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   Advocate (Newspaper) - February 7, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 118th 273 TELEPHONE HI 5-H51 IN SENATE RACE VICTORIA. TEXAS, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1964 AUSTIN (AP) Two Repub- lican candidates for the U. S. Senate Thursday denounced what they called Washington in- terference in the matter of Democratic primary opposition lo Sen, Ralph Yarborough, D- Tex. "President Johnson said who could and couldn't file in this year's Texas charged Dr. Millon Davis, Dallas sur- geon, al an Austin news confer- ence. Earlier in Ihe day and In Ihe same room in the Texas capitol, Houston oilman Jack Cox said it was "common knowledge all over Texas" that pressure from Washington look Joe Kilgore out of the Democratic primary Yar- borough must win to stay in of- fice. Kilgore, U. S. representative from McAllen, announced hours before Ihe filing deadline Mon- day lhat lie would seek no office this year. There had been specu lation Kilgore would strong conservative to Yarboroijgh, n leader of lib- eral forces in Texas. Others seeking the GOP sena- torial nomination besides Co> and Davis are Robert Morris of Dallas and George Houston. Several withdrawals and new filings Thursday slightly altered Texas politics. Cox and Davis both said Ihey were supporters of Arizona Sen- ator Barry Goldwater for the Republican presidential nomina- tion. "The nomination of an Eastern liberal would hurt Davis said. Neither Cox nor Davis would offer much support for Presi- dent Johnson's administration. Davis said Cox's entry into the Child Care Center Site Determined By BHUCE PATTON Advocate Staff Writer A permanent site and a tar- get date for opening of Becky Lack Child Day the ing of the directors, called after the center has been granted a charter as a profit corporation by the Texas _ Carej Department of Public Welfare Center was decided on at al Date for the meeting has meeling of directors Thursday afternoon at Hopkins School. The directors approved the building formerly Lack's Stores, Inc. used by at Siaylon, Depot, and North Cameron a site for establishment of center. And April 1 was set atj target dale at which directors hope the center will be come operational. A building commillee headed by J. W. Hunlcr has investi- gated numerous possible sites for the center since it was au- thorized lo do so Iwo months ago. All other sites seriously considered were gradually eliminated for one or more rea- sons. Other members of the com- mittee are David Engel, Rich- ard Sweeney, A. R, Wearden, and Mrs. Roy High. I Hunlcr poinled out that con-i siderable renovation of been set, although C. C. Cars- ner Jr., commitlee chairman, indicated that it might be this month. Arrangements with leasing of the properly are 'be made laler. Mrs. Robert Rick was named last month as director of Chi'd Care Center. day's meeting, Mrs. Hagins, personnel chairman, reported that Rachel (See CENTER, property will be required before it can be used as a cbild care center. A contracting firm has offered to do the work al cost, although no definite figure was given at the directors' meeting. He indicated after the board meeting (hat he was highly pleased wilh both the site and! the action of the board. Building committee members have conferred with Dave Lack, building owner. Htuiter said thai Lack indicaled that he be- lieved the selection of the site for the center was a good one. Establishment of the center was made possible last Novem- ber when Lack offered to con- tribute a year for a period of al leasl Ihrce years, as well as furnishings in order lhat such a center could become a reality However, in his offer, Lack marie no stipulations as lo site of the center, and declined any voice in governing of t h e center. Directors agreed Monday to JACKSON, Miss. the Ured Thursday night m D office sp senate race was not unexpected. Cox filed shortly before Amcnclmeiils Slow Tax Davis filed last f of 1 Ihoiighl Cox could IftrJ 71 Yarborough, I probably wouldn't be Davis refused Thursday to snock out Ihe 10 per cenl tax on theater tickets and J f >rris commented lhat he the perennial effort (o ash Cox would have Wk per cent oil and John Connally in 1962 if nd new altered id Ihey ia had waged an actually contested primary race. Cox polled over votes but lost by Davis is making his first bid for public blocked was a move lo give head-of-household status (o all 18 million unmarried taxpayers over