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Advocate Newspaper Archive: April 16, 1964 - Page 1

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Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - April 16, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 118th 342 TKl.KI'HONE HI 5-H51 VICTORIA, TEXAS, THURSDAY, APRIL 1G, 19G4 Established 1848 30 Cents Goldwater Stirs U.S. Power Row Crilics Flayed By McNamara WASHINGTON (API Sen. Barry Goldwater kept the Pen-; lagon dispute over U.S. military might rolling Wednesday by ac-l cusing President Johnson' andj Secretary of Defense Robert S. i McNamara of "letting our pow-i er lag and slide." 1 "Unless the defense policies ofi this administration are [he Arizona Repub- lican said, "we will face a deterrent gap through which the full force of advanced So- j viet weapons mav be fell." Locking Horns Goldwater's charges, pre- pared for delivery al a lial primary campaign rally Long Beach, Calif., came in the; wake of McNamara and Gen. Curtis E. I.cMay, Air Force' chief of staff, locking horns! over the nation's military stand-' LeMay said in congressional; testimony made public Tuesdayj thai the Soviet Union has nar-; rowed Ihe margin of U.S. mili- tary superiority. The Pentagon fired back a statement studded with intelli-l gencc estimates on bomber andi missile strength, saying Iho U.S. edge over the Soviet Union is; constantly increasing. Considers Dangerous LeMay was not mentioned in Die statement, but one high of- ficial said McNamara author- ized the statement because he considers it "dangerous to raise any doubts about our strength. "He thinks it would be wrong lo sit by and allow creation of a il is a myth in his judgment that there is any lessening of our the official said. Goldwater long critical of MeNamara for what he consid- ers over-reliance on long-range he would rather trust LeMay "than the political decisions and computer exer- cises of a Robert McNamara." "More In Favor" Meanwhile, a Navy disagree- ment with McNamara Rail-Labor Crisis Yet Unsettled LI5.) Sees Hope To Aver I Strike Nikita Frolics Through Rebuff of Red Chinese THEY'RE OFF The last flock of wild whooping cranes, which winter on the Aransas Wildlife Refuge near Austwell, has stiirted its annual flight to the Blackjack Peninsula in the Great Slave Lake area of Canada. This picture of two whoop- ers was taken recently at the refuge by Luther Goldman of the Interior Department's Fish and Wildlife Service. One of the m a n y dangers en- countered during the annual flights are trigger happy hunters, a constant threat to the rare flock of 32 birds. WASHINGTON (AP) Presi- ,'denl Johnson reported "no scl- 'llement yet" Wednesday in the railroad "labor crisis, 'nut Ihe President said he still hopes for agreement before a nation- wide strike threat resumes next week. Johnson said labor and man- agement negotiators in five days of emergency While House bargaining lalks "have nar- rowed Ihe area of difference on some of the issues." But, he reported: "There is no settlement yet and Ihcre can be no setllcmenl until all is sues are disposed of." Intensive Mediation Johnson said "intensive modi alion" will continue in thc talks ;which he arranged after obtain ing a 15-day strike postpone ment last Friday. The new slrikc deadline is a.m [April 25. A five-man team of mediators headed by Secretary of Labor ;W. Willard Wh'lz is mccling con- itiiuiously with lhc negotiators for five unions and nearly 200 railroads. The While House remained ssilent about the possibility of emergency legislation if Ihe lalks fail, but Johnson indicated he would not let the entire 15- day postponement expire before considering other steps. Hcporl by Weekend "I have asked for a definitive report to me by this the President said, "We should know definitely, not later than next Monday, whether the parties lo Ibis dis- pute will settle it by the process jof bargaining and by responsi- ble Johnson said. "The country expecls [hat