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Advocate: Monday, February 3, 1964 - Page 1

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - February 3, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                118th 269 THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE TELEPHONE m J-14J1 VICTORIA, TEXAS, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1964 Diplomats Push Plan For Cyprus Idea Opposed By President NICOSIA, Cyprus !sh and American diplomats worked feverishly Sunday lo ihange Cyprus President Maka- rio's opposition to proposals for J NATO police force on this ern- ontlled island. They saw several iopeful signs. One was thai the bearded prc- did not reject the plan out- right when it was formally itibmillcd to him Sunday morn- Ing by Cyril Pickard, lirilish un- dersecretary of slalc for Com- monwealth affairs. He had (old Pickard and U.S. Ambassador Wilkins on Saturday, before Ihe formal sub- mission, that (he plan was un- acceptable. Chief Objection Another sign was that Greek Cypriot delegates postponed Ihcir return to the London con- ference on Cyprus whore they hail been expected to give a last, final refusal of Ihe plan. Greek Cypriots and Iheir press have vehemently opposed ihe plan which would increase the lirilish peacekeep- ing force to men drawn Irom all North Atlantic Treaty Organization countries including the United States. Cyprus Vice President Fazil1 Kulchuk, member of the Turkish community, said lie ac- cepted the plan in principle, Faco-Saving Chief reason for Greek Cypri- ot objection is that the proposals contain no clause for a political solution which would ban parti- tion of (lie island between Greeks and Turks. The Greek Cvprlols are violenlly opposed to this. Makarios Is expected to give Establlshed Camera Failure Spoils Ranger Moon Collision IP HRS, 16 HRS. HRS. MOON'S GRAVITY BEGINS TO FULL' RAKGER 40HRS.J 50 HRS." TERMINAL MANEUVER 55 MINUTES BEFORE IMPACT 20 HRS. ROUTE OF THE 6 made it to the moon Sunday but failed its mission when an apparent power failure prevented it from transmitting television pictures back to earth. Nonetheless, its nearly 66- hour, mile flight on target was a worthy scientific accomplishment, and chart above shows path taken from Atlas-Agena launch vehicle to moon. a definite answer either day or eral counterproposals. Mon- Congress Due Busy Week On Tax-Cut, Rights Bills WASHINGTON cratic congressional leaders are hoping to hit the jackpot this week with passage in separate branches of the two major items on President Johnson's 196-1 legislative program. better than a 50-50 chance to complete action this week oa the omnibus civil rights bill. Passage with little change is foreseen for the 10-point meas- ure. Once the lax bill clears Ihe dent wants it enacted in time to put reduced withholding rales into effect March 1. mn cmr mfliiugeL ui me i .a-, acniuc, u win DC very close to The civil rights measure, how- said enactment still faces a rough test in Senate managers of the it will be very close to planned quickly with a view to 12 Cents Televising Equipment Inoperative 6lh Failure In Program PASADENA, Calif. United Slates' moon exploration program hit another snag Sun- day when the camera-carrying Ranger 6 crashed into the moor without televising a single pic- ture. The B04-pound spacecraft, launched three days ago from Cape Kennedy, performed beau- tifully up to the final 10 minutes of flight, when its six cameras were supposed to begin taking a series of pictures from 900 miles high down to impact But they failed lo operate. First Close-Up Scientists had hoped the pic- tures would give them their first close-tip look at the moon's sur- face and help them select a site for manned Apollo moonship landings later in this decade. It was the sixth straight fail- ure in the Ranger program which so far has cost some million, figured at about million a shot. LONG TREK BEGINS These are a part of the horse and wagon riders that left Victoria Sunday morninng in light rain for the long journey to (Advocate Photo) ban Antonio. The riders, young and old, will be guests at a dance at 8 p.m. Monday at Yorktown Communi- ty Hall. getting the bill on Johnson's! Dr. Homer Newell of the Na- desk by George Washington's (ional Aeronautics and Space Birthday, Feb. 22. The Presi- What these will be was not known but they were eagerly and they are confident that branchinol likely to be irreconcilable awaited by bolh British American officials. licturn Postponed Some formula or (ace-saving plan still might be formnlaledjTT if Makarios can find a graceful! I way to reverse the field. But allied officials say Maka- rios does not have much room to maneuver. The whole proposal never has been made public and diplomat- pass it by the end of the week, possibly as early as Thursday. House leaders said