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Advocate: Sunday, April 19, 1964 - Page 1

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - April 19, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 118th 345 TELEPHONE HI 6-1451 VICTORIA, TEXAS, SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 19G4 Established 1816 Jet Wreck Found in Persian Gulf 23 Americans Among 49 Lost BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP) Divers reached Ihe wreckage of a jetliner in the Persian Gulf Saturday and reported they have given up all hope of find- ing any survivors among the 4B 23 Ameri- an airline spokes- man said. The French-built Caravelle of Middle East Airlines-Air Libyan plunged into the gulf while try- ing to land in a swirling sand- storm Friday night at Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. It was just three minutes from landing lime at the end of a two-hour nonstop flight from Beirut. Normal Approach Visibility at the time between 300 feet and feet. The pilot was reported making a normal landing approach when the plane lost contact with the tow- er in Dhahran. Most of the Americans aboard were employed or connected with the Arabian American Oil has head- quarters and a complex for its employes at Dhahran. Reports from Dhahran said only one body had been recov- ered and rescue operations were continuing. Rough Weather Rescue operations were being impeded by rough weather, which begnn easing slightly aft- er dark, the spokesman said The weather had cleared enough Saturday morning to permit a search by helicopter and small surface craft. A U.S. Navy spokesman reported the plane was sighted in shallow water between the British-pro- tected island of Bahrain in the Persian Gulf and Dhahran. Tlie exact location was given as miles south-southeast of Dhah-i ran. 1 The Navy said there were, no signs of survivors, although the fuselage of the plane was intact, with one broken wing Jutting up from the water. Name Personnel Among the Aramco personnel aboard were William Scott, 39, Pittsburgh, Kan., manager of public relations at Dhahran; Ralph Devenny, -IS, San Fran- cisco, genera! manager of in- dustrial relations; William Jew ell, 55, also of San Francisco, I r i wages and salaries coordinator, r1 and Dr. Frank Zukoski, 48, of Scrantoii, Pa., medical director of the Trans Arabian Pipeline Co. in Beirut. Besides the Americans, also aboard were 11 Saudi Arabians, 4 Lebanese, 1 Syrian, 1 Jordani- an, 1 Bahrein! and 1 Palestinian. 50 Pages Sparks are shown placing the tank BIRTH OF A FIKK TRUCK The before and after in construction of on the bed as Fire Chief Casey Jones, the city's new county tire truck is Assistant Fire Chief Tony Haschke' shown in these pictures taken before the tank was mounted on the bed and after it was com- pleted and docked out in full fire de- partment insignias. In the top' photo, City Garage Maintenance Superin- tendent Ralph Brown (on top of truck) a n d Shop Foreman Ezra Mayor Kempcr Williams Jr. and City Manager John Lee look on. In the picture below, Firemen Don Webb, Loyd West and Benson Pantel check the new tank truck after it is com- pleted and parked in the driveway of Central Fire Station. (Advocate Photos) Auto Turns on Driver In Spectacular Mishap Condition Of Waitress Satisfactory Second Wreck Injures Two Two spectacular traffic mis- haps in separate parts of the county Saturday left two per- sons hospitalized, with a child also receiving emergency treatment for injuries. More seriously injured of the trio was Mrs. Zana Hanna Gough, 21, of Nursery, who was run over by her own car 4.9 miles northwest of (he city limits on Cuero Highway al WASHINGTON (AP) Prcsi-ircsulls of that study. Of course, dent Johnson ordered a sweep-1it is the hope of everyone that ing study Saturday of military [tensions in Ihe world can ease, manpower policies to we can bring about disar- a.m. Mrs. Gough was listed in Stveeping Study of Draft Could Bring Termination thought Goldwater might go into the GOP nominating con- vention in Jul.v with some lKi2 votes and that more than 500 whether the draft can be elimi- mament, that we can take part votes "looked like a pretty solid nated in Ihe 1970s of the resources that arc Johnson made the announce- going into military production' Referring to Goldwaler, John- mcnt at his second news confer- and protection" and "spend son said, "I