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Advocate Newspaper Archive: April 17, 1964 - Page 1

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Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - April 17, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 118th 343 TELEPHONE HI 6-H51 VICTORIA, TEXAS, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 1964 Established 1848 City, County Plan Joint Drain Study Rimoff Growing Problem For Residents to North By TOM E. FITE Advocate Staff Writer Victoria Planning Commis- sion moved a slep closer to joint planning with Victoria County Commissioners Court Thursday with the aid of some property owners who own expensive homes between the Victoria city limits and the rapidly-develop- ing area to the north. Louis Gasche and Basil Bell appeared before the commis- sion, with County Commissioner Victor Weber, to ask what could be done about the increased rainfall runoff which is being created by development of suburban subdivisions. "We are concerned particu- larly with Northside Estates, Norlhcrest and the proposed Kathryn Gasche told lhe commission. He and other spokesmen said that many homes lie in a rela- tively low area into which the runoff from the previously men Uoned subdivisions drains. on property owners within the district boundary. In other action, the commis- sion spent almost an hour Iry- ing to work put a suitable ar- rangement with the Elks for development of the club's property just south of Magruder Drive and west of Navarro Street. The Elks' property joins Stephenson Subdivision, and was (Sec STUDY, Page 6) 14 Cents LOSES BID Lt. Frank K. Ellis, the Navy's only double amputee flyer, lost his bid to regain full flight status, but he will be allowed to continue his career as a Navy flyer subject to certain re- strictions, it was announced in Coronado, Calif. LI. Ellis is shown in a simulated plane cockpit in which he took fitness tests to continue his flyins career. FINE ASSESSED J3J Aim in Rail Row Harmony by Weekend U.S. Fiscal Slowly-Moving 01 fi i O shape Good, m TT., P T.I.I 'Truck Hits Girl Press Told Sees Passage Of Rights Bill WASHINGTON (AP) Prcs- ident Johnson said Thursday Margaret Hmojosa, who the nation's economy and de- vvl" bc two ycars Saturday. Juan Linn, but she apparently mumo. .11 county court found Edward Gasche told the commission S.ancters. of Seadrift guilty and that the homes themselves are not endangered, but "we may Yim Thursday in a case Med by the Commission nui enuangereo, out we may met.1 uy me uummission lose some bridges and possibly charging him with unlawful tak- some roads, too, with the first of fisn bir a seine from good rain." Hynes Bay Feb. 22, 1954. The problem, it was ex- jjiv, jjj u v I V Hi t II CA- ujiv. u.i plained, is that as large areas County commercial fishermen are subdivided and streets in- wno tried unsuccessfully to pre. slalled, rain water runs off vent closing of Calhoun much faster to the lower levels; Counly Waters to commercial indeed, much water runs off to fishing over a several month indeed, much water runs off to 'lsning over a several month sented as evidence. in the area that h the lower areas which formerly Period last year, pleaded hisj Sanders stated that he has designated as el stayed where it fell and even- 9wn case before County Judge'ncver seen a map that desig- and that Sanders tuallv soaked inln urnimiH Howard G. Hartzoe bafore a nalns whm-p ihn have in rmn nt J ill. i LI ovtll IllufJ Ijldl ULnlU- Hartzog before a nates where the bays specifical- begin and end, 'nor is there stayed wnere 11 leu and even- "OB tually soaked into the ground. G Gasche and his delegation had ecl no suggested solution, but mere- ly asked the commission to T T O T -i -i study Uie problem to determine U.5. LOUl! trPailted tLCllia For City Improvements what might be done. Commissioners have discussed for months the coming drainage problem which Gasche spoke on, as well as the need for longrange planning of what Advornic HUM Service will eventually be thoroughfare EDNA Edna City Council, wlln slliuv -streets. Such thoroughfares will moved Thursday nighl to pro-1 Morris Seligman said be needed not only lo handle ceeci with plans to call a bond He said Mayor A D Tinker'fmm the waters, asked Chil- mcreasing traffic, but to afford election for major city had called the meeting lo thal if tlle commission rapid access for police and fire provcments after receivingjcuss the loan confirmation n ccrlain percentage of protection. rrlfrcm Clark! lhe possible next step fo" the drums sllollld be removed W. Thompson that a Sssnn fnrl. XL IC1 mei would it not be the policy of Thursday they told Gasche W. Thompson that a fed- eral loan for preliminary plan- they do not know how his prob- lem can be solved but, on a nmg had becn aPProved. motion by Commissioner John A council member said Folger, called for a joint meet- ing with commissioners Court to investigate this and other problems in areas of over-lap- ping city and county responsi- bility. Commissioner Weber said the o i i court would be glad lo meet ,Sfl I'il ll Klflr with the city board and discuss kjcl1- cl11 the problem, but no date was set for the proposed session. Among possible solutions dis- cussed was the formation of a had no idea when the ordinance calling the election might be passed. "We have just received our confirmation (on the planning Schus- lereit deciding that the weather