they have differences between the Senate version and the one passed by the House last September. A Senate-House conference is l rt 111t. By Hospital in Blackout been made public and diplomat-! CHICAGO (AP) _ Staff and story Cook County institution Ic sources hinted thai this patients of Cook County which he calls the largest single give Makarios more room loillospilal slill had no elevator the plan hand-iservice Sunday, following Satur- ed him Sunday was not (heiday's 7'i-hour blackout caused same one which Uie Greek Cy-Jby an electrical blast in the in- ......J solution's powerhouse. Except for trudging up and structure, activities were back d any troops it sends to the to normal after a harrowing sland will be for a three-month night. priots termed unacceptable at ihe London conference. 3-Montli Stay The United Stales has-insist- ed isla period only. The plan calls at the sameied also lo lime for the political future ofjLuke's Hospital with 700 pa- Ihc island lo he settled by a me- lients, for an hour Saturdav dialor from another NATO conn- try other than Britain or Amer- ica. Moreover, Greece and Tur- nighl. The power failure was exlend- ._ largest single hospital in the United States. The entire plant of six sub-hos- pitals is one 18V4 acre quad- rangle, and has beds. "The most amazing thing about he said, "is that there down stairs in the eight-floor wasn't a single surgery amphi- night while a utility company circuit was shut off to permit installation of by-pass cables theatre in use at the time. If there had been we would have just had to go up there and fin- ish the job with flashlights." "Immediately after the pow- er went off, I ordered (he dis- aster plan. Guards immediately ran into the street to direct fire trucks into the court, and key nurses and department heads key would waive treaty rights with which temporary repairs reported to this office The first lo intervene if the island's in-jwcrc made. thing we did was calm (he pa- _ _ dependence or constitution is threatened during that period. The United States expects to (See DIPLOMATS. Page 5) "Wc were (he extent you can he for such a said Fred A. Ifertwig, superintendent of the old eight- SKRVICK TO BUND he said. O iiraille bystein Dies at 76 in "We evacuated about 25 pa- tients to Presbyterian St Luke's. These were admiltces maternities about lo be deliv- ered and patients being pre- pared for emergency surgery." Many of these patients made Ihe trip in wheel chairs pushed lie Senate once it is passed by he House. Southern senators lave vowed to make use of the mlimited debate rule to the full- est to try lo kill it or at least 'orce substantial amendments. Both Senate and House are to lave an informal Lincoln's Birthday recess from Feb. 11 to Feb. 17. In the Senate, Southerners iave served notice they will center their attack on three pro- visions of the civil rights bill- desegregation of public facili- ties, elimination of discrimina- tion in employment, and power for Ihe federal government to wthhold grants from any pro- gram when racial discrimina- 'ion is pracliccd in use of the money. In the Senate (ax debate, ad- ministration supporters were concentrating most of their ef- forts on defeating a college edu- cation amendment of Sen. Abra- ham A. Riblcoff, D-Conn., and two Republican moves. One of the principal GOP ef- forts will be to repeal or modify the 10 per cent excise tax on furs, cosmetics, luggage includ- ing handbags, and jewelry in- cluding watches. The other will be to eliminate the provision in tbe bill which Administration said three more launchings of identical Hanger spacecraft are scheduled this year, and that Ranger 7 would be ready lo go within a month. Impact Time Shootings In State Claim Six ny THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Tlie weekend violent death Imiiarf Tirm. i Tllc weekend violent death i wagons ana an me parapherna- Hanger 6 moacted on in Tcxas stood at U a Century trail ride and on time at a m Onl" two the deaths were left Victoria City Park Sunday Central Standard Time in ai'1} traffic accidents. Six persons morning on a 122-mile trek to Hocnrt.ia-o [died in shoolincs and three Alamo city. Trail Riders Start Long Trek in Rain Little and big horses, young I five-day journey, which is sched- riders and oldLiraers, mules and u led to take 35 hours of good riding. desert-like plain called the of Tranquillity 400 miles lo the right of the center of the visible side of the moon. ers died in miscellaneous acci- dents. The Associated Press count be- Afler a blessing of the ride, more thin 300 riders began their A signal was sent at a.m. g.a" al 6 p.m. Friday and eon- ordering the spacecraft's cam- tinued until Sunday midnight, era system to begin warming Bobby B. Curry, 10, son of up, but apparently it failed to (Mr. and Mrs. Rocky Dean Cur- io