an- swer to be yes." he added. j Johnson noted the difficulty of I trying to gain in 15 days wliat LOOK-- Ceremonies Saturday at. 10 a.m. will dedicate 'Goliad Coun- ty's newly remodeled courthouse, re- sult of more than of con- struction during past nine months. Major items in project included hvo- story addition interior re- decorating and installation of heat- ing, cooling and elevator facilities. Landscaping is expected lo be finish- ed prior to dedication, at which Chief Justice Howard P. Green of 1131 h Court of Civil Appeals in Corpus Christ! will deliver main address. (Advocate Photo) r m a A It amara came to 'r I Z S 4- A ,r-J r-i -I ecnmcality Aids Estes Appeal Bid -EL Ji. Donald, chief of naval opera- lions, before a House Appropria- tions subcommittee. McDonald said he disagrees with McNamara's plans to re- duce the present fleet of aircraft carriers. But the admiral added that the Army and Air Force are even more in favor of this cut lhan the McNamara helped me u. ill WjJtlL five years of talks and govern- -----'ment aclion have failed to achieve in the dispute over wage structure, job classifica- tions, and working conditions, Repealed Threats The bitter dispute, which has Hits Policy Of Corps WASHINGTON for- Rioting Students Claim Food Poor MARYVILLE, Mo. (AP) in the downtown Stale highway patrolmen over what they claim is mer Peace Corps volunteer Maryvilfe in force Wcdncs- Iho poor quality of food served Says Mao Covering Up 'Blunders' or Kicc' Is ihe Issue MOSCOW (AP) Soviet Pre- mier Khrushchev says Hcrl China now preaches world rev- olution because Mao Tze-lung and other leaders bungled in trying to solve problems at home. It was Hie first lime, diplo- mats said, Ibal Khrushchev had made an open attack on Mao personally. Peking's policies "have cre- ated serious difficulties for the world cumrmmist movement and placed it on the- verge of a he told a Polish-Soviet friendship meeting Wednesday n the Kremlin. The meeting was an encour- aging one for the premier. Wladyslaw Gomulka, the visit- ing Polish party leader, an- nounced cautious support for Ihe Soviet call for a world Com- munist showdown meeting on Ked China. While backing Mos- cow, Poland has been reported cool toward a showdown meet- ing, fearing an irreparable di- vision of world communism, West Not 'Ulpc1 His voice rising to a shout, Gomulka ridiculed the Chinese for calling the West "a paper j tiger." He declared no "imperi- [alist" country is ripe for revolu- tion, as Peking contends, "least of all the United States." In his address, Khrtishchev scoffed al Red Chinese aspira- than ray colleagues do. ied repeatedly' lo nationwide (visor fordoing litllc but making nu'si' strike threats, has exhausted ostentatious lours al! provisions of present law. j through thc jungle area" of Si- Johnson received oral reportsicrra Leone, lhc West African hv a TvloJfrom lhe mediators, then where he served as a tc.x.s AIMI puson sentence a 1> ei (h nc..teacher and coach. w, T igotiafors before making' his' The former volunteer, Gerald turned down Wednesday a third In effoc he court once briefing Davis of Portland Maine, tr-it'l'f IT v not Peace Corps conviction, hut a tech- Bul presiding .Judge K. from rcporlcrs tors wrongly concentrator! thc sharply adminislra- day lo prevent further student'by thc college, lion of the Peace Corps and ''idling at Northwest Missouri, Forty to _sn highway patrol- said, "Corps policy seems to c lo have no policy." i For He also attacked his M00 students have away in patrolling the town, lolulionary movement t...j I, nlrl nnici' CiClV. .Tnfin A'I TO.'lKnjl A fci'n-i tntl f tllrt tions for leadership of world communism. He said the Chi- nese would like to "become the leaders and mentors of the rev- Asia, but stone-throwing dcm-; Gov. John M. Dalton and Latin America, ilhe patrol into Maryvillo Offcr oniy lit- 1 1> I m T'l' I 1 lhc nf tllc collRKc'stead of economic progress. JLlj 1 J O HOICI "Olp "sccllro lhol 'War or like News Talk Before Goldwater headed for n "Ti ----O- I lUlii 1 UIJU1 ICJ S I IUJ .1 t' "Hon.eys Woncllev reworded.his March II j At ,lis ncws hriefing, Jolmsonicorps !lo appeal again. program on education ______ on Esles'first rehearing said) ..Bolh sidcs arc there instead of on needed California to press his quest for Tiu-' slate's highest criminal motion, thereby allowing Estes thcjr dead-level best to and welfare work Ihe Republican overruled a second request to file another request wilhm IS ;an agreement I am convinced! 