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Advocate Newspaper Archive: April 25, 1964 - Page 1

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Publication: Advocate

Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - April 25, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 118th 351 TELEPHONE HI 5-1451 VICTORIA, TEXAS, SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 1964 Estafcllstltd 1MB 63 Military Installations Given Axe Savings Cited By McNamara WASHINGTON CAP) Secre- tary of Defense Robert S. Mc- Namara announced Friday 63 closings, reductions and consoli- dations of military installations and activities at an estimated ultimate saving of million annually. Most of the individual actions involved relatively minor oper- ations including some unused Florida seaplane bases and they will be carried out over a 314-year period to reduce the economic impact on localities and personnel. Protest But some of them were im- portant enough to bring prompt protest from members of Con- gress. None of the 11 government WHOLE COMMUNITY operated naval shipyards and no major Army, Air Force or Navy bases were involved in the announcement but to turn of some of them may come in six to nine months. When completed, the Penta- gon said, Friday's actions will eliminate civilian jobs and military assignments about in the United Slates and overseas. Those affect- ed domestically will be largely civilians, those overseas large- ly military personnel. Savings Cited The Defense Department esti- mated that this latest step will combine with earlier ones in a three-year program of reduction and realignment of facilities and operations to bring an ultimate over-all annual saving of million a year in operating costs and the elimination of el vilian jobs and mililary assign ments. An added ovet-all resuli, the Pentagon said, will be the re lease of acres of land foi sale or nondcfense use by the government. And 61 indusiria plants will have been madi available for sale. All career workers whose jobs are eliminated will be offered other spots and moving expens- es will be paid for employes who must pull up stakes to take another job elsewhere in a de- fense installation, the Pentagon said. Retaining Planned In order to assure widest op- portunity for new jobs, dis- placed workers will be retrained for new skills at government ex- pense, the announcement added. All the closings, reductions and consolidations will be car- ried out without basic impair- ment of the nation's mili- tary might, McNamara said. Fifty-five of the action's an- nounced Friday affect facilities and operations in the United Slates at ultimate annual savings of million. Eight others will involve un- specified overseas bases and op- erations in four countries at (See MILITARY, Page 3) 12 Cents Area Retardation Project Lauded by AMA President By TOM E. KITE Advocate Staff Writer Community concern and lead- ership, such as has been shown 'iy leaders of the Area Project m Retardation, have been esponsible for bringing to the American community the serv- ces it needs and a r- icularly medical Edward R, Annis told project fficers and guests at a lunch- :on here Friday. Dr. Annis, a Miami, Fla., iurgeon, is president of both he American Medical Assoeia- ion and the World Medical As- ociation. This community concern is he thing which has placed far ahead in providing general medical care, he told several hundred listeners. Relating that he recently ipenl 23 days touring Europe, )r. Annis said that he and oth- er Americans have discovered hat Europe has doctors and facilities comparable to a n y- thing in they are concentrated in a few centers and not generally available to the people. While American communities build their own hospitals either through private enterprise or civic cooperation, hospitals in Europe are built only when and where some government agency designates, Dr. Annis said. "That is the reason one new hospital has been built in Bri- tain in the last 17 years, while at the same time we have built tiie national president said. Going a step farther, he said that communication between the medical profession and the peo- ple through the press and other media is vital. Through this communication "knowledge and science made understand- able to a cooperative people" desire and the ability of small American communities to take advantage of medical ad- vancements is marie possible, he asserted. Moving into the field of men- tal health with which the area project is more deeply e o n- cerned, Dr. Annis said that it is an area which far too few people "even in my own profes- sion" understand. Great advances have been made in treating mental illness, he said, and greater ones can be made as the AMA works in close cooperation with the pro- fessional associations of psychi- atrists in training genera] practitioners "to be alert to the early symptoms" of mental ill- ,ess. Just as most common phys- ical ailments are now treated "at home, so must be the men lal ailments" in the future, Dr. Annis said. Too frequently the mentally ill person sent "far of] to some institution" receives (See. PROJECT. Page 