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Advocate Newspaper Archive: February 9, 1964 - Page 1

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Publication: Advocate

Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - February 9, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 118th 275 TELEPHONE Ht S-H51 HISTORIC SITE VICTORIA, TEXAS, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1964 Established 1818 Civil War Marker To Be Dedicated By HOY GUIMES Advocate Staff Writer From first to lasl, the Civil War stripped nearly men and boys for the Confederate armies from a total Texas population of a little more than 600 000 Texas, of course, had little real experience with the desolation of fire' and sword in the years 1861-65. The shores and borders of the Lone Star State were defended with such success that there was no effective occupation until after the war, in contrast to most of the other stales of the Confederacy. There was no Sherman march hell-benl toward t h sea in a torch-light procession of ravaged lowns and burning homes. There was no Sheridan ransacking and pillaging Ihe valleys, no locust plagues of contending armies grind i n g back and forth across the stale. Bul (here was hardship enough, because Texas was drained of men, money and resources. Such fighting as went on with- in the stale was confined al- most entirely lo the Gulf Coast, at C-alveslon, at Sabine Pass, mid down around Brownsville. Civil War centennial obser- vances, accordingly, have n o I been notable in Texas. Rallying Point But n significant event of this kind is scheduled for next Sun- day, Feb. IG, in Victoria with the formal dedication of a marker at one of the chief mi- lling poinls of Ihe Confederate forces of Texas in the early days of the War. This is Ihe silc of Camp Henry K. McCul- loch. approximately two miles from the Victoria city limits on the Cucro highway. The dedication will be one of the high of a regional meeting called for Victoria by the Texas State Historical Sur- vey Committee, with the Victo- ria Counly Historical Survey Committee serving as hosts. To Hear Reports Thc regional gathering has Stations Curb Stamp Giving An estimated GO to 70 per cent of the city's 100 service station operators have given up trading stamps, it was disclosed Saturday. James Rother, treasurer of the Victoria unit of the Texas Association of Petrol- eum Retailers, said the move b e g n tentatively about two weeks ago, but that the big push has occur- red within the past two or three days. "I don't know where it's going lo Holher said, "but I doubt if there are over 15 stations in town (hat still offer slamps." Rother added (hat he was included among those who had abandoned stamps. He estimated that of the 100 stations in the city, eight or ten of those, (he bigger, ones, of Odessa, president -state-wide committee, chief purpose of hearing reports from to counties in the area which have not participated in previous regional meetings. These counties la be represent- ed here include Jim Wells, Re- fugio, N'ueces, Calhoun, Jack- son, Caldwcll, Fayetlc, Colo- rado, Fort licnd and Karnes. The assembly will gel under way at p.m. Sunday in the Central Power and Light Co. auditorium, and will be called to order by Mrs. lien T. Jordan, chairman of the Victoria County committee. Frank G. Guillard, Victoria attorney, will act as master of ceremonies. Distinguished Speakers County Judge Wayne L. Hart- man will welcome the visitors (o Victorin, and -S'hcppard will preside over (he opening of the regional conference. Will Davis of Austin, a member of Ihe slate committee, will deliver an sddre.ss .-ind former Stale Sen. William S. Fly of Victoria will speak on Camp Henry K. Mc- Culloch and Victoria in the Civil War. The ceremonies of dedication are scheduled for 3 p.m. at WASHINGTON (AP) Rights Bill Stalls Over Key Issues Final Passage Due Monday WASHINGTON CAP) The House bogged down in fights over women's rights, religion and (he aged and failed lo com- plete action Saturday on the key job equality section of the civil rights bill. Against Republican opposi- tion, the House put off a final vote until Monday. The Repub- licans had hoped (o he free lo attend Lincoln Day rallies next week. A long day in which the lead- ership hoped to push the bill