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Advocate Newspaper Archive: February 13, 1964 - Page 1

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Publication: Advocate

Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - February 13, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 118th 279 TELEPHONE HI I-USI VICTORIA, TEXAS, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1964 Established 1SJ6 U.S., Home Disagree on Cuba Trade British Eager For Market WASHINGTON (AP) Presi dent Johnson and British Prime Minister Sir Alec Douglas-Home opened a two-day exploration of world issues Wednesday and quickly ended up in opposing camps on curtailing trade with Communist Cuba. Diplomatic informants, re- porting this, said Sir Alec made it clear Britain has no intention of joining the United Stales in holding down commerce in non- slralegic goods with Cuba. Johnson, (lie informants said, forcefully restated the U.S. posi tion that the Western Allies must find B formula harmonizing their altitudes toward Ihe Com- munist world. Stands Differ The differing stands on Cuba were no surprise and the two heads of government quickly agreed on the need to continue and speed tip efforts lo reach agreement with the Soviet Un- ion on the central issues oi Germany and Berlin, the in- formants said. Instructions were Issued lo seek a new Western approach. Officially, Johnson and Dong las-Home were reported to have dug into (he problems of Cyprus Southeast Asia, Cuba and East- Wcsl relations. Pierre Salinger, White House press secretary, singled ou those subjects as among the ones dealt with by the two heads of government, but disclosed no details. Honor Lincoln Johnson and the prime minis talked alone about 45 min utes in the President's offio and moved to the larger Cabi net room for an additional 1 minutes wiih advisers. Then they went to the Lincoln Memo rial where each placed a wreali before the stalue o( Abraham Lincoln, honoring his 1551 birlhday. Douglas-Home flew into snowy Washington after three days o lalks in Canada and was lifle by helicopler from Andrews Al Force Base tn suburban Mary land to the White House for for mal arrival ceremonies. Johnson, without a hal or top eoat in below-freezing weather TO RECEIVE MEDALLION 28 Cents By HOY GRIMES Advocate Staff Wriler Tho old ranch house at Nurs- ry which will receive lls his- oric building medallion Sunday rom the Texas Slate Historical iurvey Commitlce used to be lescribed as the "model baehe- or home" of William Henry  ld Nursery ranch home. For a "model bachelor home' here always seemed to be a Kyle Home Site Symbol Of Pioneering Victoria considerable number of children playing around Ihe environs of: the old Kyle raneh house. That was because Major Kyle, not long after he built the home in the early 1870's brought his nephew, John Kyle, with the nephew's wife and five children, down from war-ravaged Virginia to live with him in the produc- tive valley of the Guadalupe. One of these children became Dr. J. Allen Kyle, a Houston physician and surgeon of na- tional reputation. Dr. Kyle has been dead for some 12 years, but his widow will be on hand Sunday (o receive the hisloric building medallion (rom the hands of George W. Hill, execu- tive director of the Texas State Historical Survey Committee. Dr. Kyle's son, William A. Kyle, and his family now occupy (he old home. Not much more than a stone's throw away at Nursery is an- other ranch house marked by one ol the state's medallions. This is the old Carpenter house which became the ranch home of Mr. and Mrs. William M. Murphy Sr., built about 1895. The Kyle house is perhaps a quarter of a century older than this other Nursery landmark, and will receive the fifteenth medallion placed in Victoria County. The bestowal of the slate medallion on the Kyle house will be one of Ihe high lights of a regional meeting called for Sunday in Victoria by the Tex- as Slate Historical Survey Com- millee through its president, former Atty. Gen. John Ben Shepperd of Odessa. Another feature of the region- al meeting will be Ihe formal dedication of a marker placed (See HOME, Page 7A) Candidate To Leave Senate Race Boys Find Dynamite CAPE KENNEDY. Fla. (AP) Four boys walking along a Floricln liasl Coast main line railroad track Wednesday night discovered slicks of dynamite hooked lo the track and disman- tled the wires just minutes before a freight train passed over, police reported. Criminal agent Lcit Lar- son of Ihe Brcvard County sheriff's office reported the dynamite was electrically wired lo the (rack and would have exploded ft (he engine had contacted the wire. The train conlinucd on lls northward journey, unaware of its close call. It was Ihe latest incident (luring a year-long strike against the railroad. Physician Named In