so. Television Iransmissionsjry of near Seminole, was acci- back from the vehicle neverjdentally electrocuted Sunday achieved the full power neces-iwhen an irrigation pipe he tilled sary lo reach the huge antennas [to rout a rabbit came in contact at the Goldstone tracking a high voltage wire. (See CONGHESS, Page S) lion 170 miles northeast of Pasa-! dena. Astronomers around the world! watched the Light rain fell on the riders lyjand wagons as the journey be- Wgan Sunday morning, and con- .inued much of the day, adding Reds Stage Daring Raid to nobody's comfort. They headed toward historic Mission Valley, where cattle herds once passed native stock grazing lush ranges. Along the way they made several rest slops, on land once trod by fierce Indians refusing early SAIGON, South Viet Nam'civni'zalion's attempts to educate Viet Cong Christianize (hem. lion squad slashed ils way into "cai'v and a little saddle sore Hits Bridge i Beav an American military compound after the first day's riding, the St o died Siturdav Jo Died balm day night when, 1111L 1 ItlllJ LI 111 LCI] HI 11 early Monday, hurling grenades lra" busters gathered around an officers' billet Slmda-v evening, en- ling one American the fellowship of their woundii II was Ihe first time uu: mi-gei area in nipklln inin nl was lne "rst ln "'el" ?arrner.Sl Entertainment hopes of seeing a flash of light hM, 1 h history of this war that a from Ranger's impact or tr 5 list guerrillas have The schedule Monday called aOOUl JO milCS WCSI 01 _ r_ for evprvnno In i-ic, cloud raised in (he dust which is thought to cover the dry seas there. Small Flash But the world's biggest tele-., scope, the 200-incher at Ml. on jiim. ville. John Chavez, 40, was kilted Saturday in Dallas when walls of a deep sewer excavation tum- lomar in Southern California, couldn't spot anything. The only Ihing close to a sighting was one reported by Dr. Kal Rakas, who said his 21- inch reflector at Lowell Observ- atory, Flagstaff, Ariz., showed a small flash 50 or 60 miles from Ihe area no seconds prior (See MOON, Page 5) An Irving woman, Mrs. Ruby Whitlock, 69, was killed and her husband injured Saturday night in a two-car accident near Irv- ing. Tcen-Agcr Shot were taken in police ambu- lances. 'ertwig estimated damage to the burned out electrical Moon Target Hit Hailed by British such a daring raid in force on an American compound. It oc- curred in Uie city of Kontum, 260 miles northeast of Saigon in the heart of South Viet N'am's central mountain plateau. Two of the guerrillas were shot and killed by an American sentry, Spe. Gale D. Fu'nn, 24, Fowler, Kan. Nine Vietnamese civil guards who were detailed to guard Ihei for everyone to rise at" 5 a.m. and leave the valley two hours later on a journey through Upper Meyersville lo an evening slop three miles past Yorktown. They were lo be guesls at an 8 p.m. dance at the Yorktown Community Hall. Today's Chuckle Of SIICCCSS (s have a not Police gunfire in Dallas kiiicdjMililary Assistance Advisory a teen-age burglary suspect andlkroup compound were absent p r o b 1 e m to handle hiit a companion official leave during Ihe whether ls sTme pro n i incinpni i__ _ lined by the fact that it Is now wounded Sunday in a cafe. Dead was incident. Guadalupe Silva, 17. A compan- ion received a leg wound in the police shotgun barrage. Henry Riddle, 52, of Houston was shot to death Saturday after what police called an argument between him and a neighbor. King Edward Vincent, 30, was shot lo death in Houston early Saturday. Police chaiged his un- cle with murder wilhoul malice. lem you hart lasl year. SINGLE FATALITY director (if tlio institute from its inception in until his retirc- menl in succumbed Satur- day in a .sanitarium to what was described ailments. Atkinson, finding a dcarlli of literature for Ihe blind, started itanai.t (o trark a( a monlh as1 a cowboy on an older brother's cuttle ranch. (Sec NIGHT, Page 5) Mine years later a revolver a complication and burning powder scared his face, blinding him. went (o live with his mother, his Rr.iille prinlfhop in the ga- rage of his Los Angeles home. Now (he institute, two blocks long on Vermont Avenue, prints thousands of books read by fin- gertip and sends them to blind persons throughout the country. Tlio nonprofit, nonseclarian corporation also prints maga- zines in Braille. A social-service department conducts oricnta- tinn-lo-hlindness and other pro- grams. There arc classes in Braille, loom weaving, word sludy and recreational pursuits. Asked once what happens when blindness conies, Atkinson told an interviewer: "Then you learn lo ho blind. It's something then residing in El Centro, and studied Braille. In 1919, he was in Los Angeles when a wealthy Brooklinc, Mass., couple, Mr. and Mrs. John M. Longycar, visited him, They persuaded him to accept to start his