1'larnd in lie.cord ushl un a rehearing of its Jan. 15 de- days for a rehearing. asked for istallalion." "They say we are the revl- i Mrs. M. T. Sheldon, head Khrushchev said "But ;ctician al (he college since 1957, wllal ihcjr people want resigned "in view of or rice7 I mink th WASHINGTON Pros- drcumslances" and asked that wiml ident Johnson will hold a ncws he relieved immediately, conference at p.m. CST students who lake most ot thev The Soviet premier, who will 'Ihe 70 Friday, obviously was Thursday in Ihe State Depart- their meals at Ihe cafeteria I mvinn nm ment Auditorium. Members of committees of 15 men fc l'emmk P.rc' .Ihn American Society of News- and IS women for a meeting nomination, he brought up the of that." The own bailiwick. Shouldn't Try He went to the Pentagon for ceremonies honoring Gen. Ben jamin D. Foulois, 84, one of the first military fliers, and told newsmen McNamara should not "continue to try to fool the' American public that we have a: missile system ready to go." Goldwater said he agrees with pared text, he seemed to enjoy scoffing at the Chinese, some- I1 11 The ansioii Plastics ill ltl views of D-ivis were pimor B'lcsls' scheduled by .I. W. Jones, presf- miss "PhoMiiig conviction. The swindling conviction wasT'lSy at a later briefing rte-'Placed in Wednesday's5 "Con- The Soc1i.cly -is !ls llle itislilii-Ijn arlificiafvoicc, sonieUmes Ihe first after Kstes' arrest inclined lo sav whether Johnson'.grcssional Record" by Rep. "'m-.i Cilv olfichk llis tingcr at lile March The collapse of the might ask congress for legisla- Stanley II. Tupper, R-Maine, ?c audlcnce mnlti-milhon-dollar Estes gram tion to settle the dispute if no- enthusiastic Peace Corps CC. ,1 rc.-n-, Is from Zone a p0mt' sand fertiliser empire followed cessary as a last resort. supporter who said, "This young ,triv r mil iriv somi I L-. "niecrs shmi'idi said that the Chi- lho After Johnson's is highly inlelligcnt, very I, ,nu tau? ur> Kslcs, was convicted in Ty- the mediators and negotiator! popular, respected in his com-mi, c m" Credit the struggle of the Social- jler on state charges that he for sides went back intn mmunily, and certainly his ohser- i'st countries and their Comrnu- a farmer to sign 5011 chattel mortgage on existent fertilizer LeMay that the nation needs a'Commi tanks, pen and ink, that the Estes trial was moved "after tllc appellant hange of venue." The words were stricken, state's (See KSTKK, Page Victoria County Airport; Woodlcy, with ------mssion began negotiating soralrhpri mil nin'o m t mixed strategic force "with cm-Jon the lease of the large vacant ioi lc a, nrecedcnLs in phasis on bombers." I hangar at Aloo Field Wednc-s- !ms ear ier 01 inTon The oninio In Ihe California speech, the! day with the Polymer senator added: a now industrial unil in movet "Mr. McNamara knows, and'Vicioria which now has 20 cm- h-id snuuhi' 1 know, and the Soviet Union ploycs and plans lo expand, knows that Ihe ultimate rcliabil- F. T. Welch and J W Ilarl- jly of our inlcrcontinenta! ballis- rell of the Polymoi- Co. lie missiles is based upon theory plained Ihat their unil deals in. not upon practice and not upon imperfect rosins a n d plastic FOR HOPE SCHOOL "T i ,1. materials acquired from I pledge Ihat Ihe immediate j Union Carbide and thc E I) and full restoration of our dc-Ulu Ponl de Nemours and Co fenses would be one of my firstiplanls. reworking these male-! rials for use by (oy manufac- turers and similar operations. The