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Advocate: Saturday, February 22, 1964 - Page 1

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - February 22, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 118th 288 TELEPHONE HI S-USl Opinions on Truck's Speed Vary in Fatal Crash Trial VICTORIA, TEXAS, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1964 scene Invesjlgalion, said lhat it was his opinion that the truck was operating at a spcecl of be- tween 50 ami 55 miles an hour the 45-mile an hour speed By JAMKS SIMONS Advocalo Stall Writer A slate highway palrolraan testified Friday thai a truck driven by Willie Lee Franklin, 89, of ffouslon, was traveling at a speed of miles an hour when it was involved in n traffic crash last Oct. 17 on Goliad Highway that snuffed out Ihe lives of four prominent Vic- toria women. Patrolman John Rc-nlley ot Port Lavaca derived the speed of the track-trailer from skid marks and, among other factors, Ihe distance Franklin's truck, and a car occupied by the worn-' en traveled after the collision. Franklin's attorney, .lack W. Knight of Houston, lagged Bent- ley's calculation as only "guess p.m. Friday with "more'lesti Work and based Ins argument mony about speed and skid on the that a device in the marks due at 9 a.m. Monday truck used to record thn snpnri mn-i Franklin look the slaticl In his own defense Friday and testified that the speedometer on the truck read a little over 30 miles an hour a short dis- away from the collision Franklin is being tried in point, county court on a charge He said he looked down at negligent homicide in perform- ance of on unlawful act which was filed following investigation of the accident that killed Mrs. Dave Lack, 48, of 1104 E, Trin- ity SI.; Mrs, .lames Wieling, 40 of 2301 Bon Aire St.; Mrs. D.E Purely, 69, of 1505 N. Bridge. St., and Mrs. Reese Jones, VI, of GDI W. Commercial St, County Judge Wayne L. Hart- the speedometer when a car approached the highway from a side road. Franklin, who has driven a truck since 1940 with the ex- ception of between May 5, 1953 until October of 1959 when he! was a deputy for the sheriff's department in Houston, said he owned the truck-tractor he was! driving at the time of (he ncifi- uin-iug at. uiu Liniu tjl itlc man called a week-end recess! crash. He said it was leased to in the trial shortly before 5 international Marketing Corp "m ot Abilene, the company he was driving for. He said he was familiar with [he poinl where lhc accidcnl "i I mm ita UUU ill U d, lU truck used to record the speed, when court reconvenes. [he point where the accident a 35 mi'CSi Knighl hc w111 happened having made many! p-f, r nil r. or exl'crts on lhal sub- through Victoria on his kailici, Patrolman Dalton to the stand Monday morn- routes.. He said he was "dead-: n.eyer, who made the pn-the-ling, The trial started Thursday.l (Sec OPINIONS, Page 10) 2 Jurors Ready For Ruby Trial DALLAS, Tex. (AP) A 39-ycar-okl industrial engineer Friday was selected as the second juror in the murder trial of Jack Ruby. During an ofltimes stormy session, one defense lawyer was threatened K with contempt. The defense vainly sought at one point during the f.t i_ _ Jury Says Rice Must Integrate HOUSTON (AP) A district Established 1849 12 Rapidly Melting Snow Surprises Texas Gulf Area 6 Inches Measured At Austin court jury which included two Negroes returned a verdict Fri Judge's Son fifth day of Ihe trial to bring a lie dectector into court to use on prospective jurors. All Rejected AHen W. McCoy, t father of two daughters, was the I illirt'l I Oil nrl 86th candidate called, and only J-111 the second accepted, during (he trial of Ruby for the slaying Nov. 24 of Lee Harvey Oswald, accused assassin of President John F. Kennedy. day in favor of Rice University trustees who said the school With Bomb Three prospects were called after McCoy's acceptance and nil were rejected before Ihe tri- al recessed overnight. One was the first Negro candidate, a must be integrated and charge' DISTRICT SWEETHEART Louis HajeCpresi-' dent of LaBahia Chapter, Future Farmers of Ameri- ca, presents a bouquet of roses to Miss Brenda Dumas of Port Lavaca after she was elected dis- trict sweetheart at