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Advocate Newspaper Archive: May 7, 1964 - Page 1

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Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - May 7, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 118th 363 TELEPHONE HI 5-MSI VICTORIA, TEXAS, THURSDAY, MAY 7, 19G4 Established IMS 32 Cents 2 Changes Defeated in Rights Bill Sponsors Win Major Test WASHINGTON (AP) The Senate, afler 43 days of talk, defeated Iwo amendmenls lo Che civil rights bill Wednesday night in a dramatic series ot roll calls that produced a ma- jor test of strength. Both amend- menls were opposed by the bill's sponsors. The first rejection was a change proposed by Sen. Thrus- lon B. Morton, D-Ky. It would have provided for jury (rials in all contempt of court cases aris- ing out of lhc bill. Tho final vole defeating it was 4645, which had (he effect of confirming an earlier roll call o n the same amend- ment. Two oilier parliamentary votes on il intervened. .Demos Solid The second amendment de- feated was offered by Sen. John Sherman Cooper, R-Ky. He wanted to require jury trials in criminal contempt proceedings stemming only from Ihe public accommodalions and fair em- employment sections of (he bill. It was crushed 74-19. Demo- crate senators lined up solidly against it except for Sens. Al- bert Gore, D-Tcnn.; Frank J. Lauschc, D-Ohio, and Lee Mel- calf, D-Monl. Under Cooper's proposal, con- tempt cases growing out of sec- tions of the bill dealing with vot- ing rights and integration ol public schools and public facili- tes such as parks and play- grounds, a jury trial could be provided al the discretion of the court but it would not be man- datory. South Ailacks Southern senators attackec Cooper's amendment even (hough they had supported Mor ton's. They called it discrimina lory in providing jury trials for some but not for others. The long freeze on action wa cracked under an informa agreement between the Senate' leadership and Southern foes o the measure. II pointed to a re alization of predictions by tin bill's sponsors that their owi jury trial proposal would even tually be accepled. A vote orf the leadership pro posal could be a long way or soon depending ou many parliamentary roadblock Ihe Southerners want to bring into play. No Votes Expected But no votes are ''expectec Thursday or Friday while erol senators accompany Presi dent Johnson on visils to thei states in the. Appalachia region. However, Johnson himself pu the Senate on notice that he i hoping for final passage of ih bill by the end of this month o early month. At his news conference. In said if Congress doesn't finisl ils major work, including thi civil rights bill, he would seri ously consider calling the Icgis lalors back after Ihe Rcpubl: can Nalional Convention in mic July and, if necessary, after th Democratic National Convenlio in mid-August. The defeated amendment was offered by Sen. Thruston B. Mor- ton, R-Ky., It would have pro vided for jury trials in all con- tempt of court cases arising out of the civil rights bill. Tiiis was the confusing scries of voles: Senate first rejecled the amendment 45-45. Southerners fSce CHANGES, Page 8A) LBJ Sees Possibility Of Recalling Congress PART OF EXHIBIT This accurate reproduction of the CSS Alabama is part of the Civil War Centennial Ex- hibit to be seen at various times this month at the McNamara-O'Connor Fine Arts Museum. The exhibit in- cludes various weapons, records, AT MUSEUM photographs, and other Hems concern- ing the Civil War. The museum will open from 3 to 5 p.m. Friday, when visitors will have their last oppor- tunity to see the Buck Schiwctz paintings Photo) on display. (Advocate Civil War Items To Be Displayed The Civil War Ccnlcnnial Ex- liibit al McNamara-O'Connor Historical Fine Arts Museum will be on display from 3 to 5 xm. Friday as well as at var- ous times during the remainder of the month. The exhibit was arranged by Mrs. Earl Cliburn, Mrs. Ben T. Jordan, president of the Vic- loria County Historical Survey Committee, said. To be displayed for Ihe last lime Friday will be the Buck Schiwctz paintings, Mrs. Jor- dan said. The art -works feature various scenes of South Texas, including the Courthouse. Victoria County Included in the Civil war ex- hibit arc a series of documents, some reproductions, a rifle anc some pistols of Ihe Civil War era, some confederale cur- rency, a collection of photo- graphs, a copy of a newspaper telling of the assassination ol President Lincoln, and various other ilems. Mrs. Jordan said Hie Civi War exhibit will be shown from 3 lo 5 p.m. on the first, seconc and fourth Sundays of the mouth, and from 10 a.m. until noon each Wednesday. Members of the William 'p. Rogers Chapter, of the Daugh ters of the Confederacy will b invited lo hold their May 1 meeting al (he museum to giv members a better chance to in spcct