age 35. This was wa-ered down to limit it to or the omina-Jastcrn said he advocated doing away with the graduated income lax, which he called "con-fiscatory." He also said the exe-culive branch was getting who support any de-lendent, relative or non-rela-ive. But even this is expected to be killed by the Senate-House conference on the bill after "i would power and thai the federal f arm program should be either changed or passage. These votes were taken as the Senate ptodded inlo would be for the good session, its rush GOP Page of the nio bill slowed by debate over I flood of fes Loss Cited The effort to remove the x m tax on tickets to live thea-ler productions was made by Sen. Jacob K, Javits, R-N.Y. i Mrs. professional Ihealers Mae Hackwortlie, York had been losing operates the House million each year and in Urenham, paid is just what the to 000 filing fee Thursday in from the excise is the fourth proposal was voted POWPltlTlT ITT a Ihe Dcmocralic to 33 after Sen. Russell 1 IVJ i 1 D-La., floor manager righl plump, lax bill, had urged Javits chairman, as entered the his proposal laler as from L room and held measure or a rider and Johm alofl for a other of the annuaJ c be and said: "This is To at Inez. Helc said he would ack fold newsmen she a move because it are her campaign "on nickels and dimes it simpler for the President (o veto it, if he wished. MOD She polled would have had of the to come out 50th in IDfil balloting'on 72 candidates for the U.S. the whole tax bill to ge at the proposal under Javits nmitlec Rachel e vacated by i'residenl Johnson. Sen. John Tower, K-Te.v.. move to cut the depletion allowance on oil and gas was made by Sen. John J. Williams, R-Del and it was beaten 61 's Williams was supported b> 25 Democrats and 8 Republicans and opposed! by 41 Democrats and 20 check for turned over to the Marc Dimes Thursday, represe (he herculean efforts of the in its one-day and gas producers now can deduct from their taxable income up to 2VA per cent Saturday. Johnny Mikus, chairman Leroy Hepka, co chair gross income so long An all white iurv does not exceed 50 per Ihe money over to ard Goldslucker, Victoria 14 Cents Cuba Naval Base Promised Water (ArivocaCe Pholo) Howard event included an auction of cakes county MOD and other edibles, a raffle, dance, cepts a check and various other events. Despite Leroy Repka, co- the size of the community, the check Mikus, chair- represents the largest amount from mmunity cam- any phase of the drive this year, Saturday, the Goldstucker said. Six Flag Riders At End of Trail Saddle sore riders and their weary horses, who left Victoria Sunday with the Six Flags Trail Ride.lda'e, Fla., signed a contract in LBJ Says Move Isn't Surprising U.S. Prepared To Supply Need WASHINGTON (AP) Cuba eut off outside water supplies to the big U.S. naval base at Guan- tanamo Thursday, but Presi- dent Johnson declared in New York that the troops and their families there "will have the waler they need." Fidel Castro's government cut off the water to the base in an attempt to force the release of 36 Cuban fishermen held by Florida authorities. Kept Advised Johnson, in New York for a speech, departed from his pre- pared text to discuss the Guan- tanamo water situation. He had been kept closely advised dur- ing the day on dovelopments at the base, a keystone in the U.S. defense of the Caribbean. Johnson said it was clear long ago that the Castro regime soon- er or later would cut off water to the base. Steps were taken, he said, to make certain that enough wafer to last 12 days would be in storage at Gan- tanamo. He added that the Unit- ed States Is prepared to move water to Guantanamo indefinite- ly by ship from Port Ever- glades, Fla. Contract Signed The port, part of Port Lauder- ithout reaching its verdict on whether Byron De La Beckwith was the ambush killer of Medgar Evers, a leader in the civil rights battle of Leon Hendrick sent the jury bed at p.m. it had de- liberated seven hours and 10 minutes. The jury had first gone invite Lack lo a special meei- Alabama Mayor To Court TUSKEGEE, Ala. (API-Ala- bama's newest school Integra- tion dispute look an abrupt turn net income, based on part on the theory thai sale of oil and gas is selling capital assets. Williams sought lo cut the allowance back steps to 20 per He also included in his proposal a cutback in the 23 per cenl depletion allowance for sulphur, uranium and other min- erals to 20 per cent over the three years. The SO per cent net-income