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Advocate: Saturday, April 18, 1964 - Page 1

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - April 18, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 118th 344 TELEPHONE HI S-14J1 VICTORIA, TEXAS, SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 19G4 Established 1848 Squall Rips Area North Of Houston Woman Dies In Trailer By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A 20-year-old misherl to death and her son and mother injured when their trailer ho___ ..__ demolished by a powerful squall that lashed Harris County. Killed was Mrs. Norma Jones, 28, Injured were liam Edward Jones, 3, and Mrs Oly M. Wolfe, 65. The incident occurred on Gaull in North Harris County about p.m. At Cleveland, windstorm, accompanied heavy rain and hai trees, damaged roofs, blew out sh in business houses windows out of the court house. Storm Alert Houston and the rest cast Texas were under a severe thunderstorm alert for six hours late Friday. The alerted area ..__ ._. miles wide and centered by a line from 20 miles Houston to Baton Roi Nearly a thousand the northwest, another storm annoyed the Pai Visibility was down to at Dalhart. North Overcast In between, and from lo East Texas, skies sometimes were clear but usual! cloudy. Rain fell at I the piney woods of Es: A lot of North Texas u cast. Ten miles north of Hi Spring, a storm upronl and caused other around noon. Moderate rain fell in Beaumont where winds rose to 35 miles an hour. Small craft warnings along the Texas coast fror.. Arthur to Corpus Christi. Funnel Near Rio Showers and thund were expected to devf and north of a sou cold front moving east ing the night. The northern half will be cooler Satur south half will still forecasters said. which they had been by wire. The tornado a dozen utility poles, jured no one. Over Austin Another tornado pasbcu Austin but did not touch. San Antonio had win f Arts Department court agi ay. High School, will be so E e of Cofer, co jed near Amistad orthwest r high school band will play several marching numbers. The invocation will be given by the Rev. E. Rowoldt of W e e-satche. The Rev. R. A. lo the U.S. On Wednesday, ed for the third peal from the conviction, but piers to will offer a dedicatorv prayer, and Ihe Rev. P. J. one more ap earlier opinion will give the stay keej but being enfo sed Judge L. S. Benge and Commissioners Bill Barnh i 1 Court view the convic Abrameit, Jack 39, 7 1962 o' ds up Edwin Lude will cut t h ore dawn officially opening t h e building. Visitors will then be invited to inspect the results ne persuad sign a c on nonexistent The state alle had face-lifting mulliminioin county offices largelj hours the court house last week pape d more than eight months leased fro surroundings the gle renovation job was in lawyers 5 paid Ihe !0, started last July for lenc oint items including a 100! addition, interior El Paso fe oy and installation of Estes Del cooling and elevator 1963, on fou erne 1.01 ine 1 and one o him 15 The conviction pealed but has et is Hie one is free of getting nothing in APPE >alurday, vicemen, of State fl WOMAN 12 Cents allotled." He sower service can be made erald Hills, subdivisions border water line tapping fees, in new subdivisions only. "Our present charge all over the cily is Lee said, "but because of certain facilities which developers normally pro- vide they feel that a double charge is being made against them." The ordinance proposes to re- duce the rate to in n e w subdivisions. Other items on the agenda are final reading of an ordinance regulating parking on portions of North Main and East Red River streets, and discussion of possible ways ol controlling ob- jectionable noises in the city. ial of Byron a dedicated jsed of killing of the Mississippi ivement, ended hung jury. driven to Tex. (AP) Billie y a 90-day him on a Estes' attorney, could appeal the ap- lecides to re- in, convicted on ollar financial by discounting 1 on fertilizer n farmers whc n on credit contended he farmers a cash ng their gooc March 28 has been ap by several residents of his home town. "When we arrived at Tchula here was a sign saying, 'Wel- come home, DoLay' antt when got to the outskirts of Green- vood there was another said. "It brought tears a my eyes." H was the first time Bcckwilh lad been in Greenwood since he was arrested 10 months ago. "You don't know how good it s to be back he said. Beckwith telephoned his wife rom the office of Sheriff George Smith and said, "I'll be over there in just a minute. We lave to tend fo this bond busi- less and sign a few papers and I'll be right along." Beckwith, a Greenwood, Miss fertilizer salesman, is accuser, of being the sniper who shot Ne- integration leader Mertger Evers in the back last June 12, The crime inflamed racial tensions in this Southern state and shocked the nation. The all-white jury reported it ielf hopelessly deadlocked afte 18 hours of deliberation anc many ballots. Tho vote was eight to four for acquittal. Th first trial ended Feb. 7 with th jury divided six to six. It was not certain whether there would be a third trial Disl. Atty. William