the various ilems on dis play, Mrs. Jordan said. Catholic Order Offers To Run Cuero Hospital Farmer May Cut Main Phone Line PALESTINE, Tex, rate telephone subscribe hrealened Wednesday to cu he Texas Telephone and Tele graph Company's main under iround cable near Elkharl. Juan M. Macias, 54, who live- on a 65-acre farm five mile west ot Elkhart along Stat Highway 294 gave the compan 48 hours to move the line off his farm. Macias dug a hole down t Former Victorian, Carl Hoop- er, sending greetings from his new post as edilor of Ihc Tex- as Cily Sun Rudy Mnloeha doing his best lo inspire some assistance in his cleaning chores Charlotte Kcnell ad- milling that its nice lo have a talented mother R. K. Tur- pen doing his good deed for the day Jlollan, Al Turner and John greeting friends, and conlinuing their sidewalk di s- cussion Bertha Griffith ex- plaining that there are times a person needs sympathy I.. M. Bcrnhard sharing h i s birthday cake wilh friends Robert Martinez having d i f- ficully in mccling the s am c illy icdul schedule his wife was keeping Gilbert Prlldiard giving some advice to a friend about ._. waiting for the right opporluni-lparl ly Harry Rivers unable (o locale his early morning friends for coffee Bob Livin keeping a busy schedule Sirs. J. D. Weaver In t from Fleming PraJrie Collum In charge of tickets for the annual Lillian Cain Cox Dance Revue, and selling t h c tickets for adults and 75 cents (or children. By BEN availability of Hill-Eurlon Advocate Cucio funds that could pos- CUERO Officials of be made available for Sisters of the Incarnate projecl. and Blessed Sacramenl Wednesday nighl told the Cuero area hospital steering committee thai Ihe order would be interested in operating a new hospital here but is in no to this point, the steering committee is considering recommending that a hospital dis-Iriel be created aud a bond election called lo help pay for (he hospital. Olher funds would to build its from Ihe Hill-Burlon Plans for a 60-bed in proportion to the num- that at one time were of beds this area would considered by the Sisters were made available to Ihc for under the government program. Sazarsky spoke of the Meeting with the of Ihe Sislers donat- were Mother Mary Rose, their properly lhal borders er general of the order from Victoria; Sister M. for the new hospital sile in relurn for a lease administrator of Burns operate the inslilution. pital of Cuero; the Rev. John J. Sazarsky, director of Sazarsky, who pointed out that this was only his "own and health for the said if this plan was of San Antonio, and other then Ihe Sisters living ters of the would already be Before the plan was He said the new hos- doned, the order bad hoped could be connected lo the build Ihe new hospital on one, which could possibly erly that faces Esplanade ORDER, Page 8A) jo ins llic site of pital. In answer to a question SURVEl Clifton Weber, Sister Xaveria said she did not believe a 50-hcd hospital and adjoining Sch bed nursing home would adequate for the commumly's Favor Although the commille made no recommendations on Ihc size of Ihe proposed hospital, a 50-bed slruclure has received considerable discussion by the committee. This was Ihc size hospital recommended by a firm that had been cm-ployed earlier by Cuero Frank Hubert, chief consultant of Ihc I.eam of cduca-lors which finished a survey Wednesday of the Victoria Public School system, said the panel's general impression of (he system was "quite favor- pital foundation to study "There are some A large part of the 50-bed recommendation was based said, "where outstanding instructional programs are offered." of the 15 specialists in Weather areas of education will submit a formal report to Hu- Expires The combined reports, expected lo run over 100 pages, By THE ASSOCIATED be sent to School Supt. Threatening skies and 0. Chandler In about Iwo tered showers covered a Hubert said. part of north and east panel studied a wide of Texas Thursday and a of areas, including busi- Iparl of (he stale went education, vocaliona! serv- tornado mathematics, English, The alert expired with social studies, music, turbulent weather school plant fa- Showers, expected to conlinue through Thursday, fell from and others. Represented on the panel were edu- Antonio to Wichita Falls from Corpus Chrlstl, ;from Abilene lo the Texas Education Maximum University of Texas, down generally from of Houston, Texas day's highs ranged from 101 and Texas Ail. Presidio to 76 at panel opened Ils studies Dallas, Waco and morning, and finished Ihc line, backed his tractor up hill to the site, lied a log chair around the telephone cable an linked it to the tractor. Th tractor was there late Wedne. day awaiting further develo] meats. Protest Rale Hike The incident was an ou growth of a dispute betwee hundreds of rural subscriber and Texas Telephone Tel graph. Macias was one of mor than who had protested 