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Advocate Newspaper Archive: April 12, 1964 - Page 1

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Publication: Advocate

Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - April 12, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 15 118th 338 TELEPHONE HI 5-1451 VICTORIA, TEXAS, SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 1964 Established 1846 120 Pages THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON March 2, 1964 Dear Morris: It was with great pleasure that I learned from Con- gressman Clark Thompson that The Victoria Advocate is planning to publish its second annual edition of The Victoria Story. Free papers such as yours are an integral part of our democratic way of life, of which the long, eventful life of The Victoria Advocate is a worthy representation. I recall with pride my past association with the people of Victoria, and I commend them on the outstanding growth of their community. With every good personal wish for success, prog- ress, and many more decades of effective reporting and news interpretation. Cotton Farmers Given Four Planting Choices Sincerely, -A. Mr. Morris Roberts Editor and Publisher Victoria Advocate Victoria, Texas Balloting To Open for Pr imanes Absentee voting for the May 2 Democratic and Republican Primaries will get under way Monday and last through April 28. j Voting will be conducted in' the office of County Clerk Val Huvar only during the regular hours of the office, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Present election laws prevent absentee balloting from being held at times other than the office's regular hours, Huvar said. The only method for voting will be in person and by mail. If by mail, the application must be in an envelope post- marked from a point outside the county, Huvar pointed out. It should be accompanied by the voter's poll tax or exemp- tion certificate. The election law also states that persons unable to appear at the office because they are physically disabled or ill, in- cluding pregnancy, must mail their application and a doc- tor's affidavit and poll tax or exemption to the office. The ballot will then be sent to the voter who must return it by mail only. Today's Advocate Relates Victoria's Progress Story This edition of The Victoria Advocate (ells "The Victoria Story" in one of the largest ever published in the news- paper's 118-year history. The second oldest newspaper in Texas, The Advocate, in this edition relates in pictures, stories and advertisements Ihe progress of the city. In six special sections, the areas of government, water projects, schools, medical facilities, women's activities, in- dustry, farm and ranch, and organizations are covered to give Victorians and non-Victorians an over-all look at what goes lo make up the community. This special edition is the regular Sunday paper to subscribers. Persons wishing a second or third copy may purchase them at newsstands Sunday where extra copies will he available, or secure them at The Advocate office Monday at 15 cents each. Orders also will be taken Monday for copies to be mailed away to friends and relatives, with the charge to he 50 cents each which includes wrapping and mailing charges. JRZFLE MISHAP Area Sales Reported Improving First Quarter Gains Noted Sales were steady lo robust in areas ranging from admis- sions lo Ihe city zoo and amusement park to new cars and farm equipment as lhe second quarter of 1964 opened, and businessmen this week generally expressed optimism lhat sales this year may exceed 1963. January and February sales of all makes of new cars were up 25.1 per cent over the same period in IOCS, according to a local automobile dealer. "I can't give you the quar- terly figures, because March isn't in the spokesman said. "But January and Febru- ary were good months." He said that March sales tended lo slow down the pace, however. Exceeded 1963 A farm equipment dealer said that his first-quarter sales exceed the same period in' 1963 by more than al- Ihough 1963 was liio biggesl dollar-volume year in the his- tory of this particular firm. Retail sales inquiries did nol bring forth any superlatives, but spokesmen did express con- fidence in the prospect for a better year in 1964 lhan they had in 1963. "January and February sales were good, but Ihey have dropped off in an ap pliance firm spokesman said. Still, appliance sales for the quarter were rated about even or slightly ahead of the same period in 1903. Oullonk Improved Department store spokesmen reported sales about on a par with the "fair year" of IflfiS, for the first quarter, but cast their eyes optimistically on the improving farm outlook. While equipment sales ap- parently were booming, sales of seed, fertilizer, insecticides and other materials needed by farmers were reported run- ning "about normal." Bui wilh Mill, Export Prices Due alancin Acreae Is Q U E E N OF S II O W Mrs. H. C. Brannies (right) holds the silver Revere Bowl awarded for the entry she and Mrs. E. L. Goetz (center) submitted for First English Lutheran Church in the 1964 Morning Study (AdvociUo I'tmln) Club Flower Show Saturday. Mrs. W. R. McCright, chairman of the show Tor the study club made the presentation for the entry "The Lord is My Shepherd." Religion, Politics Blend Happily in Flower Show Victoria Man Suffers Bullet Wound in Head A Victoria County man who