the annual FFA Banquet Thurs- day night at Victoria High School. Miss Dumas, 17, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. N. Dumas of Port Lavaca and senior at Calhoun High School, was elected over 11 other chapter sweethearts, al- though five ballots were required. tuition if it is to become a first class iinsUution. The jury of seven men and five women favored the trustees j on six of the eight issues sub- mitletl in Judge William Hoi land's district court. Judge Holland said he irule on the basis of the jury's whether Rice can, in U.S. Stationing in Spain MADRID (AP) Spain's Fidel Castro's Cuba, DALLAS, Tex. Justic of Ihe Peace Joe B. Brown whose father is presiding over Hail Creels Laredo Fcle WHOSE BIRTHDAY? Snow Flakes Off Schedule V i c t o r i a's iiame-droppingi A high ground temperature weather did il again Friday, Ihe snow melting as it fell, slightly off-schedule: It snowed! Advocate Staffer E. I. (Sticks) (Officially, the day before GeorgejSfahala, who drove in from Yoa- surprising storm birthday. jkum at mid-morning, reported through West and The last three snowfalls urUie heaviest fall was observed By TIIK ASSOCIATED PRESS A snow Texas to Ihe Gulf Grande Friday. Highways over a large area were iced and dangerous most of the day. A collision on iced roads east of Alpine resulted in ____ ._.... a snoH- Friday between caught between a sur- Pidcoke, west of Ft. Hood a.m., and a heavienface cold front and ''a cold Central Texas, had inchesi'all was observed later a'oft" brought about the of snow on the ground at 8 a.m., a and a.m. within the according to the All ot Friday's fall was light] Weather Bureau. The surface and mushy, however, and moved through about sun- ionly collections observed wereirise, dropping the temperature i (See FLAKES. Page 7) u jflat nuL-f uruie neaviest tau was ooserved and Rio Victoria all came on the dot on'al the county line where traffic Feb. 12, Abraham Lincoln s'was slowed and m o tor i sts birthday. That was in 1958, 1060 turned on their car lights. and again in 190S. i Snow also fell at Cuero and The U.S. Weather Bureau atjYoakum. Foster Field recorded a A combination of available the heaviest amount reported. First Since 1919 Austin, with six inches at var-1 ;-----r.y1'" ious points, had its first windshields, snow since 1949. The thick snow in and around Austin closed at least a dozen schools. Some snow mixed with rain; surprised Corpus Christ! and Galveston, which had the first snow in four years. It snowed rather hard in downtown Hous- ton and throughout the Houston Ruling Awaited On Redistricting itj.imuings wnetncr nice can, in a Fidel Castro s Cuba, ton anu throughout the Houston fact admit Negroes and charge formation minister sairt Satur- Fraga Iribarne declared that area, but lhe sluff melted swift- AUSTIN (AP) Gcv John mart of rtfHaios ihof The judges said it may day the government was fully Spain was stauncniv Laredo was bombarded Friday he has'wai and see tlieir nlngs" Communist, it had a special re- ..hailstorm at dawn, a no plans on what aclion! He retted to lhe Jack said Friday woman who was disqualified be- Police and cause she opposed capital pun-jbomb in lhc Ishment. [lhe Oak Cliff Tha special weekend session {west Dallas was called to try to speed things up. Sworn In limncdiiilcly McCoy was sworn in irnme- arra Jn Dallas Countv Hec- riialcly and laken lo Ihe Building where Ruby is be- floor of Ihe courthouse lo join In8 was in recess Max Causey, 35, an electronics luncheon. Nothing was i ee or possy a mon rme aou pans o before he renders a judgment, jfoase Polaris submarines in this said he did not expect the Unit- we pan was sauncy an-- omare said Friday he has Communist, it had a special re-ja hailstorm at dawn, a preludcimade no plans on what action lationship with its former to the border city's Washington Texas will lake if the U.S. Su- mlnnips in T.nlin Birthdav C-plehrnHfm tlm colonies in Latin 'a. consider that political re-i Birthday celebration. cannot interfere fl what action! He referred to of a Houston federal c o u r t's preme Court orders the state's ruling that the state reflistrict utuurs tne stales runng mat tne stale reoistrict Beaumont, Orange antl Perl 23 congressmen