think lie will be up ence in three days, this one a them on a better society and pretty high." 35-niinute session in his office, igrealcr society." Declining to announce his ov satisfactory condition Saturday night at De Tar Hospital with fractures of her right ankle and foot, right shoulder and arm and multiple cuts and bruises. Lost Control Highway Patrolman Dalton G (Dutch) Meyer said Mrs. Gough was traveling toward Nursery when her 195-! coach went off on the right hand side of (lie roadway, made a half-circle and darted across the highway (o the opposite side where it spun around sev- eral times. In the process, Mrs. was I not announced in advance. The President said Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNa- mara will undertake the one- year study lo "consider alterna- tives to the present draft selec- tion system, including Ihe possi- bility of meeting our require- ments on an entirely voluntary basis in the next decade." Asked if this foreshadows a Draft calls this year have run1 candidacy for between and monthly. own election, the Politics again figured promi- nently in Johnson's give-and- take with newsmen. In response said, "I Iry to keep as far away from partisanship and campaigning as I can. I try to keep my political speeches restrained.1' lo ono question, Johnson seemed I The chief executive said ha to concede that Sen. Goldwatcr of Arizona lo "he president of all the is the people and do what I think is front-runner for the Republican'best for all HID people not just presidential nomination. jbcsl for Democrats, but best for cutback in military Johnson related that he talked i all Americans." the chief executive said: "liFriclay to a man "very knowl- wouldn't want to anticipate Iheledgab'le in public affai'rs" who He said it is "vorv damaging  m___ ly when struck by a car driveniCameron by Marion Leslie Johnson, 23, u- To! of 302 E. Brazos St. ton was headed south on Moody! and his assistant chiefs includ-jwilh olher birds, were moved and Luster Jones who became chief j u> lhe pond lasl year. The birds, Force kept all newsmen Lt. Tom Kennedy said Blan-'the late Fire s7 Shaw'portoT sin'ce'The away from lhe'sccne and P'tot ____' '__.< of! (he area. Police said Saturday doo" Unsnn wntiM nnt "le rlBnl _rear aoor Limn, nnaing ner reel wnnw nnt K v, 7 rear "oor ot tnc.on u blazo climbing rose an unusual K u palrol car was found of the, on Dec. 27 after Shaw was mass of red blooms Allan lor lhe dead of an apparent "u-t iiiuuui car was: luwiu 01 an app hat heavily damaged and will have heart allack at his home. an y e an w Barlosh in Houston for a Golf, ee ns s Walltln8 close lo Re replaced. The crash Tournament Arthur FrankeJ amusing friends with slories about son, Curtis Frank Kalinnivski doing his good deed for the day Frank Sala brightening Ihe day of a friend Airman 2nd Class Ernest Miller Jr. getting ready to shove off for his new base at Fort Lee, Va. afler a 2ft day leave with his parents Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Miller Davirti Kouha busy wilh some last minute Boy Scout details Buddy Seliocner trying to ex- plain but not getting the point over on how to rub two sticks together lo make a Boy Scout fire Mrs. Barbara Bowman in Re Tar Hospital wilh pneu- monia Helen Boiirnias in a rush to her Saturday morn- ing position Jim Hunt hav- ing paradoxical parking meter troubles the Rcv. Alois. Goertz out in the fresh air after recovering from a severe case of the flue Mrs. Etlicl Blakemorc and Al S. Vogl at- tending to final details of the social at Lourdes Hall tonight at p.m. and making it knnwn that everyone was in vited, (Spc rUNEHAL, Page C.A) Icurrcd at a.m. Ironically, the trip to Ken- (Sec TRUCK, Page liA) two! RETURNS TO MOSCOW Dangling From Balloon J, VALLEY, Calif. (AP) of circulation, was treated. He 12-year-old boy, danglingiwas transferred to lhe Army's a rope, was carried to a I.elterman General Hospital in of feet hy a balloon San Francisco. He is a son of retired Army ized the youngster's plight. Thomas E. Nowcll. The pilol, William Berry, Rack on the ground Danny of Concord, Calif., Ihen put the said he "wasn't loo scared." He hot-air balloon into a rapid "My arms began to hurl zoo became inadequate. isuitalions in Washington. IN A NOISY WORLD The Word Was King, a Writer Somebody NEW YORK Hecht, the author, died Saturday at the age of 70, leaving a legacy