organization to help the blind. Atkinson, who had married his secretary, recalled: "We used Ihc garage as a prinlcry and the breakfast room as a bindery." He had R Braille portable typcsyrilcr made lo his design. It prints with six raised dots on special paper. Atkinson also published, for (Sen BUA1LLE, Page 5) Coimally Filing Fee One Today AUSTIN, Tex. (AP) Gov. John Connally said Sunday there is no great significance in his not having paid his filing fee for the Democratic Primary last Thursday as scheduled. "Monday is ample Connnlly said in a statement an aide gave newsmen. "I don't think loo many conclusions should he drawn from il" (the Ihc statement said. Connally had announced some Ranger fi on Uie moon 30 sec- onds after the time predicted by the American scientists who launched it. Sir Bernard Ixwell, director at .lodrell Bank, told reporters: think this represents a very great achievement for Ameri- can rocket engineers." Kenneth Galland, vice chairman of the British Inler- planelary Society, said it was unfortunate that the cameras in Hanger failed lo function nt the approach to the moon. "I should say this is one of the most bitter disappointments of Ihc space age so far in hav- ing come so near lo success in a vital he said. time ago that he would seek ai Lovell said Jodrell Bank had second term, but when he did not pay his filing fee lasl Thurs- day as announced there was much speculation about the gov- ernor's plans. been tracking the beacon sig nals only of the American rock- et and had no information con- cerning television pictures. "This achievement is undcr- shown Americans were able lo deal with the guidance tech- nique, and the success of Saturn J, the satellite sent tip Wednesday, indicated they overcoming the problem of lift- Gatland, on his part, remind- ed reporters that the launching was delayed last year because defective transistors were found in the guidance system. He thought there was a faint chance Ihe probe had hit a meteorite, bill that the most likely reason for (he cameras' failing lo work could have beei Alfonso Cabrera, 17, was found Fewer Alarms Received By Firemen During '63 City firemen answered the k e r o s e n e lamp overturned. jn 12 with Ihe decrease! The fire officials staled thai wr, mir-r T-A v a sharp estimated value of damaged THE WEATHER 15 'T "rCS contents by insV n, [ante inside the city limits was Out of the 518 alarms an-, with 582 726 37 of the Mostly cloudy Monday and swcrcd by fire units in 1963 bosses being paid Tuesday, with occasional light; 142 were beyond the city limits'- Sirmon said a 'detailed list ol ram turning colder compared to 224 record- damage caused by the 1963 f re Mostly east and southeast wmds.brcaking county runs out of a will be made aw'ilabla 6 to 16 m p.h .shifting to norUi-jtotal of 584 alarms in 1962, ac- March 1 when he confers with crly 15 lo 25 m.p.h. Monday, cording to statistics released State Fire Insurance Board of Expected Monday by Fire Chief Casev'fieials in A Low 52, high 60 South Central Texas: MosllyiSirmon. ones and Fire Marshal George' There were ill residential fircs in 1861 as rnmnirm (V, i- compared lo 8c doudy Monday and Tuesday.! A reduction in grass fires was in %2 Light rain cast and south Mon-jlhe main reason for Ihe county: A breakdown of the 1963 total day. Colder North Monday andjalarm decline. The county total shows that there were fou south by night. High Monday is made up mostly of grass fire alarms involving churches 50-66 SOUth. rilv ftrflco _____ _ fa IKIJUILUIA. i r a' os to lo stick or a [my component to 50-66 south calls. City grass fires also and schools Temperatures Sunday: Low fewer in 1003 with 72 alarms aslmcrchantilc building one manu" V !S r to for the previousifacturing building (wo slorace Tides (Port Layaca Porliyear. [buildings, six public u tu Galland believes a probe piiHovel: 30.05. i m nature. 93 involvinc cars p.m., and a.m. Tuesday, iactivity in previous years with and other vehicles M f a I s e Barometric pressure at scaithe exception of 1962. In 1001, alarms and 33 calis'made for around Ihe moon before making it crash-land would have ena- bled the Americans lo send sig- nals correcting the fault. He said the 10 minutes before (See TAHf.ET, Page 5) --v-i ...in ctnii niritlt were iS coimly alarms, cmercencv and fira niri Rainfall Sunday: .03. Total for 48 in 1960, 90 in 1959, 87 in year: 2.06 inches. Sunset Monday sunrise Tuesday Tim Information based on data from Hie U.S Weather Bureau Victoria Offlce. and 47 in 1957. Busiest month was in August Walter Tucker, 87, of 2006 when 56 alarms were answered Pleasant Green Drive, was the with Ihc lightest month being one fire fatality for the when only 21 calls [Ho died on Dec. 23 when a received. City-Wide Dollar Days Today and Tuesday   

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