ceiling also applies out at p.m. at the con- clusion of a trial wilh strong racial overtones. The state contended that Beckwith, an active segrega- tionist, killed Evers to strike a blow at the cause for which Evers stood. to him the oil and gas industry "I Judge HendnckL here. A Bigger Share Williams said it seems clear said when ho summoned the into Uie courtroom, "that a ver- s Thursday as Mayor James Mt rcached of Nolasulga pledged to bow to federal court authorities. Rea, who barred six Negroes from a white school Wednesday, diet." When the reply was in the af- firmative, he lold Ihe jurors, "Your minds must be in a mud- said he would abide by to 8el n ruling resulted from court hearing Feb. This docs not mean, however, thai Notasulga High actually will be integrated because Rca Alvln Ray Schooner from the Marine Corps and out already has said he has authori- ty (o close the school under a city ordinance. Town Quite Nolasulga, a town of in easl Alabama, was quiet. ____i The Associated Press learned I that Army units were on alert A mil at Fl- Banning, Ga., for possi- rest, resume your (Sec BECKWITH, Page 7) [is able to shoulder a bigger share of the national tax burden. Javils supporting Williams, said there is a widespread feeling among the public that the 38- year-old depletion allowance is "a sacred cow" that somehow can't be touched. Williams' proposal would have brought in an estimated annual (See ALLOWANCE, Page 7) ty chairman for the MOD. Only By Drive Last year's contribution was ligher, but also included a donation. This year's money was raised entirely through the drive that is not only community- wide, but has attracted national attention. Goldstucker pointed out thai the contributions were made by a community that includes not over 150 families, but so far represents the largest s ingle phase of Uie MOD drive this year. ended their 122-mile trip to San Antonio al mid-after- noon Thursday. The 150 riders completing the trip had logged some 35 hours ol hard riding, but it did not keep from whooping it up western style with about other trail ride participants at barbecue and dance in Pearl Corral Thursday evening. Mrs. Edgar Gossetl, secre- Hams 500 Miles Off Aid Rancher HOUSTON (AP) P. C jCoates, 52, who suffered a heart other trail ride groups in 'altack, was alive at a Fort Western Day parade at 1 (Stockton Hospital Thursday per- a.m. Friday through Aow baps because of two Houston ham radio operators. Thomas H. Archer, 50, and 1961 to fill tankers with all the waler needed at Guantanamo. Johnson arranged to meet at the White House Thursday night, immediately on his re- turn from New York, with some of his key military and diplo- matic advisers to canvass the Guantanamo situation. The President said there was no doubt that the 36 Cuban fish- tary-treasurer of the sponsor-, _. ing Wheel and Spur Riders, saidiermf "rested off the Florida good weather prevailed during! coa.st the last day of the trip from SI walers ct Unlted Stales- Hedwig lo Ihe Alamo Cily. Joseph (Jake) Domino, 49, radio operators, were chatting: early Thursday when a mutfledjjlorscs> The local riders will join six the dmmtown San Antonio, an event which of- ficially signals the start of the 10-day stock show exposition Liicy will load up their motor back to their Inside U.S. Walcrs The Cuban action in cutting off the water supply prompted suggestion in Congress that the United Slates impose a naval blockade on the Communist- ruled island. The Cuban government, prior to cutting off the walersupply. insisted the 36 fishermen had been seized in international wa- i voice broke into their wa'1 un''' nex' Feb- tcrs but the United States re- ruary before mounting up for jccted the claim. It said the Sandhop has already been ed chairman of the 1965 drive! "I think am dying. I'm bav- in Inez, with Calvin Lemke asjing a heart attack." vice chairman. Inez Leaders Inez residents who took a lead- Then a woman's voice said: "This is Rachel Coales. My husband, P. C. Coates, is having the fourlh Trail Ride. annual Six Flags Today's Chuckle ing role in the drive include the'a please call his following: Mrs. Will Kulchka, (See MOD, Page 7) Snow Causes Suffering, Death in Plains, Texas mother, Mrs. Collins Coales, in Stockton and tell her to; j bring a doctor quick." Mr. and Mrs. Coates were at! their ranch 55 miles southeast! The garage attendant lookctl at the battered car ami lold the woman driver: "Sorry lady. We only wash don't iron them." Cubans were within