Suit Frederick T. (Ted) Shields, a local physician, was named Wednesday in an law- suil filed in District Court in connection with a Jan. 25 traffic crash on North Main Streel. The civil aclipn was brought against Dr. Shields by Frank P. Kelso, 54, of 1602 Crockett Ave., who, according to his court petition, is still hospital- ized with injuries allegedly sus- tained in the collision. A charge of aggravated as- saull wilh a motor vehicle filed jagains'. Dr. Shields is pending on Ihe county court docket. The charge was filed by police fol- lowing their investigation of the accident. In the civil case, Keiso al- eges (hat the collision was brought about solely by negti- ;ence on the part of Dr. Shields. He says the front of a car allegedly driven by the physi- cian struck the rear of his car causing the gas tank of his car to explode and causing the en- lire vehicle to burst inlo flames. The plaintiff states that he suf- fered severe burns on his head, face and right hand as well as internal injuries and numerous Commissioners Praised By Jayeees for Grant The official board and gen- eral membership of Victoria and Mrs. Johnson greeted chamber of Commerce prime mmisler and his wife asjwenl on record Wednesday wilh Ihey stepped onto Ihe While] House south lawn. Mrs, Johnson1 gave Lady Douglas-Home a bou- quet of red roses. Strong Ties Then Johnson, speaking at the north portico of the White House, recalled the tradition of mcelings between American presidents and British prime ministers that began with Sir Winston Churchill. "During Ihesc years we have had our Johnson Raid, "but these have passed as two brothers whose ties are too strong ever to break." Douglas-Homo, noting the im- (.See CASTRO, Page 7A) a resolution commending the Victoria County Commissioners Court for its interest in and support of Ihe annual 4-H-FFA livestock show, as well as for- mally accepting a con- tribution which Ihe court had authorized on Monday. President James Cumlcy, who Tuesday had said his first knowledge of the grant came through a newspaper article, issued the following statement Wednesday: "It is with the greatest of GOP Candidate In Town Today To Tell About Tacts' Later DALLAS (AP) John Van Cronkhile said Wednesday he intended to withdraw as a can- didate for U.S. senator from Texas in the Democratic pri- mary. "I have to make some ar- he said, "but i definitely intend lo get out ol the race." Van Cronkhite, a Dallas pub lie relations man, announced in October that he would oppose Sen. Ralph Yarborough, D-Tcx. "or the Democratic nomination. No One Asked Him In a statement delivered Ic Dallas news media Van Cronk lite said: "When I announced as a can diriate for the U.S. Senate, made it clear that no one hat asked me to be a candidate and there was no public clamor in my behalf. "I wanted to be a candidate 1 wanted an opportunity to serve Texas and I wanted to replac Sen. Ralph Yarborough. Conse quenlly, I presume there will b no undue commotion should decide to withdraw as a can didate. Many Pressures "There are many pressures- unbelievable pressures. Ther are political facts that need I be told. "As soon as 1 can secure ap propriate television time, I wi make this decision official i such a way thai all Texans ma know what is going on within and behind Texas politics." Van Cronkhite would not elai orafe. Defense Charges Plotting to Cheat Ruby of Justice To Know' Another candidate (or th Yarborough post, Robert Morr of Dallas, said he felt "thai th contusions, lacerations and ab-i people have a right to know rasions. He further says that the )v complete extent of .his injuries is as yet not known. The amount asked by Kelso includes ?500 damage alleged- lo tell the voters of Texas." "If he is no longer lo be a Morris continued, "I hope that the mass communi- cation media will give him an opportunity to tell his story." Close Race pleasure that 1 pass on thi resolution in the name of the Victoria Junior Chamber of Commerce. "it is unfortunate thai some people inlerpreled my decision lo present the court's offer to mouth.' This was certainly not my intention. It is not a normal situation when the Jayeees re- ceive out of the blue and since there was some discus- sion as to how much of the building we could enclose wilh- oul violaling local ordinance, I (elt (hat (he Jaycec board should decide how the money was to be used. "I still feel lhat way and, when this board and the direc- tors of Ihe livestock show have ly sustained lo his car. In another case in which pap- ers were on file Wednesday in Dist. Clerk Pearl Staples' office, the law firm of Kelly, H u n t, Cullen and Mallette is seeking JTTV recovery of which it I" OJ' OVei'llOl' is owed by Mrs. T. C. Cage ofj San Antonio for services alleg- A Ivarl cdly rendered by the law firm. ARLINGTON, Tex. 