was accidentally shot in his head early Saturday morning vas reported in good condition aturday night after he was aken to John Scaly Hospital in lalveston to undergo surgery or removal of the bullet. Vicente Fuenles, 43, who re- Firefighters Injured DALLAS (AP) Three Navy firefighters were injured, one critically, when their firetruck overturned en route to a plane crash in which no one was hurt Saturday. ides miles was transferred to the Galves- on hospital from Victoria Hos- >ital where he was taken after he shooting incident that oc- curred at a.m. The bullet Winston Low, Dick Thompson Donald Ohrt and Frankic Wil- son, among lhe soft ball enthu- siasts, out early to make room for the new hurricane fence around the CWV Softball Park Mrs. J. B. Wilson an nouncing that the United Church Women will meet with the Catholic Daughters at 8 p.m. Monday at St. Mary's Hall Bloomington PTA members re minded of a meeting Monday p.m. Homemaking Cottage Monte Cuniley now ex periencing lhe chicken pox after his recent recovery from the measles the Oscar Werfe mciers Jr. heading for For O'Connor lo ready the coltag< for the coming season Allan Barlosh and Pete Fore man planning a trip lo Ihi World's Fair Mrs. John Artcro surprised by friends on her birthday Oscar Phillip heading to Marathon to loo over a hunting lease Sam Bailey Hf relating that the new Trail of Six Flags set for th next production will come as surprise to the theater goers. on Stubbs Road seven south of the city limits enlered the right lead and lodged other side. side of against his the Juan fired Vela when Jr. By MARILYN WA1DA Advocate Women's Editor national politics in a miniature niche and a religious Patriotism, a flavor of. thomc were in evidence at the Morning Study Club Flower Show which opened Saturday and will continue through Sunday at the Victoria High School Gymnasium. Mrs. E. L. Goctz and Mrs. H. C. Brnnnics received Cor entering the Queen of the Show arrnngoinr-nl for tChurch in the Church Division. The top winner was cnlillcd The Lord Is My Shepherd" and was developed around sym-i bolic simplicity wilh an asym-' metrical arrangement of yel- low gladioli blossoms, chysan- Unchanged WASHINGTON (AP) Secre- tary of Agriculture Orvillc Free- man announced Saturday provi- sions of a new colton stabiliza- tion program [or as they affect growers and domestic mills. The provisions were drawn in ino with the new wheat-cotton )ill which President Johnson signed. The colton program will re- ain Ihe 1C million acre planting illotmciit established last win- for this year's crop. I.ni'Kc Surpluses r o e r s will have four choices of operations as follows: 1. They can plant within their effective basic planting allot- would include any acreage rc-allouaied to them for allotments surrendered by other growers. These farmers will be eligible for price supports at 30 cents a pound, about 2.5 cents less than last year. 2. Growers can plant within whal is called a domestic allot- nent designed to help to reduce iroduciion at a time when snr- iluscs are large. The domestic illolmcnl will he per cent less than the bnsic that is, their share of the na- tion's 1C million acre allotment. For small farms those of IS acres or less the domestic allotment will be 15 acres or their 1964 basic allotment, thc silver Revere bowl, First English Lutheran Ring As Brazil Picks Chief BRASILIA, Brazil gross efecled Gen. Hiimbcrlo Castello Branco president of Brazil on Saturday. Castello Branco will serve un- til Jan. 31, 1966, when a full- term president is expected lo be .elected. "The agricultural outlook [tc received 351 volcs from a 80 per planted, cent of local crops spokesmen said that normal rainfall this near-drought in a "better than average" yield. ther-in-law, accidentally latter stumbled while crossing a barbed wire fence 85 yards makes better 1964 look like year than a much the joint session of Congress. whichever is smaller. Normal Yield Farmers who plant wilhin (heir domestic allotment will bo eligible for price supports at 30 cents a pound. In addition Ihey will get a government payment of 3.5 cents a pound on the nor- mal yield of their domestic allotment. Thus, such farmers would gel 33.5 cents a pound for _, a normal yield of collon Ibis u f, Morning :10 Ihemums and euonymus, ap-Club Garden Pi gnmage, [o planted pointed with a beige cloth andk'onjunclion with Ihe Three Homes In The annual Garden backdrop, and the figurines oflcr Show, Jesus and two sheep. I homes, include three new, Nazareth Academy, An explanation card with an art exhibit will be porl auolnleni This ent and the veyed here future wilh are the [told The Advocate. Confidence Evident Bankers and brokers re- from the victim's residence. fleeted lhe same healthy opti- Vela M. E. j i Former President Eurico Du- Thorp will be no manager of a department slore.tra lwo aml Chrisli-'cnd nE to God tnld Thfi Advocate. __ i..... lo arrangement featured the dc-'stngcd, and Ihe old grist mill scriplion: "The pasl, lhe pros- at Memorial Square, 400 E. Commerce. Nay.areth Academy pis located at 206 W. Convent, opened blooms and lhe buds with no beginning and no end- ing, Ibc asymmetircitl triangle interprets our subject for t h c Great Shepherd Was, Is and Ever will be in our hearts. 3. Farmers can choose to par- ticipate in what is called an ex- and 
                            

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