of millions of words in prinl and on film. An open book and his reading glasses lay beside his body. In a career which started as a cub reporter, Hecht turned out about 70 motion picture scripts, 26 books, 20 plays and hundreds of short slories and magazine arti- cles. He recalled being attracted to lhe profession when "lhe printed word was king, a writer was somebody and a novelist was an awesome sight." That year was 1010 in Chicago and Hecht, the New York-born son of immigrants from southern Russia, was a boy of 16 who had run away from home in Racine, Wis., to make his own way in life. These were the days of the "Chicago school" of American literature and Hecht, the short, stubby breaker of idols, took his place alongside Carl Sand- burg, Sherwood Anderson, Maxwell Bodenheim, Ring Lardner and lhe others. His fabulously successful career embraced almost every form of lhe written word, from newspaper ad- vertisement in support of the Palestine resistance fund to poetry in reply lo Broadway critics who panned one of his plays. At his peak he earned 500 in one day of writing in Hollywood. He once was in such demand in lhe movie industry that he could insist on a clause in his contract forbidding the producer to speak to him. llechl's wife, former news- paperwoman Rose Caylor, found him in a dressing room of their West 67th Strecl aparlmenl, lhe ap- parent victim of a heart at- tack. He was kneeling, with his face in a pillow. She pul her lips to his and tried lo brcalhe life back inlo her husband of 33 years. A police emergency squad administered oxygen. year including black swans, were moved to! MOSCOW n- Kohler returned The lad Danny Novell, o'f okay' now" He Lme through a urday from Valley, had volun-j without a scratch or even a ropa ttashinulnn iecred wilh others to hang a deep rope impres- restraining ropes unlil the pilotjsion on his fingers, was ready for Ms ascent. I Berry gave the signal. AlllTFJE cast the lines away except! n IH young Nnwell. He had wrapped! his rope around his left wrist.' Cloudy to partly cloudy and As the lad was jerked into thej c n n u c d warm Sunday air 75 horror-stricken spectators ilnrollKn Monday. Chances of screamed. Some women knelt in ia fcw afternoon show- prayer. crs- Daytime southeasterly Berry, sitting in the balloon at 12 to 25 m-P-n- Ex- Funeral services will he conducted Tuesday at lhe Temple Rodeph Sholom in Manhattan. His blue eyes twinkled wilh lhe glee of a small boy playing a secret prank on everybody as Ilechl, on the eve of his S5ih birthday, lold Associated Press columnist Hal Boyle: "I hale people who wake up in the morning and know whal they'll Ihink and say all day." Puffing on a long cigar during the interview he could also chew gum at Iho same lime Hecht slabbed out in all directions, piercing lhe foibles of his day and skewering the follies of man- kind. This was his way, also, with pen an eruption of words. He once wrote a screen- play for Ronald Coleman overnight. He, dictated a novel in 36 hours. "I think it's bettor lo keep writing lhan to labor over every word, trying lo make il a Hcchl once said. "I'm a professional writer, as another man might he a professional carpenter. Writing is easy. It's the re- writing that's hard. I write a book three times." The springboard lo fame and riches for Hechl was "The Front the hit play he wrote In collabora- te WRITER, Page 6A) basket, could not see Nowell dangling directly below him. peeled Sunday lempcratures- High (16, low 70. At a height of feet Berry South Central Texas: Cloudy sensed lhat something was to partly cloudy and warm, amiss. iSunday through Monday with He saw (he boy and al mostly afternoon show- cul off the fans that forced hoticrE mainly near the coast. High air inlo the 50-fool-high balloon. 'Sunday 85-05. Berry descended gently in the! Temperalures Saturday: High back yard of Robert Dcswall, 85, low 71. Iwo miles from the launching. Danny was taken to Marin General Hospital where his left hand, badly discolored from loss Today's Chuckle Once there was a Texan who needed a blood trans- fusion hut he cnuhln't find anyone with Type 8 blood. Tides (Port Lavaca Port O'Connor High at p.m. Sunday. Low at a.m. Monday. Barometric pressure at s e a level: 30, Sunset Sunday: 6.57. Sunrise. Monday: Thli Information tiMxt on diU (See Wtither Ltuwherj,   

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