Ufe miles of U.S. territory when taken by the U.S. Coast Guard. Johnson said that shortly be- fore the fishing vessels were in- tercepted, their captains report- Jed b y radio to Havana that they were inside U.S. waters. Castro in a recorded inter- (Sce CUBA, Page 7) of Fort Slocklown They had IN telephone and had tried unsuc ccssfully nf service after a four-year tour of duty in California, Dr. Thomns Martin downtown tor lunch and impressed willi Ihe ble use in Alabama. i Both the white and Negro schools were closed in Nota- invigorating wealher Mor- ri.s l.azor spending a quiet lunch hour Bronle Club members reminded thai the program to- day at 3 p.m. is a guest day Mrs. Boliliy Carter and Mrs.j Arthur Dielzcl altcnding a pho- tographer's meeting in S a n An- tonio Louis Watson serving as chauffeur for A. J. Peterson and Dill Rurtrfock and Ilia latter explaining aboul calorie diets while looking over a sleak lunch with mushroom gravy Owen Dennis making prepa- ralions to diagnose and correct tin annoying squeak in his au- tomobile Unrvcy Spies lak- ing no chance with the weather ami having his car healer checked Gerald Wlginglnu renewing old friendships Leroy Wallers laking his afler- noon off by driving through the countryside for a visit to Cheap- sulga after a fire Wednesday night i n the waterworks filler system. The damage created a waler shortage and school offi- cials decided to suspend opera- lions until repairs are made. Attendance Falls At nearby Shorter, six other Negroes returned for the second day lo Ihe former while high school. Attendance fell off, in- dicating a possible white boy- cott, but there were no un- toward ineidenls. It was a white pupil walkout at Tuskegec High which left (Sec MAYOR, Page 7) side plaining want lo gel caught up wilh his Charlie Sdionncr ex- Dial lie doesn't ever coiirl ruler) Thursday. up, he's not trying to do enough Carol Ktpplc ami Rosemary Vog( wondering whether rolli Academy graduates of would be interested in having a class reunion in 19G1. AMAIULLO, ilagued great portions of the Jniled Stales Thursday, espe- cially Ihe Southern Great Plains and tlie Southwest which suf- 'crcd through back-lo-back bliz- zards. New Mexico's governor de- clared that state's third county an emergency area as the sec- ond blizzard roared inlo Ihe snowbound plains country. Pic- turesque Santa Fe, N.M., be- came an emergency communi- cations center. killed by (rains by the thousands in Tex- Aliens' Work Righls Upheld WASHINGTON (AP) The thousands of Mexican aliens who cross the Rio Grande daily to work in this nalion have a righl to do so, a high federal The U.S. Court of Appeals work, since if one gels caught Uirew out a suit by the Texas Slate AFL-CIO seeking to halt tho practice. The union had complained lhat the alien workers were lak- ing jobs away from U.S. citi- tight, found its way into the Texas Panhandle where drifls were already 10 feet deep from Monday's blizzard. Hundreds of persons ma- rooned in an 11-mile strip of U.S. 66 east of Amarillo, Tex., were rescued by a special pas- senger train. Bt an estimated GOO persons spent Wednesday and Thursday nights in Groom, Tex., also East of Amarillo. Mrs. P. S. Hurl, 5-1, of Okla- homa Cily, told of conditions in "Iroom. "Some of the young travelers as and New stockmen tried Mexico. Some to deliver feed more when sides. by tractor, but drifts as high as 20 feel blocked llieir way. Ten persons were known dead in Texas and five in New Mexico but officials feared bodies would be found Ihe blowing snow sub- Gov. Jack Campbell of New Mexico cotisidcrcd calling for federal assistance as helicop- ters from Cannon Air Force Base, N.M., scoured the snow- swept countryside for families in need of help. Motels and hotels along trans- continental U.S. 66 in New Mex- ico and Texas were swamped with tourists. Many stayed in private homes, gns stations ami churches as it turned colder Thursday jiighl. More snow, through ralher are out of money and she said, "but the peo-.conversation with Rachel Coales WASHINGTON (AP) A on its use by the commander ol the military and civilian Naval Base says living on the base. Archer. pie of Groom are treating them Ar' wonderfully." .-........