'real horse race" between Gov. John Connally and Liberal Dem ocrut Don Yarborough in the party primary was predicted Wednesday by a top leader in the Texas AFL-CIO. Roy R. Evans, secretary (reasurer of (he state organize tion, also predicted that dele gales to a slale meeling of the Commitee on Political Eduea tion (COPE) would approve a resolution criticizing the gover (Advocate Photo) RETIRING SOON M. G. Cornelius of Yoakum, district engineer for the Texas Highway Depart- ment, has announced he will retire March 1. He stands by a map of District 13, which illustrates road improvements in his nine counties. Engineer Ending Highway Career J. A. Hunt, R. D. Cullen, W. B. Malletle and J. E. Kelly allege lhal between November the Jaycee board of directors of 1961 and Feb. 15, 1962, they as 'looking a gift liorse in the By BEN PRAUSE Advocate Cuero Bureau YOAKUM M. G. Cornelius, district engineer of the Texas Highway Department since 1950, vill retire March 1. His suc- cessor is due to be announced consulted with Mrs. Cage and representatives and wilh other members of her family in re- gard to her business and posi- lion in connection with the es- tate of T. C. Cage and with the business in which her husband was engaged. The plaintiffs stale lhat they have been unable at (heir re- quesls to collect the plus i Mnn-k candidate' for an opportunity to study lawsuit, l Moms, canaiciaic 01 interest from March 10, 1962, of Evans' opinion, only 20 pel six per cent. An additional cent at most of Ihe approxi is being sought to cover legal malely 500 persons attending expenses in connection with the sessions at the Inn of (he Si. Ihe Republican nomination lor the needs of the present facili-f U S Sena or rim will come appear in behal! of His recommendations de- A Thm-crlav signed to make every penny go ioon. Cornelius, who resides in J.S. Highway 90, is a nalional lighway project that will event- ually include miles of super roads. Work is due lo be completed in 1972, Cornelius aid. Counties in District 13 through which the highway wil Story About VIeclie Exam Impugned Newsman Says Source Reliable DALLAS Ruby's defense chief repeated Wednes- day night a charge that there is i high-level conspiracy in Dal- as to cheat Jack Ruby of jus- tice. Attorney Melvin Belli said a newspaper story about a brain test performed on Ruby was part of the plot and called the slory a "deliberale lie." Reliable Source The reporter who wrote the slory, Carl Freund of the Dallas Morning News, said he obtained the the lest showed no important damage to Ruby's a usually reliable source. He added that he would be glad to publish a story on Belli's knowledge of the results of the lest on Ruby. The hearing on a motion lo transfer the trial of Ruby, killer of President John F. Kennedy's accused assassin, was recessed at p.m. until a.m. (CST) Thursday. The attorneys agreed to be in court at 8 a.m. o go over documenlary evi- dence to be introduced. Belli said he would wind up defense testimony "after two or three hours." No Stale Witness Asst. Disl. Atty. Bill Alexan- der said the stale had no plans to call any witnesses. Earlier, Belli charged that a public relations firm helping the judge in Ihe Ruby murder case was part o! what he called a plot by Dallas' "oligarchy" to deprive Ruby of a fair trial. didacy at a luncheon Thursday at Continental Inn. as far as possible." Mrs. E. C. Feller moving back lo Victoria from Edna after a 28 day absence Mrs. .1. 0. Moore interested homcmakers of (he Hosts for the luncheon will bej. The funds had been requested Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Dunn! the Dosing the of Victoria. Morris, former chief counsel lce.- the Senate Internal Security fh 'Sub-Committee, also will appear s. ol "c'at a coffee in his honor in Re- city and out of school jo at pm of the registration for Clothing Workshop Feb. 7 p.m.....Tnhnny Larson step- ping out on the street at 12 noon and looking hungry The Don S. Vaughans back from a Veteran's of Foreign Wars Post and Auxiliary Dis- Feel R. F. Tally No. I, a Wood Hi wildcat being drilled by Am- erada Petroleum Corp. of Hous. trict 10 convention in Krccportilon, has passed the depth of ils Mrs. Jnc l.oos and hcrjoriginal permit. mother, Mrs. Klvic Panlcy of Edinburg in town on a shopping tour Frank Huhler not a bil bothered about the windyjmonlhs ago on weather hut Mrs. Vrlsir.'pcrmit. Clcgfi ready for warm sunshine II is drilling below feet on its present permit. Drilling first began several a foot Judy Ohrt taking her noon hour to accom- plish some errands William II. Miller cclobralinfi his B3rd birlhday Klla Mae Qnche admitting lo a birlhday Ihis snriiiK and The well is being drilled by a stem powered rig nine miles southeast of Victoria. week and Ihe A n il r c w Christos marking n