to a final vote was spent instead on the fringes of the controver- sial section aimed at providing equal employment opportunities tor Negroes. Wide-Hanging Dchalc First, after a wide-ranging dis- cussion of the differences and similarities between men and women, the House voted 1GB-133 to broaden the proposed ban against racial discrimination in employment to include discrimi- nation against women. Then, after an equally circui- lions route it voted lo exempt from coverage of Ihe proposal ail church-re la ted schools, large- ly on the argument that other- wise, they might have to hire atheistic janitors. The House defeated, 123-94, an amendment by Rep. John Dow- dy, D-Tex., that would have brought discrimination on the grounds of age under the bill, too. Religious Issue Religion was brought in again Jon an amendment by Rep. John [At. Aslibrook, R-Ohio, adopted 1137-98, which provided that no [employer could be forced to! jhire an atheist under the provi- Ision of the bill. fiep. Howard Smith, D-Va., offered the amendment as to sex ,and it attracted the solid sup- iport of the Southern opponents Thc.'sccond draff, Ihey are in the omnibus bill, most of the heller established nevci' offered stamps, Holher said that stumps cost an average service sta- tion from to a year, and (hat at least part of Ihe s a v i n g s could be passed on to the custom- ers. "Some may be able to cut the price of their gaso- he said, "and others will be able to trim the cost of other products and the services offered by the sta- tion." Federal anti trust laws prohibit an mgaa'reali o n such as (he service station operators' group from tak- ing action as a unit againsl stamp firms, b u t Rother said this was not the case. "Our chapter had nothing to do with he said. "It was all voluntary on Ihe part of each operator." 42 Paga U.S. Team Sent For Cyprus Talk y -i STRANDED IN SNOW Hungry cattle forage for food in the groom area north of Amarillo but find little under the heavy blanket of snow (AP Plioto) laid down by a storm early this week. Saturday military aircraft were pressed into service in a haylift to feed stranded cattle. Brochure Includes Copy f Gettysburg Address five surviving manuscripts of Library of Congress, a priceless i women members of Ihe House Ihe Gettysburg Address in the gift, from Hay's children. a large number of Repuh- handwriting of Abraham Lincoln; "The other copies were made l'cans- are reproduced in a new folio-i by Lincoln (or Sanitary Fairs, Proposes Exemption size brochure published by for Hie benefit of wounded Rep. Graham B. Purcell Jr., LBJ Aides Rapped in Baker Case PHILADELPHIA (AP) Sen. Hugh Scott, R-Pa., said Salur- lay he is preparing a letter to FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover SNOWBOUND AREA asking that a thorough invcsli- __ i ;L _ i. i Library of Congress. 'soldiers, in New York and Bal-jD-Tex., proposed exempting A history of Ihe preparation of! (Scp BHOCHUHE, Page 8A) the speech, whose eloquence) made it pai'l of America's pa- Iriotic heritage over 100 years ago, accompanies the facsimile; reproductions. The history was written by! Iwo prominent Lincoln David C. Mearns and Lloyd A. Dunlap of the library's mana script division. church-related schools. 11 was strenuously opposed al first by the bipartisan bloc favoring the "'partisan oloc favoring the W lllte I llpllS Cellcr, J ,'D-N.j., floor manager of the O 1 "I bill, but Rep. Emanuel Celler, jCelVe OCIIOOI Ip-N.Y., floor manager of the (hill, finally capitulated and ac- lUSKbGEE, Ala. A-ieral white pupils picked up their j Thc trips took iu-ibooks at Macori County eight hours to School in nearby Notasulga on The volume will go on sale at Saturday in what some resi- the library Monday, for 51.50 described as the first slep knock Ihe" whole title from the aftcr wnich Southerners marie a half-hearted attempt to publication date Lincoln's copy. Thc limed to Wednesday. Tiie title is "Long Rernem- date is toward a mass boycott in thejbm lhus making ,he racasljre in. of desegregation effective. An amendment by Mayor James Rea said would prevent him bov-i by P.ep. Phil M. Landrum, D-Ga., accomplish this was defeated, bered." This was taken from a recently approved! 