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Advocate: Saturday, May 2, 1964 - Page 1

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - May 2, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 118th 358 TELEPHONE HI f.1451 VICTORIA, TEXAS, SATURDAY, MAY 2, 1964 Established IMS 18 Cents Winds, Rain Lash Temple; 20 Injured School Children Escape As Cafeteria Collapses By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Tornadic winds, accompanied by torrential rain and some hail lashed Temple, in Central Texas, Friday with heavy damage and at least 20 persons injured, none critically. Police Chief A. C. Berry made the estimate on in- jured. There was no official damage estimate late Friday night, but one witness guessed" it at The storm tore through a 30- ock-wide strip of Ihe Central exas hospital and railroad cen- U.S. Flights Blasted Khrushchev MOSCOW (AP) -Premier Khrushchev warned Friday con- tinued U.S. intelligence flights over Cuba could have disastrous consequences. As he issued his May Day threat at a gala Kremlin recep- lion, Cuba's Prime Minister Fi- del Caslro told a huge crowd in Havana that if pressure In world forums didn't stop the flights, "Cuba will repel Ihat aggression wilh arms." The two Red leaders evident- ly coordinated their threats to pul new pressure on the United States. Washington stood firm. Flights Necessary The Slate Department, alter hearing the threats from Mos- cow and Havana, repeated President Johnson's statement thai Ihe flights were necessary for U.S. security and would con- tinue. Khrushchev denounced con- tinuation of Ihe flights as the climax of Moscow's May Day celebrations. "This will be a disaster, first and foremost, for those who carry through a policy of pro- vocations and aggressions against Khrushchev de- clared at Kremlin reception tor May Day guests. Playing Wilh Fire He suggested that Americans were playing with fire. Khrushchev spoke at a Krem- lin reception for Ihe guests he had al the May Day parade, which saw the Soviet Union pul its rocket arsenal on display. Included was a new tacliea! rocket. In Washington, State Depart- ment press officer Richard J Phillips restated, in the lace of Khrushchev's warning, the American policy of continuing the flights. Featured Guest Algerian President Ahmed Ben Bella was the (eaturcc guest at Ihe May Day paradi in Moscow and the Kremlin re ception. Last year, Castro wa the featured guest. The slim Algerian, 47, re cetyed even more attention than had been accorded Ihe Cuban Like Castro, Ben Bella wa made a Hero of the Soviet Un ion. But he also gol a separat. honor, a Lenin Peace Prize. Mrs. Walker Carpenter out o the hospital and recupcratin Winston Zirjncks reportin an interesting meeting at I h Synod of the United Luthera Church in San Antonio Nancy Morrow reminding are high school students of Ihe Vic toria College Baptist Studen Union social honorng them i City Park at p.m. Tues day Mrs. Sam Bailey cal ing on Trail Theater cnlhus asts to produce for the n e x production two wooden rockin horses, the old fashioned kin Jake Pena admitting lha riding lawn mowers make large lawns more enjoyable Bennle Spies wondering wh the rains always seem to h somewhere else Wallac Btrnhard waiting palienlly fo friends lo spell his name co rectly especially when he tcl a good Pizza story GUI; Sklar of Placedo having Jh farming problems J o h Dodsoa out early to fight th new insects that have Infiltra ed his cotton patch W. I McManli, adjutant of the VFW reminding members of Om an nvul barbecue Sunday at Akv Field, with chow lime un til p.m. and dancing at p.m. lo the music of Herb Kloc sel and his orchestra 2n Harold Marshall c Andrew AFB, Washington D.C borne for a 10 day leave. The Temple Daily Telegram escribed the storm as a "tor- ado that never did touch the and said the boiling ouds appeared lo reach for ie-earth but never quite make Funnels Seen "Dozens of persons reported eeing a one newsman aid. "I think we just missed a ajor disaster." All Ihe Temple schools were amaged, but Ihe Emerson Elc- icntary School on the city's asl side suffered mosl. A large afeteria's 90-foot long wall was own in at the school and the oof collapsed. A few children