wedding anniversary Hoi) Hines de- ciding to sctllc for a bargain Mrs. hurrying for Hazel Campbell Builder Sludy Class Planned School officials and; represent alivcs of tho home building in rluslry from wide areas of the state meet in Victoria Thursday to discuss a proposec fiulhrie Sklar in town Ren liilters- I" a lale luncheon u-aining program tha could provide much-needed spec ialisls for home builders. The meeting will be held a p.m. al Ray Wilson's Res (aiiranl. Basically, Hie program vvouli provide training for student dale on business kamp absorbing well meanl humor with a smile Dick Cory having three splinters of glass removed from left eye after occupant in passing car unloaded botllc lhat knocked who intend lo pursue ir onl his car windshield Jimmy Mlorl, president of St. Joseph Falhers Club, re- minding members of Thursday's 8 p.m. meeling Rl Ihe s c h o o 1 cnfclcria. (he industry. Some of the train ing would come from the homi builders themselves, who wouli volunteer Ihcir services as gucs lecturers and in other capac it IPS. outh end of the exhibit barn (Set GRANT, Page 7A) Flags are favorable to Connally Candidates for statewide of- Fidel Turns 011 on the Democratic ticket WASHINGTON (AP) The Cubans turned on Ihe water Tuesday in pipes leading lo state (heir positions on issues at the COPE sessions Thursday. Delegales then will vote on Yoakum, which is headquarters of District 13, began his career wilh the Texas Highway De- partment in 1919 as a rodman and draftsman at Snyder. After serving at Corpus Kenedy, Alice and Vic- toria, he moved to the Amarillo district in 1932 for a ten-year stay as office engineer and] resident engineer. From 1942 io 1950, he served in Ihe Hous- ton district as senior resident engineer and district construc- tion engineer. It was from this post that he was promoted to district engineer 14 years ago. The nine counties in Cornel- ius' district arc Calhoim, Colo- rado, DeWitt, Fayetle, Gonzal- es, Jackson, Lavaca, Victoria and Wharton. New highway construction in the district since 1950 totals Dass, are Colorado, Fayeltc Sam R. Bloom, head of the Gonzales. Towns on the roule firm, said he had volunteered to are Columbus, Weimar, Schul- help Ihe judge arrange facilities for news coverage of the case. He said no one asked him lo do il and he had not discussed his work with anyone but Ihe judge and the press. Most Say 'No' The testimony came in (he third day of the defense's effort lo win a transfer of Rubv's trial enburg, Flalonia and Waelder. Cornelius said the seclion of (See ENGINEER, Page OA) Makarios Rejeels New Pcaee Offer Guantanamo, but the Navy said'which candidate, if any. to rec- the base kept its valves elosedlommcnd for support of organ- and accepted no delivery. lized labor. Guantanamo Dependents All To Be Shipped Home WASHINGTON (AP) The Jniterl States is going to turn he Guantanamo Naval Base nto a slrictly military garrison vith no wives, children or other lependcnts. The Defense Department said Vednesday that families will be vilhdrawn gradually over Ihe next Iwo years in line wilh 'residenl Johnson's decision lo nit the Cuban base on a self- sufficient footing. "Dependents now on station vill be returned to Ihe United Slates at the normal expiration of their sponsors' regular tours of Assl. Secretary of De- fense Arthur Sylvester said. "Since all military lours pros endy are for a period of Iwo years, and no extensions wilt be granted lo persons with depend cnts on station, there will prob ably be no dcpendcnls remain ing on Ihe base by early 1966.' No more families cither o military personnel or of civilian employes will be senl to Ih base, which is now under forcec wafer rationing as n result o Prime Minister Fidel Caslro1 THE WEATI-IER order cutting off supply. Ihe norms The water allowance for lO.riOO people on the and Marine personnel, civillai r vorkers, and their vas reduced to one-fourth of Ihe isual supply after last Thurs- lay's shut-off. lurned down new British- American plan for stationing an international peace-keeping force on Cyprus, an authorita- tive Greek Cypriot source said Wednesday night. Fighting raged in the island's Harvey Oswald, The U.S. attorney for the northern district of Texas testi- fied he thought it would be pos- sible to find an impartial jury here, second largest city, the south] US So did Bloom and a Ford Mo- coasl uorl of Limassol while-lor executive. But all other Undersecretary of State] e W. Ball talked they thought it would be leaders of the feuding Greek 'f not miles. Included are 25 and Turkish-speaking factions. Bel1' demanded that Freund miles of U.S. and slale highways; In Washinglon, an the source of his story and miles of farm-to-live source said Ball had reporl-1 about the result of a court- ed no progress in his bram wave