Waller sai( it was not definite the slate would prosecute the case fur ther. "I don't see any way we could ever put on a better case than we did at this he said. Hardy Lott, Beckwith's chie. attorney, said the defense woulc decide later whether to press for another trial. The case, because it ended in a mistrial, will come up at the May term of Circuit Court. I is not likely to be tried then since the May term normally is limited to civil cases. The jurors deliberated seven hours Thursday and anothe three Friday before Judge Hen drick called them into the court room and asked them individ ually if there was any hope o reaching a verdict. All the replies were negative and the judge declared a mis trial have forcing a wearing out 12 men such as you." Beckwith appeared tinper (Sec BECKWITH, Page 3) with this comment: never been in favor Dr. Byron Griffin offering a crew call for the Trail of Six Flags Theater for p.m. to- day (o work on the secret set for Romanoff and Juilctt Mrs. Lillian Mowery much im- proved at De Tar Hospital and ready for visitors Joe Ruddock thinking of taking les sons again Cowboy" on "How to Be a Edward Kainer declaring the war with black- birds over and putting his gun up for another year Mrs. Eugene N a q u i n reminding members of the James W. Fan- nin Chapter, Daughters of the Republic of Texas of the lunch- eon today at noon at Power Home, with Miss Catherine McDowell of San Antonio, as guest speaker wcel getting Catherine Ta- all set for the Splash Day festivities at Sun Valley Country Club to include a style show and a buffet meal Sunday B. F. Olosovsky and J. Brady registering con- cern over baby chicks Bob Hagel of Telferner doing his good deed for the day Jim Sain philosophizing about the old golden rule of "doing unto others CJLUMBUS, Ohio rie Mock set her single-engine plane down at Port Columbus at p.m. Friday night and became the first woman to fly solo around the world. "Jerrie, we've got a cold one on the rocks waiting for a message went out from the airport's control tower. The 38-year-old housewife de- scended the red and white "Spl- it of Columbus" to hugs and kisses from her three children and husband, Russell, and to cheers from thousands of spec- tators. The warm spring evening and the historic landing attracted Columbus residents to the air- port observation (ieck, Waving and smiling, Mrs. Mock re- sponded to state and city offi- cials and a score of newsmen and photographers on the windy field. The aviatrix began her long flight home Friday morning from Tucson, Ariz. She flew first to El Paso, Tex. to pick up extra mileage required for the record books in establish- ing round-the-world flight. She logged about 200 flight hours and also set a record as the tirst woman to fly solo across the Pacific Ocean. The 5-foot, 105-pound brunette! made the trip from El Paso here with one slop at Bowling Green, Ky., to "I don't know what to THE WEATHER Cloudy to partly cloudy and warmer Saturday through Sun- day with chance of few widely scattered afternoon showers. Winds will be southeasterly at 15 to 25 m.p.h. Expected Satur- day temperatures: High 85, low 68. South Central Texas: Cloudy to partly cloudy through Sun- day with widely scattered most- ly afternoon showers. No im- portant temperature changes. High Saturday 82-92. Temperatures Friday: High 81, low M. Precipitation Friday: .30. Tot- al to date this year: 7.05 inches. Tides (Port Lavaca Port O'Connor High at a.m. Saturday. Low at a.m. Sunday. Barometric pressure at s e a level: 30.01. Sunset Saturday: S u n- rise Sunday: Thli information on (rom the U.S. Vlclorla Ofllct. Mrs. Mock said. "I've never seen so many people." Appearing flustered and rath er tongue-tied, she quipped, should get my auto-pilot here ti talk to me." Mrs. Mock was presented will a lei of orchids, which she draped around her neck. Will her hair hanging loose and blow ing in the wind, she called the trip, but "I didn' get much sleep or food or any thing." A telegram of congratulations was received from Presiden Johnson and read over a loud speaker system. The Federal Aviation Agency informed Mrs. Mock that a spe- cial medal is being struck for her for exceptional service to avialion and will ho presented at some future trip to Washing- ton. As she left Port Columbus on March 19 she radioed the air- port tower, "I'll see you in three but Friday night's ar- rival was 29 days from the start- ing time, mainly because of a seven-day delay in Bermuda be- cause of bad weather. It didn't matter, though, since the Federacion Aeronautlque In- ternationale which sanctioned the flight permits 90 days for the globe-girdling trip. LBJ Cites Dangers in Hail Strike 7 Million Jobs Would Be Lost WASHINGTON (AP) Pres- cient Johnson said Friday night nationwide railroad strike would almost paralyze our vhole system." Johnson said a strike would ause the loss of 7 million jobs n a very short time and would ause a downturn in the nation's otal production of 10 to 15 per ent. Speaking to a group of news- >aper editors in the While louse rose garden, Johnson Iso said a national train tieup ,'ould create "great dangers in