Tuesday, April 14, 1964

Advocate

Location: Victoria, Texas

Page: 1

Other pages in this edition:

Who (or what) are you looking for?

Find old articles about anyone, in the World’s Largest Newspaper Archive!

Other Newspapers from Victoria, Texas

Loading...

Other Editions from Tuesday, April 14, 1964

Loading...

Text Content of Page 1 of Advocate on Tuesday, April 14, 1964

Advocate (Newspaper) - April 14, 1964, Victoria, Texas THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 118th 340 TELEPHONE HI 5-1451 VICTORIA, TEXAS, TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 1964 Rumor That Nikita Dead Discounted Tass Brands It 'Rubbish' MOSCOW (AP) An un- believed but electrifying rumor (hat Premier Khrushchev was dead set off a mad round of telephone calls in Moscow Mon- day midnight. Tlie rumor was denied as "rubbish" early Tuesday but not before it had swept alarm- ingly around the world. The exilement was primarily among foreign news correspond- ents who were advised by messages from abroad that for- eign agencies not including The Associaled Press had carried the news that the pre- mier was dead. Aslonislied A major part of the trouble was that none of the cor- respondents in Moscow had sent the news. It had been picked up abroad and circulated under foreign datelines. Even the cor- respondents of the agencies that carried it were astonished; they learned the news first on calls frori their own home offices. The reports here were that a German agency and a Japanese agency had circulated the rumor. Correspondents here were highly doubtful of the news, but because of the premier's ad- vancing be 70 Fri- his somewhat strenu- ous life, they knew anything was possible. Makes Speeches Khrushchev had been out on the airfield at midday Monday welcoming Wladyslaw Go- niulka, Polish party leader, and again at night was at a Kremlin party for the premier. He made speeches on both occasions. A major part of the problem in Moscow is that white rumors can get started, it is hard to get them stopped. There is no official agency to call to check such information. The newspapers and the agencies also are hesitant to give a flat reply. Like the foreigners, they also know anything can happen. Finally, The Associated Press reached the director of the So- viet Tass news agency, Dmitri Goryunov, who branded the re- ports as "rubbish." He said he bad seen the premier in good condition at 8 p.m. Moscow time at a Kremlin party. Khruschcv was drinking toasts with Go- mulka, and was apparently in fine fettle. Phnncs Busy As soon as the reports began circulating in Moscow, just about every diplomat in the So- viet capital got telephone calls to ask whether any news had been heard. None of the West- ern diplomats had been invited to the Kremlin party and their only comment was to express astonishment and disbelief. All women voters of the Vic- toria County area are invited to meet Mrs. John B. Connally, the First Lady of Texas, at a tea Tueday afternoon at the Vic- toria Country Club. Victoria is first on the itiner- ary of the governor's wife in a (See today's Editorial Page: 'Texas Neeils John series of appearances she plans to make over the state in ad- vance of the first Democratic primary election May 2. The tea for Mrs. Connally, in which she hopes to greet as many Victoria County women as possible, will be from p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Country Club. Mrs. Kerry McCan is hostess tor the occasion, assisted by Mrs. Zac Lentz, Mrs. R. H. Cory, Mrs. William N. Palman, Mrs. Joe K Kelly, Mrs. Leo Welder, Mrs. Frank H. Grain Jr., Mrs. Oscar Phillips, Mrs. Neil Tafini and Mrs. J. E. Gal- limore. Mrs. Connally will go from Victoria to another reception at Baker upposes Allowable Move GOP Candidate To Speak Here Robert Morris, Republican candidate for United States senator, will speak at noon Tuesday during a campaign luncheon at Totah's Motel Res- taurant. Considered by many a lead- ing authority on communism, he was the first president of the Defenders of American Liberties, a widely acclaimed civil liberties organization. Reservations may he made wilh David Mike Crawford, Morris' local campaign man- ager. James Hunt, Victoria County campaign chairman for a sec- ond term for Gov. John B. Con- nally, anticipating a heavy at- tendance at a "get-oiit-the-vole" breakfast of Connally supporters at 7 this morning at the Navar- ro Restaurant League ol Women Voters being reminded of a mock precinct convention at Hospitality House tonight al X'orvcl McCauley oul early and involved in a sidewalk conversation Delton Ashley all smiles and considering a bright day Tom Ruiz begin- ning his busy week by giving a friend a helping hand Charley Brandos wondering if friends on a ranch at Cheapside have taken to raising copper- heads Leroy Barllet mak- ing an attempt to catch up with current events Boh Hlnes having difficulties with his mode of transportation Mr. and Mrs. Allene Lflssman in their favorite coffee house for a mid-morning break George Sirmon returning a phone call in person the Karl Rydoljihs of Blooming- ton in town to rlo some business and to purchase some baby chicks. Established 1849 VOTERS INVITED Tidal Wash Governor's Wife Ruins Rails In Alaska Due Here Today MRS TOHN luua. JUHIN 12 Cents Additional Damage Likely ANCHORAGE, Alaska Tidal waters on Monday washed out 114 miles of Irack in a sec- tion of the Alaska Railroad which had just been reopened after suffering damage in last rnonlh's earthquake. Water also poured around wa- terfront buildings and covered beach roads in sunken coaslal areas of Ihe earthquake zone, but no other damage was re- ported. The Alaska Steamship Co. said in Seattle that the track washout at Porlage, about 50 miles southeast of Anchorage would delay indefinitely the re- opening of the port of Whitlier. The Alaska steamship vessel Iliamna was diverted to Anchor- age. Quake Areas Fluod 'We anticipate additional tomorrow and Wedncs- Grissom, Rookie Given Nod for Gemini Flight Luiuuiiuw anu svenncs- Corpus Christi, and from there wiln higher a tn n.' .cnnknspnan fnr tVln u to an evening affair in the Rio spokesman for the steamship Grande Valley. On Wednesday company said, she will be greeting women vot- ers in San Antonio. Opp The government-owned Alas- ka Railroad runs from Seward through Whittier and Anchorage to Fairbanks. Portage is a few miles north of Whittier. Flooding of sectors which ap parently dropped from three to six feet in the March 27 quake brought new trouble to Alaskans fighting their way back from the Good Friday devastation. Weather Helped With a slap at incumbent con- Property owners armed them- gressman-at-large Joe Pool, witl1 mops, buckets and voting a pay raise for himself, brooms to rid buildings of wa Robert W. Baker of Houston ter- told Victorians Monday he op- Calm weather was credilec posed any change in the saving the endangere a nnd a very fine academic rec- Moore said. The trustees present voted unanimously to name DuBose; lo a position on the faculty ef- fective in Scplcmber. Moore nlso reported to the board that Architects Ault Rick will call for bids in the near future on remodeling of the men's dormitory for addi- tional classroom space. He said Ihe bids would be presented al the next regular board meeting on May 11. The board gave Moore au- thorization to sell cnfctcria and dormitory fixtures no longer needed by the college. It also authorized the college cost of converting the are a, which is now in grass, nt ap- proximately After approving the election csulls, incumbents Earl Cliburn ind Dr. C. B. Monlier signed the oath of office. Officers wcre then re-elected victoriH offlci H also authorized the college Eiitwbete, PH. president to proceed with plans to two-year terms. They are Winston Zirjacks, president; Dr. Montier, secretary and Fred Proctor, vice-president. Trustees present included Zir- jacks, Dr. Montier, Cliburn, Ger- ald DuBosc nnd Leo Welder. Today's Chuckle A girl doesn't need to be beautiful to win the of a man. Siw cai rich.