Mrs- w- Sparks, assistant was ideal for catching up with county school superintendent, the oulsidc chores in the coun- was in cnarge of the program. A group of Victoria College try John Parkinson finding a sprained finger is of no help to a baseball player J. R. werc Webernick of Ganado in town ouncer; on business on usiness Mrs. Henry Schocncr announcing plans for a rummage sale Saturday begin- JutlSes- ning at 6 a.m. at the City Hall Square, which is being spon- sored by the Guadalupe Valley "UJIldll School Food Service Assn. building JJGiayS IJutch Meyer seen out an extra large dog house, com- plete with shingles Roland Ring explaining that one American woman flyer J has lo have patience for three Mcrriam decided Friday to years after planting Amaryllis 'ay hcr departure from Darwin seed, but that patience pays off for 24 ''ours because of bad with a bloom Ray Nelson weather. and Tim flargslcy arriving home on leave from the Navy 11 uiii mi; iiavy ui LJOI will, wnuio iVJtoS J. B. McDonald discussing the Merriam, 27, of Long Beach, value of good customers arrived Thursday night, Jim Shipley getting some quick spent three hours Friday morn- service for a friend who was in ing frying to dissuade her from a hurry Betty Letiff ex- continuing her flight to Guam plaining the merits of her au- via New Guinea, lomobile Margie Reaves Miss Merriam is tmos iviuiimill IS attemplmS admitting that it was a good to follow Amelia Earhart's path da for h day for having lunch out. wc Mrs. Manuel Guajardo remind- so far has covered of her ing ol lhe Our Lady of Sorrows planned miles. She now Altar Society games party at plans to leave Darwin at dawn Q tsminhf aitVinnit-icUlinll i., __ i_.. 8 tonight at'the parish hall. Calhoun Jury Convicts Man on Seining Charge me iionun a ami admitted to (he nosp Irtl fense are both in gond shape. 's the daughter of Mr. thilt He came closer than ever be- Mrs- Joe 309 S. "his time of fore to confirming he'll run for The child was struck by a! in jury president in November. [nick driven by Edgar A. An- Tire marks were in- MARY BAKEft PHILLIPS Advocate Port Lavaca Bureau PORT LAVACA A jury Sanders, one of the Calhoun any law that states where the bay begins and ends. Witnesses for the defendant, all of Seadrift, were: Mayor Y. Z. Helms, manager of Lavaca Trawlers, who testi- fied that the fish he buys from the area are 100 per cent drum. Felix Garcia, manager of Sea- drift Fish Co. whose testimony concurred with Helms. Dennis Wittenbert, Game Warden Homer Rober- son, sole witness for the state, testified that he encountered Sanders and his boats ill Hynes Bay, located on the west border of Calhoun Couty, on a routine patrol. He said Sanders 'main boat was anchored and in the standard procedure of commer- cial fishing, using nets in ex- cess of the maximum of 20 feet permitted by law. He confiscat- ...utiiwud, vummiii- ed a portion of Sanders nets, cial fisherman, who testified valued at which he pre- thai there are two large lakes in the area that have not been closed waters, _.......rs could have been in one of the lake areas. Ray Childress. marine biolo- gist, who testified the larg- est percentage of fish caught in Hynes Bay are drum and that he believed that it would be beneficial to remove as much as 50 per cent of them. County Attorney Jack Fields, who represented' the stale, ir president in November. truck driven by Edgar A. An- Johnson spoke at n far-rang- gerslcm, who had just taken (he on the left side of the child's jing and heavily attended news Iruck out of reverse gear, andibody. conference that was, as he took note, well-advertised in advance md carried live on radio and television. Morally _..o... "We will pass (he civil rights bill because it is morally 10 said. At the same time he deplored extreme measures some advo- cates of federal civil rights laws A r have threatened, measures that Austin residents watched a menacing tornarlb would seek to dramatize their :ause by civil disobedience tac- _______..... did not touch ground in the city and it dissipated "We do not, of course, con- south of Austin. sn e sae, r [grant) and we are going aheadi3 discussion on the failure of the our Aldcrman'wlltllife department to issue a o- Morris Seli contract for takin rouh fish he Top Speller Sarah Rick, a seventh grade at Crain Junior city. i would it not be the policy of At one point he was told thai Thompson wired The Advo- tne department to issue a members of the American Soci- cate that Housing and f'sh contract, which had ety of Newspaper Editors, many Finance Agency had approvertjbeon refused Sanders. of whom were in his news con- a pranl nf S5 5fm tn nfi nhiMrncc rial fnrpnco hari anr a grant of to the city Childress stated that he did o e cy ress sae a e n e an Edna "for preliminary planning not believe so, that he believed aP1' tllev overwhelmingly pre- in connection with streets, that would come under regula drainage and storm authority. facilities and water! Sanders Ihen asked who gave tho wildlife commission the right to abrogate or lo do away with facilities." Such loans are granted Tornado Misses 11 HP i 1 exas Capital leplored J_ busy intersection of cloud, presumably snatched off the ground somewhere in ference, had been polled and for1 preliminary engineering studies, and are repayable to the fed- eral government at a low rate of interest only if the recipient the law thai has heen on the books since 1929. Fields charged that Sanders :was bringing a "crusade legislature dieted his election. Johnson smiled and drew a laugh by replying: "I hope that they feel in No- vember as they do in April." Johnson opened his news con- ference with the joking reassur- ment bonds, ssxrSSs thority of the Commissioners T Court and their activities are tile daughler of Mr. financed by an ad valorem tax Mrs' Roberl Rick of 1101 Poplar, will represent Victoria County in the regional contest to be held in Corpus Christ! May 9. Runner-up was Barbara Sny- der, 13, who stumbled on the word "imaginary." Sarah TT i in .1. ii, spelled that word correctly, Fred (Brother) Wcpreck re- and then knocked off "impor ceivmg birthday congratulations iance- ,0 lhe tit today Judge Wayne Hart- r, man deciding on a short walk were needcd for his health Edwin Schus- the champion. city subsequently passes ,he- bond issue. H for any the courtroom, .ilhe city fails to issue improve-; hc h fj w m ance that "I (lid not drive my- were self over a reference to Dust Today's Chuckle Sign on a Texas street: "Last Cadillac dealer f o r three blocks." Fields, _ noticably nettled. "He is fight utes of the 30-minute conference to prepared statements. In these he said: and 80s. Continued warm wcalh- ing in the wrong place. "HO should see his representative i'. Trillion's'Gross National oTwTs' in Victoria and the legislature Product rose in the first quarter all Texas zones hut m Austin. All we ask is, is he of 1964 lo an annual rate of west guilty of being in closed billion, up billion (Sec JURY, Page C) (See ECONOMY. Page G) students also assisted. They Jean McLachlan, pro- grams, and called for a re-eval- T ,i nation of Texas' fight against and Jean Albrechl, Frances Hargrove, Vivian Sylvia Wacker, DARWIN, Australia (AP) Ameriean woman flyer Joan Department of Civil Aviation officials in Darwin, where Miss in a globe-girdling flight which Saturday. Official Urges TB Tests, Treatment Be Revitalised By PAT WITTE Advocate Staff Writer A state health official crili. oized haphazard testing pro element in an effective control program, he said, is a periodic suspected of having TB, tuberculosis Thursday night in Victoria. Dr. Howard E. Smith, direc- tor of the Division of Tuber- culosis and Chronic Diseases of the Texas State Department of Health, spoke at the annual meeting of the Victoria County Tuberculosis Association, and told lhe members of the organi- zation thai although there are many useful tools which can be used in the battle against TB, they are not being used as ef- fectively as Ihey should be. examination of the immediate family of a known victim, and others who come in daily con- tact with the victim. Finally, Smith said, the com- munity should maintain close THE WEATHER He said that loo many com- munities have exhausted their supervision of those who aulu IJUIJ If a community maintains an curator of the Shuler Museum adequate safeguard over these of Paleontology at SMU. The re_ will mains were excavalcd rccentl three broad areas in ils con- trol resources largely ineffective, and at lhe same time have neglected the care and treatment of the known victims nf tuberculosis. Mostly cloudy with few widely scattered showers Friday and Saturday, Southerly lo southeas- terly winds at 15 to 25 m.p.h. Expected Friday temperatures: Low 66, high 82. South Central Texas: Consid- erable cloudiness Friday and Saturday, with widely scattered mostly daytime showers. High :s in mass detection pro- fraay 77'87' which he noted arc Temperatures Thursday: Low callod 60, high 77. Precipitation Thursday: Trace Tides (Port Layaca-Port 0'- Connor High at 8ram K A small girl was struck by Irsvellng forward slowly, truck in the parking area who told invcstigat- Angerslem's Market shortly af-iinB Patrolman Cary Taylor that er noon Thursday at 915 E. llc see the child, accom- p-nied the child and parents to The attending physician said Thursday evening that she was admitted to (he hospilrtl (or ob- ''there is no serious It was estimated the funnel cloud passed over the Inter- path. lone violence or taking the law nlo your own hands, or threat- ening the health or safety of our he said. "You really do Congress Avenue and Inter-, 7 .he civil rights cause no good stale 35 in Austin. Al Pleasant V V when you go to this extent. Hill to the south, witnessesl A T dcbris lhc of one riglil, or the denial of one right, should permit the vi- olation of another right." Johnson seemed relaxed and confident as he talked, slowly and often with a half-smile, of the problems facing him as president and declared: "I'm enjoying the job and I'm prepared to continue." That was one of several ref- erences tying him closer lo the almost universally accepted be- lief that the Democrats will nominate him in August lo run for president in November. Up to Thursday, however, hc hadn't Heavy Kaln Application Dismissed M''Sl Rllbin Mrs' Frel gained same limefrom LampnsBs.1 rs' res ganed northwest of Austin, to Ft. Hood, inside track Thursday for near Temple. Weather Bureau radar tracked an area of light showers and a Channel television permit Vicloria when the Federal Communications Commissi o n an area of light showers and aon ommsson few weak thunderstorms also in Washington that the afternoon along and 110 It Woved a request from miles east of a line from 60 Telecasting miles west of Waco to 10 miles Co'. for 
                            

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