ealth" to Ihe nation's people. Night Sessions Johnson spoke as negotiators or five unions and nearly 200 ailroads continued day and ight sessions in emergency largaining talks set up by John- on. Johnson's remarks to (he vis ting editors were part of an ev emporaneous talk about "the ob which fale has thrust upon ne." He gestured in Ihe direction >f the Executive Office Building iexl door to the While House ind told the editors that ncgo- ialors and federal mediators 'ere "engaged in intensive col- eclive bargaining" there. Help Problem He said he set up the talks 'to help railroad labor and rail- oad management solve their A cautious nole of hope fil- ered nut of the tightly guarded negotiations. "1 think we're getting some- said a source close lo he While House negotiations >etween five unions and nearly 200 railroads. Should Know Monday The White House, controlling all official information on the talks, still refrained from de- scribing the outlook as eilher jplimislic or pessimistic, al- -hough President Johnson said Thursday he hopes for a volun- :ary settlement by the end of this week. Johnson said he should know by Monday whether the talks can succeed. A a.m. April 25 slrike deadline hangs over the nego- tiations. The White House said Friday :hat the negoliations now center on solid proposals from each side. But White House press secre- .ary George Reedy said Cie alks are still in the give-and- :ake stage, with no permanent concessions from either side. Johnson, dealing with the (See LIU, Page 3) 14-Year-Old Boy Dies When Hit By Auto in City ROYAL PAIR _ Madeline Murphy and Sherman Barnctte wore crowned Queen and King of the Junior-Senior prom of Nazareth Academy and St Joseph Friday night. Other members of. the royal court were Princess Diane Roberts, escorted by Prince Tim Bundick; Princess Barbara Pribyl escorted by Prince Gilbert Cano; Duchess Judy Fatten, escorted by Ted Schoenburg; and Duchess Karen Miori, escorted by Duke Rod Gobar. Doctors' Slrike Ends in Belgium BRUSSELS, Belgium Belgium's doctors' strike ended early Saturday after 18 days of wrangling by the government and the strikers over provisions of a controversial socialized medical law. Justice Minister Pierre Vor- meylen read newsmen a com- munique saying the embattled doctors had agreed to call off the strike. He added that no understand- ing was reached, however, on the conflicting points of view concerning the new medical legislation. Catholic Youth Revue Tonight The first of a two-night musi- cal revue by Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Youth Organi- zation will take place Saturday night at St. Mary's Hall. It will be presented again Sun- day night, with the starting lime both nights sel for B p.m. The revue, which proved Stolen Crucifix Back in Church The gold crucifix of Ihe in-fed and returned to the church valuable .100 year old rosary; Sheriff M. W. Marshall said that was stolen lust Dec. ai Friday. from the vestibule of St, Pat- Marshall said the crucifix was rick's Catholic Church in found at a pawn shop in Cnrls-lfheydid say That hTwas'walk- Bloommglon has been recover- bad, N. M., and rclurncct lo, ing nearest to Hie roadway with Bloommglon Thursday night on his left Deputy Sheriff Jimmy Kubcckn Wiggins w a s 'pronounced Victim 4th Pedestrian Killed in '64 Was Helm-nine; O From Theater By JAA1KS SIMONS Aclvnrntr Staff Writer Eugene Wiggins, 14-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Har- ms of :1GOC Cedar St., was filled Friday night when struck >y n ear across the street from Ihe Jet Drive Inn in the 2500 block of Houston Highway. Police said young Wiggins ivas walking with a companion, Gene Stanford, 15, of 3208 Cy- piess St., on the left hand side of tlic road when he was struck almost head-on by the right front fender of a wagon leing driven by Marion Leslie Johnson, 23-year-old service slalion attendant who resides at 302 E. Brazos SI., Apt. 3. The boy's mother said she Ihoiifiht lie had been lo the Lone-Tree Drive Inn Theater bul police wore unable lo ex- plain why the youths were walking in Ihe area of the drive-in cafe which is out of the way from where they would have been walking home from the drive-in theater. Details Missing Complete details of the acci- dent were not available at a late hour however police esti- mated that Wiggins was knocked approximately 53.9 feet by the impact. They said they wore unablo lo determine how close lo the highway Wiggins WHS walking. 