150.90 after only a desultorv de- line in the address, in which firc safety ordinance, which Scoll also said that an attemplj was made by Baker through an- other person to intimidate him and it was his understand- ng thai Sen. John Williams, R- )el., intends lo pursue the "mat- .er of the leaks of the raw files." Conflict of Interest The Senate Rules Commiitee is looking for possible conflict of interest between Baker's busi- ness activities and his duties as secretary to the Senate Demo- Lincoln said at Gettysburg Nov. Wednesday to turn 19, iro about the soldiers six Negro children. otooiwi iitci..... had-fought there four months "l couldn 1, lie said. Maioritv Leader C earlier: i would be no violations of thei nil r raar.ni "The world will little note, finance." By this lime the House had been in session nearly to hours Carl Al- SA) I nor long remember what Crimp Henry E. McCiilloch silej on Ihe Cuero highway, with Kemper Williams Sr. acting as maslrr of ceremonies and Ihe unveiling of the marker con- ducted by the William P. Rogers chamer. United Daiifih- (See MAUKKfi, PIIRC R.A) here but it can never forget Mrs. Oscar Alarck recover- nfi al Citizen's Memorial llos- wliat did here." Allen Ncvins, Civil War Kea faces a hearing before U.S. Dist. Judge Frank M. Johnson Jr. on Thursday to show cause whv he should nol c Causes Loss torian and chairman of enjoined from interfering National Civil War lnp desegregation of thcl Damage caused by a Friday Commission, says the new p.ib-1 school. licatimi deserves night fire at Ihe 0. W. Whatley rarely i Johnson ordered 12 Neqrocsir e s i d ence, tOfi Scarborough permissible word 'definitive'. I transferred from closed Tuskc-l Drive, was lisled by firemen Dr. Mearns and Dimlap nolelRce High to the Notasulga [Saturday as lhat each of the five copies ofise'100' another high school' The blaze was confined (o the the address differs slightly in j at Shorter. j bedroom and mostly to a wording, capitalization, or Rca classes are sched- clothes closet with considerable (nation. julcd to resume at NolasulRa on! smoke and heat damage mat They say in Ihe brochure's Monday. The mayor had or- j jng up most of the loss. opening statement: "The first is a draft, repre- senting Lincoln's work before delivery. The other four arc cop- ies, written by Lincoln after de- livery of the address. dcred the school closed Firemen said the fire pital after recent surgery James Angrr.slein of Bermuda anil the Air Force, paying of lhcsc versions were surprise visit to family m lhc possession of Lin- friends Lnnnlc Hess F PniviUc secretaries, John ping lo visit and anl John Hay.! not one friend but two as tile 'flrs( dnift A. .1. and .1. It, Carter leaving day following a fire at Ihe city's water filtration planl which forced the city to begin trans- porting water from nearby toivns. caused by children playing with matches. It was the. second major (ire of the day with the first vir- tually destroying a I2-room HP said that workers got home owned by the C. M. of the equipment back intoJAdlcr Estate on (he Refugio operation Saturday. Refugio Highway eleven miles south of Rea said the new cily city. The damage there was (Sec PUPILS, 1'ngc SA) [placed al Hay Airlifted To Feed Cattle AMARILLO (AP) Four big! 10 inches of snow. Drifts four t military planes began an emer-'five feet tall dot the area. ceci of >n Home, Aide To Consult With LBJ Brilain Denies Soviet Charge LONDON {AP) _ President 'ohnson dispatched a crack Irou- ile-shooling leam here Satur- lay for urgent negotiations with Srilain on the increasingly tense Cyprus situation. The President acted almost simultaneously with publication of a sharp rejection by Prime Minisler Sir Alec Douglas-Home of Soviel Premier Khrushchev's charges lhat Britain and the Jnited Slates planned invasion and occupation of the embattled Mediterranean island. Offensive Charge Douglas-Home called the alle- gations "as offensive as they are unfounded." The prime minister and For- eign Secretary R.A.B. Butler will fly to Washington for con- sultations Wednesday with John- son on Cyprus and other press- ng problems. Meanwhile, Undersecretary of State George W. Ball and three :op aides were ordered across :he Atlantic to be in inslant touch with British oficials here. New Proposals Reports were current in diplo- matic circles that Britain and the United States had new pro- posals for