firm now occupies (wo buildings at Foster Field, they said, and is in need of consider-; Dr. Edward R. Annis, prcsi- ably more space in its plans'dent of American Medical As for expansion. The buildings' socialion, whom some Victo at Foster Field would he re-! rians may have seen on thc Today's Chuckle Good breeding is I h a f quality Mini enables n per. .son lo wait in well man- nered silence while lhc louil mouth gels (lie service. j r- i Davis was "an unsatisfied vol. unleer who came home of his; own choice" and had made similar statcmenls last .Mos! Disagree the campaigning scna tor said. AMA President Speaker For Retardation Event home in a peaceful protest. Col- Thc N.ltiona, IcKc officials led them back lo Co the campus spring. s (cm j ,h in Monday night I hey marched 'conference live on both Iclevi- into Ilio downtown area aml advance their raise the living tllc people." csolulc Rebuff ideo- expect the sion blocked tJ.S. 71, causing traff :5lre-Vcl1 spokesman said "We looked Tht, Broadcaslini; Nncks more than three mto what Davis had lo say arid Co win carry u nve r.ldio long. Tuesday night about Pc made some changes, hut the ;md hy fjjm on Vclcvision sludcnls rioted in' thc downtown fr The old Aloo hangar is (Sec K1KM, Page 9) (ained in addition to the ban- "Tonighl" television show a gar at Aloe. few months ago, will be in in Victoria April 24 lo address a special fund-raising luncheon jof the Area Project on Retarda- tion and Hope School. Dr. Annis, who now lives in Miami, Fla., will be in Texas to appear al the annual con- Power Line Burn Victim Improved u Vi Brcin Dunn in the hospital wilh an appendectomy. .Mrs. E. B. Daniel reminding mem- bers of the Study Club of the Rebckah Lodge of a meeting at her home tonight al p.m. Dave McCoy in lown from Port Lavaca on business. I nf (ho Texas Medical Mrs. George Shields and .Mrs. j Anlonio Longoria, Ihe 211-year- Association, in Houston. William Palman of Ganaclo Beeville conslruction worker Proceeds from the sale of itiated into Delta Kappa Gam- who had to have his right fore- lickels for the luncheon will go ma, society for teachers, amputated last establishment of a Austin recenlly, and Mrs. Pat- after a construction project ac- psychiatric testing center, one man receiving an honorary :cidcnl, was reporled "out of .of the primary goals of Ihe membership. W. U. Wednesday at De Tar! Area Project on Retardation, marking a birlhday today. .'Hospital, The project was founded re- Mark Canion also in line for] Longoria suffered multiple'ccntly, as an outgrowth of Vic- hirthday congratulations. .llhirrl degree burns when Ihe toria's Hope School Frank Padillo in lown on busk boom of u drag line brushed to survey tiic needs of and pro- ness. Mrs .Dellon a high-vollage power vide help (or handicapped and and daughters, Gay and line in the 2000 block of Cresl- other disadvantaged children all three home wilh the measlesiwood Drive at Ihe site o( a cily and youth, together. Frank Guillnrd and'drainage project. He was hold- Right counties have been in- his brother-in-law, Dr. Franking on to thc cable of the drag viled to participate with'nil KDWAItl) Wood of Hartford, Conn., inline. Victoria Counly in thc area! Houston on business Dick Despite lhc improvement of project, with costs of various' be credited to those Mulligan glad lo be out on a majority of the volunteers who have served in Sierra Leone don't agree with Davis." In particular, he said, most Peace Corpsmcn there think the emphasis on education is neces- sary before other things can be accomplished. And Davis' comments on the Peace Corps training program 'acking inner discipline conflict wilh Davis' earlier expressed enthusiasm for this program, the spokesman said. Favoritism Charged Davis described one incident at Ihe government school anil by lo p.m. the importance of eco- lo prove thc su- of communism over enterprise, Khrushchev 
                            

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