to rim at large, or face at large congressional rthur also saw unaccustomed rnnnallv tnu The Supreme Court held engineer, who was seleclcd Thursday as Ihe firsl juror. Ruby was said lo have con- curred in (he choice of McCoy BS he did in that of Causey. He was quoted as snj'ing of McCoy: "1 like fine man." Ruby, 52, was closeled in the courtroom with his lawyers for 15 minutes before (he afternoon urown holds court. Sheriff's of- Attorneys for the Males to cut olf aid because] ficers also made a rapid check opposing the trustees petilionjof sPain's trade with Prime! of the downtown cnurtrnnm are oxnnrtpH In n GOP Names o Women found. Mumbling Voice The younger Brown, accom- panied by his father during a recess in the Ruby trial, told newsmen the call came to his office at p.m. Mildred Polk, a clerk in Ihe younger Brown's court, said she answered the phone call. "A voice mumbled something session. Newsmen and specta-i voiee "'unibled something Favors Trustees tors were barred. asked m'm !o repeat One of the lawyers said sanl- "Then said that was upset and askcti for the ere was a homb in the court- conference. house. I asked him if he meant Burden On Kin n C, courthouse or the u.tcnueu mai me mistees The defense source added- a he develop a "first class school." "lie was almost incoherent.' cL -fin ,i 2'. Thls was Rice's He was on some kick lhc spoke wilh mam purpose. there being enough trouble ini ,y cent she cmlld not 3- Race restrictions on admit- Ihe world that he should make cn d Connally told a news ience tie doesn't think m a Georgia case that on. !saiu nui not expect me unit- meeting Attorneys for the to cut olt a.ict beca.uselnight v -u.u uin_i; tit; uucbll v I II 1 n K of lhe same he San Antonio Covered should try to anlicipale districts must newsmen after a Cabinet! Two inches of snow in San An-1 the courts will do Thebctter. ba made as nearly equal in pop- aftaj- tonlo whilpnpd varHc li-coc -_ which ended after mid- are expected lo file a motion asking the judge to ignore the' jury findings. i The Rice trustees sought a re-' interpretation of an J891 inden-i turo in the estate of William; Marsh Rice, founder of the uni-j versity. The indenture said the school should admit only while shidenls and lhat tuition should be free. The iutervenors, former stu- dents Val Billups and John Cof- fee, said the indenture should remain as it was intended, As for basing nuclear subs at the Spanish port of Rota, the in- formation minister said, "We have been in conversation with the United States for some lime Tile jury favored lhe trustees by finding that: 1. Rice, in setting up inden- tures which created the univer- sity, intended that lhe trustees Two new olficers of lhe Vic- toria County Republican organ- naval ization were named Friday by p ''I ,lhe .legislature attempts 1B- and Spain maintains its desire miles southwest of: Dr. U. B. Ogden, who prac- districting m regular sessions. to collaborate." i .an Anlonio, had its first snow ticed medicine in Victoria in don't know if it would hava m.inc. Chairman Dean Truman. Truman said that Mrs...... Knebel has accepted appoint- ment as county vice-chariman, while Mrs. J. Q. Vardaman will serve as executive secretary. "I think thai all women voters have (lie responsibility for keep- ing themselves informed on politics and taking an active in tlie party of their Rota 'ul more, and that he was a burden on his brothers and sisler." However, Hiiby appeared composed when lhc afternoon! session started. McCoy Icslificd under tlcfensc questioning that while he was not against imposing the death sentence on a convicted crimi- nal, it wmiM he h.icd deri- sion In make." A.skrd iintlrr tlefpjisc fjucMion- (Spe .IUHOHS, Piigr 7) Mrs. Polk said she immedi- ately informed Justice of the Bvn- was h He said he suspected "les have been misdirected and actually intend- ed for- his father. lance render "impracticable" the development of Hice as a first class school. 4. Failure to charge tuilion renders impracticable develop- ment of Rice as a first class school. 