3) Swirl Over Wide Area, Hit Two Spots U.S. Flights Over Cuba Data Sorties Said Viola lion Now Home For Sisters Our Lady of Victory Cath- olic Church, the city's new- est Catholic Church and the only one with a parochial school, will dedicate Us new convent Sunday The two-s tor y, structure will house the sis- ters who teach at the school. The seven Sisters who teach (here have been rent- ing a house near the school. The Rl. Rev. Msgr. F. O. Beck will bless the convent and give a brief address in ceremonies beginning at 3 p.m. An open house will be lielil after tbe ceremony, with members of the church Altar Society serving as hostesses The Rev. E. A. Hermes is pastor of the church and superintendent of the school. Connally Cites State Progress By TUli ASSOCIATED PRESS Gov. John Connally went on statewide television Friday to say he is proud of the "substan- tial success" of his 15 months in office and to ask for another two years as governor. In a speech delivered over 21 Texas television stations, Connally said he spoke "with pride" of "the substantial suc- cess of our program in progress achieved in the relatively short, span of 15 months that I have been privileged to be your gov- ernor." Connally did not mention any of his opponents in the demo- cratic primary. Don Yarborough of Houston, Barber Shoppers Tuned For Harmony Parade j The Seventh Annual. Parade of Harmony will begin at 8 p.m. Saturday at St. Mary's Hall, with outstanding barber shop quartets due from Victoria, San Antonio and Houston. The evening of entertainment is being sponsored by the Vic- A. B. Linnin declaring war on the local blackbirds that are in- vading his grain field Ger- ald Taylor staying extra busy, even in his spare time Mrs. Mary Tiliilelti inviting the public to attend a collection of pictures, relics and documents on the War Between the Stales at the Power Home, 208 E. Church, on Sunday from 2 to E p.m. Beta Sigma Phi, Kap- per Omicron Chapter members staging a bake sale today be- ginning at 9 a.m. at Sear's Roe- buck Mrs, J. II. Alkck ,Ir reminding club women and in- terested people of the attic auc- Ofi'icer Confirms Oswald Report DALLAS Police Lt. Jack Revill confirmed Fri- day he reported to his superiors on Nov. 22 thai an FBI agent has said of Lee Harvey Oswald: 'We knew he was capable of ssassinating the President." Revill said he heard the com- ,ent from FBI special agent ames (Joe) Hosty in the Dallas olice Department shortly after resident John F. Kennedy had cen assassinated and Oswald ad been taken into custody. Another police officer was resent when the remark was nade, Revill toid the Associated ress in a telephone call from acramenlo, Calif., where he attending a convention. FBI Edgar Hoover aid in Washington: "This is ab- olutely false. The agent made o such statement and the FBI id not have such knowledge.' loover's statement was made n a telephone call to the Dallas 'imes Herald. lion at 1 S. Main unusually p. m. today at 108 Lcs Mcis in an serious mood V. T. Kallus reminding Knights of Columbus of a dance at tonight at KG Mark and Steve Canion pretty cxcitec these days in caring for a baby calf Jake Schlein explain ing to friends that one can learn something new every day, if oni simply listens Icy purchasing Delton Ash a new lie am Car! Van Way Jr. getting shine to bo ready for a wed ding today in Corpus Birthday greetings being ei tended to Mrs. Ruddy Meiscn hcldcr at Misson Valley and also to Miss Charlotte Ken ell Lcs Kickendahl takin a break to visit with customer Margie Koenning taking th opportunity to get in an ex change of greetings wit a friend Mrs. C. A. Knel getting ready for a Bon Am Home Demonstration Club Rum mage Sale at 6 a.m. today a the City Hall Square Mr Frank Briggs home from th hospital and out to water th lawn. L16 Absentee Ballots Cast One hundred and sisteen bal ots were on file in the count; clerk's office Friday as the sec >nd week of absentee voting for he May 2 Democratic and i u b 1 i c a n Primary election: :ame to a close. The count included 107 vote cast in the Democratic Primar; and nine on the Republicai side of the slate. Absentee voting will continu until 5 p.m. Tuesday. 250 Teams Due In 4-H Contests The District 10 4-H contcsL will begin Saturday at 9: a.m. at the Victoria Colleg Gymnasium. Some 250 teams and individu als from 22 counties will com pete in the 31 contests. Almos 4-H Club members, par ents and others are cxpecte to attend. Contestants will be winners o county contests already held. The first and second plac teams at Ihe district level wl advance to the state contest a 4-H Roundup to be held at Te; as University 2-4. ria Chapter of the Society for e Preservation and Encour- jement of Barber Shop Quartet nging in America. Tickets will be for gen- ral admission, and for re- erve seats. They may be pur- lased at the door, or securec advance from any membei the SPEBSQSA. The Victoria chapter will of its chorus and two quartets ie Humbugs and the Ever ows. Houston will send two of its utstanding quartets, the Foui 
                            

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