uffered only minor injuries. The Emerson principal had ned the children in the school's allways, thus preventing seri- us injuries aiid possible deaths, son after the storm, all Tcm- le schools were dismissed for ie day. Houses Demolished Power and telephone poles rere lopplcd, Irecs blown oul f (he ground, and plate glass indows in the downtown busi- ess districl were shattered houses in the Negro see- on, one occupied by Ihree per ons, were demolished. The sec- nd house was vacant. The 10- nd 12-year old sons of William razell were injured in the oc- upied house. They were among 'x persons hospitalized. About six transport trucks anc ne railroad boxcar were over urned. Several electrical fires roke out, keeping firemen be ind on calls for several hours )nly one of the (ires did ap reciable damage, that to a Irive-in restaurant. Power Hailed About 300 telephones v   DALLAS, Tex. (AP) Texas Republicans are oxpecled to onfirm nt the ballot box Satur- !ny their leaders' support of ion. Barry Goldwalor lor Ihe ircsidenlial nomination. Tho poll is a nationally slgnif- eant highlight of Ihe state's big wliltail day when belli major nrtlcs nominale (or local and talc offices. The GOP presidential poll is lot binding on delegates lo the nominating convention. It is not even advisory to the 60 del- egates who will be selected at slale convention June 16. The poll was designed frank- y to cmphashc (lie stale GOP's ivcrwhelming support of Iho conservative senator Irom Ari- zona and perhaps influence del egalcs and voters in other states. The olhers on tho York Gov. Nelson A. Rockefel cr, Maine Sen. Margaret Chase Smith and former Minnesota !ov. Hurold E. not campaign except for an nflor- nooi] Stasscn spent in Dallas. Rockefeller asked thai his name be removed from the bal- lol and was told he made Ihe request too late. Several other potential nominees were suc- cessful in keeping off the ballot However, write-in votes are per- mitted. Both major parties hold their primaries al Ihe same lime. Gov. John Connally faces for the second time in Iwo years the Midget Train To Begin Runs The Suburban Kiwanls Spe cial will roll at 1 p.m. Satur- day in nfverslde Park. Wilh club members at Ihe throttle, the miniature train wil carry its first load of paying, customers along the half-mile track which loops around Vic Children's Zoo and makes a scenic run along the Quad alupe River. Kiwanis, who installed th train In cooperation with City Parks and Recreation Commis sion, will pay Ihe city 20 pc cent of its net revenue until Its indebtedness for the train is re tired. After thai lime, Ihe eilj will receive 30 per cent of the revenue. Interest. High In DeWitt Voting Toda) riilvocnLo Cucrn Hurcau of the most li cresting Democratic prlmaric icld in DeWIH County In number of years Is slated Sa. irday when voters cast ballot n eight local and area races Tho DeWitt Counly slicrift which has Ihrra cand laics, has drawn most intcres TJie post Is being sought b he incumbent, Ray Markov iky; n former Yoakum polic chief, Norvan (Cutter) Dletz and Raleigh Blackwell. The office that lias draw .he largest number of cane dates Is county comiiilssiono o( Precinct 3, which Is I h Yorkio'ivn-Nordheim area. Cm ilidatcs arc Gilbert Koopmnni Carlton Mueller, H. R. Mu schtcr nnd Henry Wclic. The incumbent, Joe Grns, not a candidate (or re-oicctioi Two men arc seeking II job of counly commlsslonc tor Precinct 1. They are Dav (See DeWITT, Poge 6) RODEO WONDERMENT Fledging Cowboy Cleveland Cannan, 5, son of Rodeo Judge and Mrs. Jam Cannan of Alvin, was one of the most avid spectators at the first performance of the Victoria Horseman's Club Rodeo Thursday evening in City Park arena. A near capacity crowd of about saw the first performance. The rodeo ends with the 8 p.m. performance Saturday. (Advocate Photo) THE WEATHER Partly cloudy and conlinuct warm Saturday through Sun day. Mostly southerly daytime winds at 10 to 20 m.p.h, Ex peeled Saturday temperatures High S2, low 74. South Central Texas; Parti; cloudy and warm Snlurda: through Sunday. Chance of Iso lated Ihunciersnowcrs cast por tion Saturday afternoon am evening. High Saturday M 0 except ffl-100 southwest portion Temperatures Friday: 