5. Under present conditions iljof Morning Sludy Club (Sen JilCE, Page 10) lothcr civic groups. cepting the appointment. A resident of Victoria for the past .10 years, Mrs. Knebel is the mother of one child and has been active in Beta Sigma Phi and Girl Scouting. Mrs. Vardaman, a resident here for about nine years, has T7, V I T lonio whitened yards, trees andj- roofs and closed expressways; where bridges were iced. San' Antonio had 32 degree weather. _Snow also was reported at Del Kio, Uvalde, Pearsall and guin. j Pearsall, 50 miles southwest of i Dr. U. B. VlCtllll ulation as possible. Connally also expressed doubt about attempts by three Texas congressmen to pass legisla- tion requiring retention of exist- ing congressional districts un- coaorae. Use of thp ioint U 1 Tnis wide- the early 1940s, and Mrs.iany Connally said. lSprC rams over the dry were killed Thursday the only apparent way ing up lo an airplane crash in accomplish their goal would le __ hp nh a 1 and air base as headouarters da Mediterranean-based missile- firing submarines had been un- der discussion for months. But no formal announcement was made until a naval spokesman in the Holy Loch Polaris trans- fer of the submarine tender Proteus to Rota. Spanish and American quar- ters here were puzzled as lo why the announcement came, not from the Spanish or Ameri- measuring 1.20 inches. Dilley, 15 miles south of Pcarsall, and Cotulla, 65 miles north of Laredo, also had snow. General Ilains South Texas had genera! rains, but usually less than an inch. All roads in Texas were open, but those over a vast area were iced and dangerous during the morning. These included roads in the districts of Odessa, Lub- bock, Austin, Bryan, Del Rio and San Antonio. anu oau can government, but from the! The Hiehwav Di-nnrtmoni relatively remote U.S. base in road exofc d Scotland. Officials at Rota confirmed the Proteus was en route there from Scotland, and probably road icing was expected to clear before nightfall in the San An- (Sce SNOW. Page 10) arrive Monday. Slaff members of Ihe submarine nua mernbers of Ihe submarim children and is a member squadron alreartv are in of Morin Slu I Editorial by School Girl Va I ley Fo rge A wa rd Today's Chuckle anci Gen. Francisco Franco's Cab- inet discussed the development Friday in the context ol diplo- matic discussions now going on1 in Washington. These concern U.S. insistence, under the latest aid law, Dial Spain curb ils air and sea commerce wilh Castro Cuba, a step which this regime has refused to do. Gossip: Letting the ehnt out of lhc bag. t Mexico. GTS, 1 a he through a constituional Hurley Funeral Home in'siblc. Pleasanton said that arranged State Rep. Horace Houston, menls were being made through1 Dallas, a Republican seeking the Mexican consulate in San ibis party's nomination for lieu- Antonio for the return of the tenant governor, urged Connal- bodies, but added that it "prob- '.v in a letter not to "dignify any ably will be four or five decree of the before they are returned "and Supreme Court dealing funeral arrangements made congressional reapportion- ofcoria i ,soandda ,byit litta I a son and daughter, Sandra cause the constitution gives and Jerry, who hve in Pleasan- lhe rignl to them. (selves. Freedom (ions antl schools in Texas by Johnson Says Communist Civil War Is Spreading PALM SPRINGS, Calif hands, embraces left arm around the former -President Johnson said Fri- and wide grins. Eisenhower had president's shoulder All three flay lhat Incre is spreading a warm greeting loo, for John- smiled and chatted amia- civil war among and the latter threw his bly before going into the Eisen- and w'arned Hen China it is em------------- on a deeply I'ogue reporting he approves of Friday's weather M r s. Cnllie Maker preparing lo ccle- brale her Both birthday Sunday Knlph IIoK. sophomore at SI. Mary's University, motoring Accorded Honors By Freedom Foundation VALLEY FORGE, Pa. (AP) H. Glenn Jr., the Ma- in for Die weekend and report- rine astronaut who now seeks ing enough snow (here lo hccomc a US senator Fri COI -inner of Foumlalion's high wilhonl the grocery shopping lh? inspiration Charlie Klynn "s receiving congratulations from m and raan- frientls on his new fancy auto- mobile Albert Bcsjdcs G'onn. will gel Mnrcharl expecting n busy day Washington Mrs. Gertru.lc Field off lhc. honored San Antonio to be with I--'922 olhcr o enjoy !c Washington's hiiilidny. of the Ame a, ay Lanris Norstead, retired Air Force general who once com- mantlcti Norlh Atlantic Treaty Organization forces in Europe, was hailed as an "ambassador of freedom for the U.S.A." and given a special freedom leader- ship award. He was cited par- licularly "for developing sen- tineled solidarity among our Western Allies for the protec- tion of free men and nations." National recognition awards were awarded to Ihree women and two men who, the founda- tion said, "have shown resolute- ness of personal faith antl char- acter, craitiveness nf mlnti and (See GLENN, Page 7) Government.' Object of the foundation's an-! nual awards program is to honor citizens for outstanding efforts to improve public under- standing and appreciation of the basic cons tit ul ion at righls, free- doms antl corresponding respon- sibililics inherent in the Amer- ican way of life, through the tilings they write, do or say. There two divisions of awards national antl school. School awards and high school editorial awards are made to public, private and parochial elementary .schools, high schools and school systems for excep- tional programs on leaching the fundamentals of the Amer- ican system. Awards to schools include lhe Principal School Awards, consisting of an ex- pense paid trip to Valley Forge antl Washington, D. C., and the George Washington Honor Medals. Ed Sycrs, in Ids "Off Ihe Beaten Trail" on The Ad- vocate's Sunday editorial page, tells the story of Goliad as a cradle of hero- ism going back fo tlie time of Augustus W. Magee, Col Henry Perry, Or, James Long, Ben Milam, Col. James W. Kannin, antl, finally, Gen. Ignacio tfara- a native of Goliatl who led (he. Mexican army lo victory over the French in- vaders at Puchla on Cinto ilc Mnyn, 1852. In Sunday's Fun Maga- zine section, lhc firsl an- nual .speech tournament at Goliad High School Is fea- tured. More than 200 con- Icslants from South Texas high schools nrc ex pec led lo participate in the Iwo-clny conlcst and will be him sod in the hompn of C.olJad reildenli. many The President said this coim-J jsigns that he and Mateos try has troubles but "larger Freeze early Saturday morn-iliad discussed slill another pres- Ihan the troubles I have noted ing. Clear (o partly cloudy Gen. Charles de Gaulle of is lhe spreading civil war among urday through Sunday. A lil-jFrance. The United Stales has Communists." itle warmer Saturday afternoon made no secret of iis dislike for The President did not n'8nt- Northerly winds at De Gaulle's diplomatic recogni- rate. He said: "There is no pan-j 10 lo 20 ro.p.h. Expected Sat- lion of China's Communist re- ic on our agenda." jurday temperalures President Adolfo Lopez Ma-'h'8h 55' in a few wecks> Ue leos of Mexico, Johnson's week-' SouUl Central Texas: Clear be visiting Mexico. end guest, said it is up to s h'tlle warm-; Johnson welcomed Lopez Ma- it is up to coilly an< s lle warm-; onson wecome opez a- world's wise men to "abolish Saturday and Sunday except teas to this country in cere- cold war." jincreasing cloudiness in west monies at Los Angeles Interna- Angeles and spoke in turn. Afterward they flew Springs to confer, then took a helicopter trip after sunset to visit urn" :markcd in Spanish: "If 1 had p I Precipitation Friday: .26. To- remembered you were so tall r lal precipitation for year to'''d have brought my high 1 IOOH 3 t cfi Eisenhower at his golf club vacation homo at Palm Ueserl, 15 miles away. Eisenhower had date: 3.52. heels." L a v a c a-P o r t At Die university, the tiro ap- a.m. High nl p m. Iporary outdoor stadium on the in. iiiijii HL tin p m. ipvjiuij uiuuuut stuumm un me Barometric Pressure at s e a'nthletic field. Bleachers and level: 30.26. rjisennower had met i 7 Malcos before iisl al Sllnscl Satllrday; s crowd estimated at M.COO. maicos ociorc, jusv as Jplinsonirisn 7.m Each snnkp had. Elsenhower and Mateos exchangerl visits in 1959. Friday night they met wilh ThM information baECd on data from U.S Victoria OHlce Wcathtr Bureau (lit WtUHtr Illtwbttl, II) (chairs were packed with a Each spoke of Mexican- American friendship. Strong now, it has been strained In the past.   

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