33K per cent rate increase im posed Feb. 1. Like others h had asked that his telephone b removed after April 1 unless th rale increase was rescinded. The company held fast, say ing the increase was nccessar And Macias kept using his tele phone although he refused t pay the new rale. He paid til per month, and th company kept billing him fo Lhc difference. Cut Privalc Line On April 24, Macias said li received notice that his scrvic would be cut off April 27 unlcs Ihe bill was paid. He later wen lo Elkharl and paid all charge against him, he said. He sai he thought he was paid up unl May 20. A company rcpresenta live cut his private line Tuc: day. Macias countered by o: dcring (he main line taken from his farm. "They told me that if I cu the line, I'd cut off service all way lo Macias i. "But I told them if you can'l give me service, I can't help you." J.S. Stand Cuha Re-Stated Aerial Watch Will Coniimic WASHINGTON tAP) The Jpited Slates slated emphatical- Wednesday that surveillance lights over Cuba will continue, nslslcd its economic boycott ol he Castro regime is effective net called on ils European al ies to support thai policy. Secretary of Defense Robcri McN'amara said the over- lights of Cuba would continue egarriless of whether the Sovlc Union turns over to the Cubans Is antiaircraft missile instnlla Jons when Soviet Iroops ore vithdrawn. And President Johnson toll lis news conference on the soutl awn of the While House tha Vmcrica's policy of cconomi' solation of Cuba "is being of leclivc." Communism Check The. United States, he said, L ;oing to conlinue Ihc policy "in he hope of prevenling th spread of Castro (Cuban Prim Minister Fidel Castro) comnui nism lo Ihe rest of the hcmi sphere." This nation will continue to ir sist and urge that allied govern menls join In making il cffcc live, he said, although that dec sion is up to them. Britain has recently sol buses lo Cuba and France so! 20 locomotives, both over stron U.S. objections that this would strengthen Cuba's faltering economy. Agreement Denied Johnson was also asked if re- ports are true that there was an agreement with the Soviet Un- ion approving the U.S. surveil- lance flights over Cuba. Johnson said he was "not fami- liar" with any such agreement. Soviet Premier Khrushchev also has denied iLs existence. The United Slales' posilion lias been that in the absence of on-silo inspection, the over- flights are necessary to guard against reinlroduclion of Sovlel missiles such as those forced out of Cuba in October Public Kecoril The newsman who questioned Johnson said the Slate Depart- ment had indicated in the past thai there was a U.S.-So- Texas GOP Keynoter AUSTIN Wilk- inson, Republican nominee for the U. S. Senate In Oklahoma and former Okla- homa University fool ball roiirh for 17 years, will he the keynote .speaker nl'dic Texas GOP stale cunvi-ntlun In Dallas June 1C, Stale Chuirman Peter O'Doimcll said Wednesday. Wilkinson, whose foothull teams at OU w o n three college national champion- ships anil liail five perfect seasons, resigned In Janu- ary of this year lo make Iho Senate race. He won an easy victory In Hie primary. WASHINGTON (AP) Presi- Icnt Johnson raised the possi- bility Wednesday he might call Speedy Action Urged On Rights Bill, Others Congress back to Washington if  locks. Manor Drive, 700, 800, 90C jnd 1000 blocks. North Levi, all of Iho 2400 Johnson's feelings about holding Congress in scs- ion should Ihcy run on a little it wilh Uie civil rights bill." Tho President replied that he oped Congress would finish vilh Ihe civil rights bill at least y early June, "and then we can el on wilh our food stamp plan n Uie Senate, our poverty bill, ur Appalachia bill, and our ncdical aid bill." Ho also mentioned a hope for irompt action on a bill to raise eilcral pay. Extra Session "Tho people's business must come Johnson declared vilh a flat emphasis, "and I hink Uiat Uie people of this country arc entitled to have a on these important meas- ires. 1 am going to ask the Con- jress lo vote them up or down." Asked more dlreclly If he was conlcmplallng an exlra session of Congress. Johnson said he was not anticipating what Con- gress will do at the moment. He expressed hope the law- makers would pass Uie bills he has asked of them, but if they don't "I will seriously consider calling Uiem back to vote them down or up. I will cross thai bridge when I get lo it." Families Attend Tile news conference was ex- traordinary in Hint it Included vives FEDERAL PLAN AuHln tiLueau AUSTIN The Victoria area on Ihc Slale hospital services may has received a rating of "95.