Cyprus President Ma- karios designed to meet his ob- jections to the proposed Ipeacekceping force drawn from to "I'd say (here are toirnembers of Ihe Norlh Atlantic cattle which have bad Treaty including the United States. very Mine to eat -at least half of them, nothing since Men- information derogatory to a wit- leased aides tion. rangeland still covered by 8 lo Panel Urges o One of the planes developed: Khrushchev's direct incursion engine trouble _after making ,1s into the silualion was the first drop of 30 bales of hay near Skellytown, 50 miles norlheast of lAmarillo. factors increasing tension on the island. Brilain landed 800 fresh Iroops Saturday (o relieve some For Elderly JOHNSON CITY, Tex. JA presidential Council on Aging urged Saturday a boost in Soc- ial Security benefits and a pro- JX 7 rCS'g to let older persons turn When one of Ihe engines stop-iof the Tommies who have been ped, the plane was al 400 feel, trying to keep order since bloody Capt. Howard Brannin of Hous-moling broke out Christmas be- ton, the pilot, ordered some 100 tween Greek and Turkish Cypri- bales on the plane thrown out. in ttinir hninnc: le "hi v cont ;a Ihnm l fire on Oct. 7. In a telephone interview ?cranlon, where he addressed Young Republican group, Scolt! Eft persons or persons higher than "ndcl thc the FBI in government. I am in agreement with the story in the New York Times that informa- ion derogatory lo Reynolds made il safely lo Am- The U.S. Slate Department arillo Air Force Base on one stressed once again that the engine. j United Stales has "a major in- iaf Securitv benefits and a pro- CaPLiterest .in 'he maintenance of t'ur iDan Hall, Ihe co-pilot, crewmen [peace in the eastern Mcditi Airman l.C. Everett Moore and Sgt. F. T. King, all of Houston; a rancher and I've National Guardsmen, who were not ident- "..S'ified; Ed Calton, s. photographer for the Amurillo News-Globe; 'Austin Schneider, photographer (Don B. Reynolds) was offered to at leasl three newspapers by While House aides." llreal Impropriety igh a r center in Austin. No Specific Plan The council did nol say how] much Social Security rales Scoll said llial whal he termed ought lo be raised or'lo what the activities of While Hoiiselrlegrcc coverage of old age sur- aides in attempting to and disability benefits It merely "the Ivisory council on Social Security j 'financing give early attention to measures to improve" the cov-. ,ot Tllomas Bishop, 'sU'lc ill'Jlllsm general. (See AHILII'T, Page SA) liter- interest which it for- tunately shares with many other nations. It will do whatever it can U) assure lhat objective." Makarios has insisted that any units sent to keep order in Cy- prus be under the control of Die U.N. Security Council. Britain and the United States have re- sisted this because they say it would open Ihe way for Soviet inlrusion and obstruction. Determinalion to prevent So- viet interference was believed lo be one reason for Doiiglas- (Scc TEAM, Page 8A) the testimony of Reynolds "e.x- should be extended, ceeds any similar impropriety in recommended my memory." He said "thai what he called the altempt lo impugn any ness testifying against Baker isieragc" a "dreadful thing because it was a violation of his civil rights and could set a precedent thai would be dangerous to any other Amcr- (Sce AIDES. Page SA) OFFER firnvcr Hornier having her shopping marred with car trouble Al Wortliham chos- ing a new location inside ra- ther than outside during Ihis cold spell Friends discov- ering Mrs. Kit Sagcr hack nl her old pcisilion after a long absence Air. and Mrs. C. II. Hall celebrating their (iftlli wed- ding anniversary having been si married at Ihe old German'si generalities appeared to he a! AUSTIN (AP) President tat odds last week over plans by desire nol lo gel any more spe- Lyndon Johnson stayed on his cific proposals in the way of the ranch Saturday while Gov. John administration's legislation forC'onally departed for his ranch, Ivcallh care for the elderly leaving Texas politicians won- undor Social Security. The conn- tiering if they would gel togeth- cil commended health care and er for a political peace pipe City Moving Slowly By TOM K. KITF, Advocate hlnff Wriln Three weeks have elapsed arc lukewarm since Victoria Counly counly offer, lioncrs Court presented its p.ir-i Fnl. oru. ,hil1g> ,hc ci[ Unofficially, there were stronglsub-slation might include a quick to agree indications Dial city headquarters. I "I can'l believe ii al hcsl to Hie' "No' definitely (he cily with a firc station or police i.i ui.it urn.