_ .._.... ____ __ Mrs. Hurlsaid motorists were f I" voice' which was never j water cut off by Cuba" may sloping in private homes, gas stations and churches. One res- taurant, she said, was offering free food. THE WEATHER Moslly cloudy, a liltle colder Friday. Saturday, (air and lo reach ham opera- tors in the Fort Stockton area. Domino notified Coates' 70- year old mother, who sped to the ranch. About the time she arrived, have 'another voice broke into the Former Skipper Says Guantanamo Can Hold a in identified. Coates to He give advised great inconvenience, pos- He meant that the base inhab- itants might be told lo stop her hardship, but will not shake'washing cars or watering lawns "something...anything" to easc.the'u.S, hold. Tom Evans, 27, a stockman Portable as possible. Ihe pain and make him as com- Rear Adm. Edward J. O'Don-Smachines. or lo curtail Ihe use of washing ;nell, who commanded at Guan- O'Donnell said that when he was commanding at Guantana- and manager of the motel where Save n'm a KSfr ofjtanamo Ihroughoul the Cuban -v Mrs. Hurt stayed, said cattle !wbisky Md put him lo bed. -'missile crisis, told The Asso- mo, the population used about probably were dying by the Archer then raised a game cialcd Press on Thursday the two million gallons a day, a thousands. warden in Fort Stockton, Jerry Navy long ago foresaw the pos-llevel he called generous. mild. North winds at 8 to IB Lale Thursday night the only m.p.h. Expected Friday tern- pcralurcs: Low 40, high 58. South Central Texas: Increas- ing cloudiness and a little cold- er Friday. Cloudy Friday night running low on food and fuel.' wilh occasional rain. Clearing Snlurdny. High Friday 54-64. way to travel in Groom was by tractor. "The Evans town's cut said, "and cafes and grocery stores are About 20 families stranded (he Coales ranch. "I've been lucky enough to who sent a doctor to sibility of a water cut-off andi The water ship moored in lo mine by he said, "and I've taken food to them. But many people can't do it. The snowdrifts are loo high." Evans said cattle could live in the snow two days without feed. New Violence Strikes Cyprus NICOSIA, Cyprus violence has hit Cyprus. Seven Turkish Cypriots and 'prepared for it. JGuantanamo Bay" has a capa- There may be great of about four million gal- venience, possibly some hard-jlons. .ship, but Ihe vil.il functions of; The Boston born O'Dormell the base are not going to de-jwas in charge of the Guantan- pend on water from Ihe out- amo base for more than two O'Donnell said in an in- terview. Since 1938, the base has bought its water from a evaluation work. years. A little over a year ago, lie was reassigned to the Penta- gon where he now is in weap- Temperalures Thursday: Low N.M., near Las Vegas were i, high 69, lievcd by New Mexico Nati< 46, Tides (Port Lavaca Porl O'Connor Low at a.m., and high at p.m. Barometric pressure at sea level: 29.79. Sunset Friday: Sunrise Saturday: This information baled on data Irom Uic U.S. Wealhtr Bureau WeaUitr F.lirwlme, four Greek Cypriots were killedjpany jn eastern Cuba. Even dur-j The Guantanamo base is a and a Turkish village was, [ng (he tense times since Fidcrrelativcly self contained com- biirncd Thursday in a came lo power, this flowimunily isolated on the eastern ___ Hunfight soulh of Nicosia. Bril-jhas continued unchecked. Un-! tip of Cuba. without food in San troops again slcpp-xl in Castro the government hnd: Its Jl-.vjuare-milc land area were peace. itaken over (he operation. jand H square miles of bay are _, .._.....------ National! Americans remaining on the Each month, a in by Castro's Cuba Guard and wearmns put onj0f Waler company showed j with Cuban Iroops posled around ,L _ i isolated, life on the riers (hat broke drifts with supplies. Roy, N.M., which uses pro- pane gas for heating and cook- .1 ,JU1- yi iiiu Wriltl LUllllJrtll} UO 2 through Ihe special alert. All were warned [up at the base and was pa id! Ihe perimeter, ies. lo slay indoors. Sometimes he was givoni Although iso There was no immediate parts to keep the corn- to revive the airlift lhat moved pany's equipment in shape. ing, was about 15 per cent near s'2 American women and chil-] O'Donnell said 15.0 million emptying its fuel tanks. The il'ren Wednesday to nearby Leb- gallons slorcd ashore and on a laie town's inhabitants About the same in Guanlanamo Bay could-and base has been ralher comfort- able, especially for families, ex- ccpl during the missile crisis of their fuel from Borger, American dependents had last for weeks, with some water also shut In by snowdrifts. Ichoacn lo slay. i distillation facilities ind tome 1962. At lhat children of lime, wives servicemen were evacuated to the U.S. (Sec SKlPl'KIt, Paijn I)   

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