90, low 72, Higr Precipitation Friday: .05. To Inl this year lo date 7.17 inches Tides (Port Lavaca-Port 0 Connor High at 10 a.m Saturday, Low at a.m. Sun day, Barometric pressure at sc level; 29.67. Sunset Saturday: Sun rise Sunday: Thli Information based on riat from tho U.S. Weather Burea Vlclorln Office, (See WfiUicr cm ormldablo Don Yarborough in is bid for a second term. Con ally won the Democratic noml nlion over Yarborough by 2U, SO voles of 1.1 million casl li Comyilly has cnmpiiignci cry little, snying he tires cas nflor recovering from (Sec POLL, Page irm Con vcn lions In Aflcruoou By HOY filllMES Advocate Slnlt Writer What started ofl as a run-ot- ic-mill Democratic primary lection in Victoria County has rnduiilly built up in interest itil it Is entirely possible that alurday's total vole may jllpso Iho county's previous ll-time voting record set in tho ace for president in 1960. A total of votes were ccorded in Victoria Counly in no. presidential election of {Sco Where, To Vole ox, 'ilh for tho Kennedy- olmson Democratic ticket and ,614 (or the Nixon-Lodgo He- ublican llckcl. Tho Republican primary clec- Ion Saturday may also c o n- notably loward swelling he total vote. The GOP's pres- [icntial preferential referendum ind a high degree of partisan- hip In the four-man rare for he Republican nomination to the U. S. Senate arc calculated o bring oul n veto that will far exceed any over recorded In he parly's primary elections in Victoria County. I'olls Open 8 Polling places in both pri- maries will open at 8 a.m. and will remain open nnlll 7 p.m. Victoria County may Have as many as more qualified voters this year than ever be- fore, A lolal of J2.802 poll tax receipts were issued for voting n the 1901 elections, in addition lo exemption certificates in the city of Victoria, making B combined total of In addition there will bo tho arge number of exempted vot- ers in rural areas of the county who require no certificates, and all together the potential voting strenglh may go beyond Itix-orcl In irwo Tho record vole in a Demo- cratic primary elecllon lip to now was In 1060, when a total of ballots In Victoria County were recorded In the race tor Iho governor's nomin- allon between Cov. Price Dan- iel and Jack Cox. A determined and well-orga- nized campaign has been staged during the closing days of the campaign lo get out the vote In support of a second term for Qov. John B. Connolly, and these efforts are expected lo show n considerable effect in the final totals. The Connally people also have directed their attention (Sec Page B) Runaway Trailer Kills Cuero Rodeo Promoter Advocalc Curro CUEKO Eddie Cameron, 57-year-old rodeo cowboy whose skill had carried him all the way (o Madison Square Garden in New York Clly, died in a local hospital Friday. Cameron was fatally injured earlier In the day when he was helping move a trailer that had been stuck in sand at the rodeo arcnn on the 77 Ranch near Cuero. Cameron, who had promoted a rodeo on the ranch last week, was crushed by the trail- er nnd thrown against a near- by post when Ihe Irailcr hit a post and went out of control. lie had traveled extensive- ly in earlier years as a rodeo contestant. The body lies in state nt Registration Days Extended Registration of students cur- rently attending St. Joseph has been extended through Monday, Brother William Callahan, prin- cipal, said Friday. flogislrallon had been sched- uled for Thursday and Friday only. Brother Callahan said regis- tration of students during the two-day period had been rela- tively light, but declined to give any figures. He said the lotal figure would bo available Mon day. Finch Funeral Home in Nixon. Graveside services will be conducted at 2 p.m. Sunday at Normanje near Bryan. Survivors are the wife, Mrs. Lee Cameron of Bryan; the mother, Mrs. Donna Cameron of Houston, and three sisters, Mrs. Ray Markowsky of Cuero and Mrs. Jcs.se Peyton and Mrs. Arvc! Bean of Houston. Cameron was preceded in death by his father and a brother. The hoar! of Iho beats in Ktnneth L. Dixon's THE CHANGING SCENE on exclusive column for readers of The Victoria Advocate Monday on Editorial Page I   

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