- i.___i____.___ :_ :i and added: in a city hall :ion or police manager replied. "The police headquarters in it; and 1 can'l Town (Schrocder) near Victoriajchasc offer (o Cily Council for tirady Lee explaining city-owned north half is ideal weather for lale sleep- courthouse square, ing .Miss Rosa Lrc Hue- A decision by the city appear- hanin back from llearnc .'cd little friends being informed thai than it headquarters should be near the mana.icolirlnousc [joth cllief (jonn) or expressed the view this aRrcc on Ihe cily will need lo find LCC explained thai easy ac- a nearby site not only for (o Ihe courthouse is ir; re-locallon of Ils Central to expedite (he filinci nearer this weekend Station, bul also for its police Of cascs nnd the participation of! did al the end of Ihcihcadquarlers. This means that officers in grand jury and court see a fire station with a police slalion in it. "If we could find an area large enough lo accomodale both, Ihcn Ihal would be fine." Williams pointed out, however, lhat cost of such a silc at cotton buyer Pete Morrow is ill, Jan. 20 council meeting at which property would have to be ac-iaclions. al his home in Tulin III announcing Sam Counly Judge Wayne Harlman Trail of Six Flags Theatre read- ings for the next two prodiic that made the offer. Officially, Mnyor Kemper Wil- Jr., who was assigned lo quired for both in an area where! Location of the Cenlral Firc prices arc possibly the highest gcnol.ai area ings tor the noxl Iwo promic- jr., Was assigned lo tions will bo the mailer with Cily Man- Wednesday at p.m. Hospi-lager John Lee, said lhat "we Inlity House Willis Ai'in-lsiinply hnven'l gone nearly far slrnng always wanliiiR lo be enough yet lo determine but jured foot. icily in." One reason for the resort lo BJ, Connolly: Will They Talk? U.S. Rep. Joe Kilgore, D-Tex., considered a conservative by Texas Democrats, lo challenge Sen. Ralph Yarborough, leader of Texas' so-called liberal Dem- apparently thinks it should have smoking. Reports said Johnson wanted priority. An aide said Connally andjlhe campaign plans cancelled No Comment by I.B.I i.Iohnson talked by telephone] (See LBJ, Page 8A) In releasing the report, before the Connallys left dent Johnson was silent on big-! for their Floresville ranch, 30 ger Social Security benefits.'miles soulhwesl of San And he mentioned the the early afternoon, ing of home equities only asj The aide said the two "dis- something the council had re- cussed no local politics" and recommended without they made no plans to dorsing it. :meet or talk during the remain. Bui again he called Ihe modi- der of Johnson's weekend slay care program for Ihe aged "one in Texas. of the most urgent orders of' Johnson arrived in Austin Fri- business at Ihis lime." The leg- day nighl to attend the Sunday islalion is tied up in the House 'funeral of Mrs. .1. 0. Kcllam, Ways and Means Committee, iwifc of a longlime Johnson as- The President said in a slate- sociate and friend. He and Mrs, THE WEATHER Clear lo partly cloudy and a little warmer Sunday through Monday. Mostly southerly winds at 8 lo 18 m.p.h. Expected Sun- day temperatures: Low 38, high administration will continue ranch, 65 miles west of in the cily. For some lime Lee has studied Ihe possibility of a utilities and .ve tax collection sub-station in not only Ihe downtown business of Hie present site already had been declared a necessity, since it is this station which servos some part of the cily as a district but all of the south amllbnck yet in dollars nnd cents.' us of taking some of the southwest portions of the cily. hindered by an in- kind of shape Ihis will leave. off the inadequate Cily Questioned about Ihe no'intjowners hnve (old him'lha'l "if IHall. He was asked if such airalsed by Lee, Mayor Williams' lie added Ihal some properly ivs hnve (old him Ih; CITY, Page 8A> build on Ihe efforts of President) Austin, after a brief airport l r u Ir ul i i brtiu Ml a Mine- -Juvjtuc nmi nji-jiu. ill: 
                            

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