3 Escapees of Blnomiiiglon and Gino lioi'iuisconi, the church. licv. the priest al The sheriff said efforts lo re- dead on Memorial arrival al Citizens Hospital in a Mc- Cabc-Cnrrutli ambulance at p.m. He died (rom mul- gold beads1 liple injuries. Being Sought __........... I cover (he 55-hollov AUSTIN (AP) A sheriff's i which arc believed to be some- '.Justice oT'the Peace Alfred car stolen wlien three men where in New Mexico will he Baass withheld a verdict pend- >roke out of the Lee Counly jail in Giddings was found aban- iloned Friday about six miles north of Brenham, Ihe after being arresled in'ters. ment of Public Safely reported.1 March in Richmond, Ind. Ed- The three men broke out of, wards, who was posing as a _______ the jail Friday morning. The; priest at the time of his arrest, east ami Ihe station wagon was statewide alert sent oul by Ihe'admitted the theft and told of continued. Waller W. Edwa r d s ing investigation by police, who was! were questioning Johnson and charged with stealing the ros-j witnesses at police headquar- nn.vs Walking Knst The two boys were walking Department of Public Safety warned they were heavily armed. selling all parts of the rosary to antique dealers in Carlsbad nnd Roswell, N. M. He said he! year with traveling west, Wiggins' death was the third inside the city limits for the They slugged Sheriff Vernon fashioned a Invaliere out of! car-pedestrian Goodson with an iron pipe when part of Ihc hearts. Edwards is; came only three days after resulting from accidents. It Ke brought their breakfast. They took his pistol and purse and [hen onu of his cars, in an automatic shotgun and an-! priceless rosary was donated to, death loll now stands'at six, presently in custody of federal'six-year-old Inez boy was killed officers for various offenses. when struck by a car in front The only one of its kind, (he "f his home. The city-county other pistol were loaded. the church in by Mr. and! four of these pedestrians. The Officers listed Ihe fugitives as Mrs. Patrick Welder in memory! count at this lime last year Bobby Phelps, 17, of Welder's parents, Mr and was seven deaths. Billy Roc, 18, and Henry Bnker, Mrs. Patrick Welder. It 21, both of They were was the prnpi indicted for burglary yeslerday. Philip of Spain. once1 Funeral arrangements were the property of King! pending Friday night with Buf- I (Sec HOY, Page 3) Officers Handcuffed, Shot By Band of Car Thieves LAWRENCEVILLE, Oa. of one son, was ill, jail, said he made the policemen were other night watch officers call to the officers alter A C cuffed together and shot to were taking him home telephoned him about .death in a remote wooded area they received a radio call to in-1 a.m. and reported two cars _____......... ajcarly Friday afler the three apJvestigate suspicious activity were running back and forth on popular attraction last year, has Parenlly surprised a gang (he Northeast Express- a dirt road in front of his been expanded this time to in- clude the favorite songs and dances of South America. Over 100 colorful dresses and boys apparel have been designed and made by Mrs. Mary Ruiz for the revue. Admission is for adults and 75 cents for students. ty officers were on a mercy] mission al the lime. One of (hem was 111 and the other two three City Drainage Project Begun Work has begun on the Navar- ro System of Drainage Project No. 4 under Ihe city's 000 drainage and paving bond program. The contractor began work this week after being awarded the job last month. The Navarro work was given priority among five systems to be installed under this contract because the drainage must be completed in order for the State Highway Deparlmenl lo initi- ate its paving and widening on Navarro. car thieves. Ironically, the Gwinnell Coun- )way. house. taking him home, were married. Two them had chilrlren. The bodies of Jerry R. Eve- rett, 2R; Ralph K. Davis, 40; and J. N. Gravitt, 52, were found in a pile in an area about 15 miles northeast of Atlanta. Investigators .said indications were the men died from bullets fired from Ihcir own pistols. There were bullet wounds in their heads and stomachs. The officers' pistols were missing. FBI agents were assisting with technical police, sheriff's aspects officers hut and Georgia Bureau of Investigation agents were handling the in- quiry. "f figure there were at least five or six in the gang of car said J. 0. Bell, coun- ty police chief. Tho chief said Gravitt, the! SUNDAY PREVIEW Tim PruiU, dispatcher at the County Commissioner Uhlan ..Freeman said Mills saw some of the developments from his home. One of the cars roared off but the officers overtook it and re- turned to where Ihe other car was parked. Soon afterward the dome light in the police car went out. "We assume that they gained control of the officers at that Freeman said. "They handcuffed the three officers together, put them in one of their cars and proceeded down a dirt road about half a mile to an old house. "There they took the officers out, walked them through Iho pines about 30 yards off the road, lined them up and shot them." The tragedy was discovered, after a motorist saw [he aban- doned police car. "The thieves had backed the police car off the road and stripped it of radio, siren and blinker he said. V n u r s u h conscious "bugs" every time you write your name on n credit ap- plication nr government form, so hlilden cameras and microphones are not even needed (o bare your secrets. So says a local Rraplioanalyst in a story on handwriting analysis in Ihe Sunday Fun .Mngnzine. Organized crime is nothing new lo America ac- cording to Paul I. Wellman's "Spawn of reviewed by lioy Grimes In "Hooks and Things." Academy Awnril win- ning movies arc on lap for Victorians. Read aboul rhcm hi the Kun movie column.   

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