al tho airport and along the highway into Saigon lo foil iny attempts on McNamara's ife. One plot was discovered Saturday night and three Viet Cong were arrested. Air force police checked all arrivals beloro MeNamar.i land- ed, and went over Iho VIP room TSTA Election Due Here Today Victoria public school teach- ers will hold a general faculty meeting Tuesday at p.m at the Baptist Temple lo cieci new officers In Iho local unli of the Texas Association. State Teachers 3 p.m. to enable tho teachers to attend the meeting. A panel of Harry !l progi ULhcff, ;ram, consisting director of pcr- sonnel and community rela- tions; Ignack) Diaz of the Tex- as Education Agency; anc Mrs. Bea Marth. fifth grade teacher at Hopkins School, wil discuss the dropout problem in the schools. Mrs. Mary Charles Baass is effective al re- lhc Out.g0ing president of t h e local TSTA unit. Post For Mullins Tied to Deal School Heads To Trade Jobs By BHUCE PATTON Advocate Staff Writer Hiring of a new school super- ntcndcnt was approved at a ailed meeting of Ihe Bloomlruj- on Independent School District board of trustees Monday night a I Ihe school. The move, however, Is depend- ent upon the acceptance of Claude B. Multins, current su- perintendent, In a swap ar- Paul J. Lewis, superlnlend- enl oi tho Garwood Independ- ml School District al Garwood n Colorado Counly since 1931, las been contacted by the ward, and indicated a desire or tho Bloomington posl. Mul- ins has indicated, that the change would be acceptable by ilm. Garwood Interview Last Saturday [our Bloom- ngton board members, Includ- ing Ronald R. Peck, presidenl, wcnl to Garwood to Interview Lewis, as well as to talk with members of the board of Iras- lees, business people, and others associated with Lewis. Accom- panying Peck were James K. Lewis, board secretary (who Is not rclaled to the superintend- ent In James E. Hlls- cher, and Gulhrlo Sklar. Mullins said Monday night lhat Lewis is the only person connected with the district with whom ho has had contact. How- ever, Mullins indicated lhat Lew- Is hnd told him that ho had con- tacted olhcr members of the board, and lhat they were In ac- disembarking from .his plane. McNamara was mel by U.S, Ambassador Henry Cabol Lodge, Gen. Maxwell D. Taylor, chair- man of Iho Joinl Chiefs of Staff, who arrived Monday; Gen. Paul D. llarklns, commander of U.S. forces in Viet Nam; and olher lop U.S. and Vietnamese officials. McNamara is paying his fifth visit to South Viet Nam since Ibc U.S. buildup, and his second in two months. cord with the proposed change. Mullins'said, also, Lhat he plans lo allcnd a meeting of Ihe Garwood board scheduled Tues- day nighl so that he may be in- terviewed, Two Object Two board members, Sklar and Alvln J. Wynn, objected to tho original mollon, made by Lewis and seconded by Hils- clier, lhat Lewis be offered only contract. After a in which Sklar praised the work of Mullins, the vole was unanimously In favor of a three-year contract. However member James K. Garner abstained from voting. Mullins' contract still has two years lo run, while the Gar- wood superintendent has three more years. The action Monday night fol- lowed an executive session last week, held afler the regular meeting, and iron which outsid- (Scc BOARD, Page 7) 183 LIVES LOST Plane Crashes Mount In Grim Five-Day Toll T7IF. ASSOCTATFn PRESS of air tragedies in Ihis country and abroad have claimed 183 lives over a five-day period, with 10 persons missing and be lievcd lost. Gravest of the disasters was tho crash of a U.S. military jet transport in the Philippines" ear- with a loss of 75 killing four crew members. Two others parachuted lo safety. Last Thursday, a Royal Air Force Volinnl bomber crashed in Lincolnshire, killing five men. The Philippines tragedy in- volved a U.S. C135 jet transport that crashed less than half a ly Monday lives, fn addition, three other mile from a runway at Clark 75 Air Base, after a flight from accidents during Iho day may have killed 16 others. A U.S. Navy patrol plane crashed at sea 20 miles off the Spanish coast. Wreckage was discovered during an air-sea search but none of the 10 per sons aboard was found. Thi crew of a Spanish fishing boal Classes will be dismissed at said they saw Ihe long-range P2V patrol plane strike the sen and burst Inlo flames, during maneuvers off the U.S. Polaris submarine base at Rota, Spain. Near Searle, Ala., a U.S. Air Force C119 carrying 43 student paratroopers lo a jump zone made a crash landing in a field, and burned. Two men were killed. In southern England, a Vulcan bomber, one of Ihe type equipped to carry Britain's H- bombs, went down In flames, Travis Air Force Base In Cali- fornia. Seventy-four of 83 mili- tary personnel aboard perished. In addition, a man was killed in a taxlcab thai was hit by the plane as it came down. Last Thursday, 44 persons _____ __............. died in the crash of a Pacific sons aboard was found The Airlines plane near Concord, Calif. A gun was found in the wreckage and investigators sought to determine if Ihe pilot had been shot at the controls by one of the passengers. On Friday, an Argentine Air Force courier plane, landing in dense fog near Lima, Peru, hit a high coastal sand dune. There were only 3 survivors among 49 pcrsoss aboard. Two crashes on Saturday look an additional seven lives. Near Cooperlon, OkU., a C1M military transport crashed and (SM PLANE, T)   

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