lest or Mostly cloudy wilh widely scattered showers Thursday. Partly cloudy and cooler Thurs- day night and Friday. Souther- y winds at 15 to 20 m.p.h., he- morning and diminishing Fri- day. Expected Thursday tern peralurcs: Low 58, high 68. South Central Texas: Consid- erable cloudiness with widely scattered showers and coolei Thursday. Clear lo partly cloudy and cool Thursday night and Friday. High Thursday 60 72. Temperatures W e d n esday Low 52, high 72. Tides (Port Lavaca For O'Connor Lows at a.m. and p.m. Highs a p.m. Thursday and a.m. Friday. Barometric pressure at sea level: 29.77. Sunset Thursday: Sun rise Friday: This Information based on from the U.S. weather Burea Vlelorln (Srr. F.lmvheie, Of Ihe lolal number on the base, about are listed as dependents. Their gradual removal was escribed by Sylvester as "a urtber slep in Ihe process of taking the Guantanamo Naval lase enlirely sell-sufficient, and o improve the garrison posture if Ihe forces there." He told a news conference hat Ihe decision lo end family- ype living on the base will make Guantanamo "a little more ready." Actually it will make it more of a forward outpost than South Korea or South Viet Nam. Some Icpcndcnts are allowed lo ac- company military men lo both of Ihese places, and (here are no family reslriclions al all on military assignments lo Com munist-encircled Wesl Berlin. Sylvester announced lhal mil ilary tours al Gunnlanamo vvil DC reduced to one year or les in the future, instead of the present two years, "as lias been done in Ihe past for unaccom panied military personnel at re mole bases." This is intended k minimize Ihe time of family separations. Sylvester also announced that Ihe decision to reduce the (Sce DEPENDENTS, Page. 9A> day talks with Makarios. (See RUBY, Page 9A) DESPITE NON-CREDIT market roads. When Cornelius retires, t h e district will have a lotal of miles, which includes miles of U.S. and state higli- waysways and miles of farm-lo-markcl roads. Since Cornelius became dis- trict engineer, new road con- struction has amounted to million. During the same 14 years, was spent n mainlenance. The current budgel and the ost of projects now underway mounts to Project on Retarda-l A meeting of representatives is for (hough they will get from a 6-county area was held (ruction. ]no credit (or their work.'Wednesday afternoon concern- Two of the largest projects. project on implementation of still an- urrently underway are of Hope program of the Project truction of Inlerstate School, earlier had hopecllon community 0 and improvement of gc( course certified byjclinic for the examination and Course in Retardation Attracts 60 Enrollees Sixty persons, predominantly :class will meet Monday Ihrough teachers have enrolled in a Thursday at Hopkins Elemen- special' course chartered here. tary School. i Interstate 10, which Is also one of Ihe universities in Tcx-jlesting of retardates. as so that area people could] Meeting with the group was be' and ccrtiticaled represcnlalive of Ihe State to deal with various aspects of (Health Departmenl who dis- rctardation. i cussed possible financial sourc- Accrcditalion could not be as well as problems to an- ranged at this time, howeverjticipate. so Executive Director Richard "No concrete action was tak- Maclrigal Group To Appear Here The University of Texas'Mad o____t----------------- rigal Singers will appear in Vic- H. Hungerford and the project en, Hungerford said. We Sim orifl Thursday evening Of governors decided toiply discussed the various as- he auspices of Ihe Victoria Finelgo ahead on a non-credit basis, peels of this program and heard Arls Association. "We were most pleasantly reports from the delegates on The performance will Hungerford s a might be expected in their at p.m. at the Victoria Col- lepe Studonl Union Building. The university singers, com- .hen 60 persons from Refugio, respeclive counties." Irfna and Goliad, as well as] A full report on the meeting Edna Victoria, turned up posed of 13 select voices, re-jcotirso, "The Nature and Needs create Ihe setting and festive Of the N'on-Academic." atmosphere of the 16th Century banquet hnll, and provide a unitiue and piclurcsque manner of performance. Also scheduled during I h e evening is Ihe election of sev- eral new board members to the association. A number of parents of re- larded children are enrolled in the course, (or which Hunger- ford is the instructor. Seventeen students have en. rolled, also, in a special class for school drop-ouls, which was organized Monday evening. The for thejwill be made lo the board of governors at n luncheon next Wednesday, Hungerford said. Today's Chuckle An efficiency expert Is Ihe girl who (inds whit the Mauls on Ihe lirst dive into her handbag.   

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