-1 per cent of bod needs met" in the newly revised State Plan for hospital construction under the Federal Hill-Burton Act. This means that, wilh Ihe com- ilelion of the 52-bed addition to le Tar Hospital, the area hos- plain at sea Wednesday. The P'ta' facilities arc adequate and carrier's hull was damaged nrca nns a "D" priority, the next to lowest, lo receive Hill- Burlon funds in fiscal 1965. The priorities range from "A" (0 lo 39 per cent of bed needs mel) to- "E" (100 per The Victoria area has 317 gen- eral hospital beds conforming lo Hill-Burlon standards, with The ships collided al R a.m. in only 15 beds programmed for and highly functional. Perhaps moderate seas. They were lak- future needs. a most serious shortcomingilng part in antisubmarine war-! No federal grant was involved could find was a lack of fare operations. One airplanclin the De Tar Memorial addi- storagc space, but It is nothing aboard the carrier was dam- lion now under conslruction. aged. Nursing home facillllcs in the Victoria area also were report- ed as adequate. The new Slalc Plan will go lo Ihc 12-mcmbcr State Advisory Hospital Council and Ihe State Board of Health for approve! in June, and then will be forward- lhal cannot be corrected at a very low cost." Hubert said that local ar-_____ rangcmcnls were "very com- slow speed for Norfolk. She was Reed, and praised Ted assistant principal Victoria High School and chair (See SYSTEM, Page Accompanied by the doslroyer Gearing, the Decatur headed at expected to arrive here Thin-s- al day at a.m. The fleet !fig B. Shakori sailed from Norfolk to escort the Decatur into port. id Ihe north half of the reporters, as well as their hundreds of (hem. Windsor, 3600, 3700 'and reporters, Uicro wore ocks. Garrcll, 3600 nnd 3700 persons present. Johnson greeted his young Holly, 3200 and 3500 in a folksy, favorite-un- North Cameron, 3200, sort of way, and Ihe children id 3500 on their best behavior. Arroyo, 3200 nnd 3300 made hardly a noise until Curb and gutter and the grown-up talk was over to be installed in all it was lime lo go after the and owners of and punch. Then their operly will be assessed and broadcast ?r front foot in a television and filled om the normal air. ivipg Discounted Normally council wails spent a large parl of is pclilioncd by 75 per cent Ihe residents before lime reeling off statistics nboul how well off he said the g in these programs, but is, and how il can slay imintetrallon Initialed -ogram. City Manager thai connection, and other- ee told council Monday he said: S that Ihc work laid out He docs nol Ihink Gov. le ordinance will 0. Wallace of Alabama, iving in at least three urens, iminaling the last ot stalcs-righl who opposes the administration's civil rights pro- had done so well In either In addition, Lee said, administration's civil rights dminislralion feels that had done so well in lelion of paving in these the Wisconsin or Indiana ill cut down on the He said ho wouldn't mg rmige maintenance Ihe Wallace vole amount- i Ihe areas involved. Property owners will to "any overwhelming endorsement." illcd prior to Ihe public Secretary of Defense Rob- ig on Ihe project, which S. McNamara will leave Fri- chcdiiled nt 5 p.m. May for muliial defense lalks in Properly owners who Germany. He will go on ejections lo the proposed Bonn to Saigon, lo take ig will have an opportunity look al Uie situation in (Sec PAVING, I'ngc Viet Nam. KmploymcnL ,1. Wilh profits and wages and all rising strongly, Johnson asked business to hold the ital line or even cut prices, and has asked labor lo hold wage increases within the of productivity Increases. "If they do the Prcsi-denl said, "the country can d to the U.S. Surgeon General n Washington. There It will to the heights of full employment and to full use of our great productive potential. ic slate plans of the other reporter, taking note of tales lo form the basis for great physical activ- llocation of almost 51 LBJ, Page M) i federal Hill-Burton funds ir 'cvas for fiscal 1965. Texas, which has led all WEATHER n Ihc federal allocations In re-cnl years, was given cloudy with a few M for fiscal and scattered light showers 93 the previous year. The nnd Friday, South to nt Hilf-Burlon Act expires winds at 15 lo 25 nne 30, bul Congress is Expeclcd Thursday (em- d to give it a five-year High 85, low 75. I starling July Central Texas: Cloudy The U.S. Bureau of the Budget vlll study the Slalc Plan warm Thursday through Friday with widely scattered ach of the 50 states and High Thursday In 80s mmcnd allocations to slales 66-96 south. ic basis of need, W e d n csday: rowth, per capiin Income 83, low 76. fie ability of the (Port Lavaca-Port lates to do their own Lows at in. and p.m. Highs at Texas will not know p.m. Thursday and ugusl what its share of the Illl-Burlon funds are. When Friday. Barometric pressure at sea In W mount is known, Iho Scplom-icr agenda of Ihc State hoard 1 Health will list all appllca-ons for Hlll-Diirton projects Sunsel Thursday: Sunrise Friday: TIili Information based on diU t r o m the U.S. Weathtr Bureau (See HOSPITAL, Page Ofllce. (See Weather Klitwberc. LAI   

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