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Advocate: Thursday, January 30, 1964 - Page 1

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - January 30, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 118th 265 TELEPHONE HI 5-1451 Protest Over Jet Rejected by Reds VICTORIA, TEXAS, THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 1964 Established 1849 U.S. Plane Shot Down; Trio Killed Capital Angry With Incident WIESBADEN, Germany (AP) Moscow disclosed Wednesday that a U.S. Air Force jet trainer that disappeared Tuesday over East Germany was forced down by a Soviet fighter and all three American officers aboard were killed. Washington said the unarmed T39 was shot down and Secre- tary of Slate Dear. Rusk called It "a shocking and senseless act." The Slate Department protest- ed vigorously, But the Russians rejected the protest and termed the flight of the twin-jet a "gross provocation" and a "clear in- trusion." In Stiff Note The fate of the trainer was disclosed in a sliff note re- leased in Moscow accusing U.S. military authorities of trying to aggravate the situation in cen- tral Europe. After the plane took off from Wiesbaden Air Force Base it was tracked by radar for 11 min- utes as it flew into East Ger- many. The Stale Department said the plane was unarmed, ob- viously lost, and "afforded no threat of any sort to the So- viets." The Air Force in Wiesbaden said the trainer apparently strayed into East Germany be- because it had been forced to fly high above a storm. Claims Intrusion Georgi M. Kornienko, minisler of the Soviet Embassy in Wash- ington, told newsmen, "It was a clear intrusion; the plane was intercepted and then it did not Pilots, PTA Set For Dimes March Final plans have been mapped for the Mothers March Friday night, probably the best known phase of annual March of Dimes held to combat birth defects and arthritis. The drive will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. under the sponsorship of the Pilot Club of Victoria with the co- operation of elementary school obey two orders.' The immediate reaction in to believe ]osf. Congress was of anger, but Sen. Barry Goldwater told a news conference in Pittsburgh on Wednesday night it was "hard the plane really got "I don't know what they were doing over East the Arizona senator and Republican presidential contender said. He added he did not see what the U.S. government could be be- yond lodging a protest. Earlier in the day, Gen. Paul (See PLANE, Page 7) Film Star Ladcl Dies PALM SPRINGS, Calif. (AP) Alan Ladd, who rose from a movie laborer to a 000-a-week sliir, died Wednes- day, apparently of a heart at- tack. Ladd, 50, a man Horatio Al- gcr would have loved, was found dead in bed by his butler. The actor had been in Palm Springs for 10 days recupera- ting from a knee injury. Former actress Sue' Carol Ladd's wife of 22 years, was al (he couple's West Los Angeles home when told of the death. Dick Dunn in Dallas for a seminar Morris Lazor look ing for a friend to go to lunch with Al I'rukop getting a shine Millnu Itippamont and .Frank Wagner comparing dried deer sausage in s m a 1 quantities Lydia Gabrysch spraying a black "possom" will a garden hose only to cliscovei it was a skunk and getting stung by a scorpion at the same time Charles McCalley with son out for a late lunch Maureen McCue finding old Victoria his tory most fascinating Mrs Gladys Berkman learning some words from her parrot, while trying to teach it others Charley Rrandcs having friends in a state of confusion while at tending to some business Milton Gohlke marking a birth day and his co-workers compli menling jokes proudly showing off his sons, one age 15 months, one age six days Warren Nelson preferring those long, long automobiles that get him places in a hurry Mrs. Clark Hancly proving as efficient at driving a pickup as she is with office matters the Leslie Monlags making quick trip ko San Antonio. Area Still Lags In Poll Taxes H became more and more apparent late Wednesday thai Vlclorifl County very likely will go right down to the deadline Frlilny night before determining whether or not its 1064 voting poten- tial of will be ade- quately represented In poll taxes paid and exemption certificates issued. Tax Assessor Collector H. Campbell Dodsoa said at the close of business Wednesday tliat a (ofal of poll (ax receipts have now been issued, along with exemption certificates, an increase over-all of about 500 above the pre- vious day. Dortson sold that quite a number of additional poll lax payments are anticipat- ed in reports which have not yet been made by spec- ical deputies. Even so, the tax office is hopeful that a tremendous rush of busi- ness during (lie last two days will bring the totals up somewhere In the neighbor- hood of the voting potential. The tax office will he kept open until 9 p.m. Friday, the final clay for obtaining a poll tax receipt of exemp- tion certificate for voting in state, county and all local elections (uring 1964. Bookmobile Available to Everyone Both urban and rural resi- dents of Victoria County will be given a full opportunity to vitness the two-day demonstra- ion and showing of a Texas State Library bookmobile in ap- >earances Thursday and Fri- lay sponsored by the Victoria Jroiile Public Library. The bookmobile will be in all day Thursday, giv- ng demonstrations at five con- venient locations, and on Fri- day it will be taken on a tour of the county with stops at Telferner, Bloominglon, Mission Valley and Nursery. This specially designed and 'ully-equipped rolling library is icing brought to Victoria for he purpose of demonstrating low its services can be utilized to the advantage of rural and suburban readers of all ages and interests. Trained representatives of the state library will be on hand .0 explain all operations of the Mokmobile.and to answer ques- .ions as to how such a serv- ice plight be made, available in Victoria County. The two-day bookmobile schedule here has been an nounced by Mrs. Joe Petty of the Bookmobile Publicity Com- mittee as follows: mothers. Miss Novaline Jowell, com- munity service chairman for the Pilot Club, is general chairman of the Mothers March. Chief of Police John Guseman las pledged full police protec- :ion for volunteers in the drive. Several schools will be open to receive collections from the marching mothers in their door-to-door campaigns. Schools To Open Schools to be open during the drive will be F. W. Gross, Juan Linn, Mitchell, O'Connor, Smith Shields, Starily and William Of- fer. Hopkins School workers will make fheir collections ear- lier in the afternoon, while Aloe ind Wood Hi will also hold their campaign earlier. The Optimist Youth Center at 800 E. Pine will serve as the central collection station. All volunteers in the drive can be easily identified by identifi cation badges. The entire membership of the Pilot Club will participate in the drive, with approximately 75 per cent of the members making house-to-house calls, and the balance of the membership assisting at the schools, Following is a list of schools, PTA, chairmen and Pilot Club representatives: and Mrs. Allan But- ler, PTA chairmen. .F. W. Gross-Mr, and Mrs. Edwin Ganl, PTA chairmen. Hopkins Officials Beatrice Trevi- no, school chairman, and Mrs. Norma Arnold, Pilot represen- tative. Juan Irene Ted- For Thursday: a.m. to a.m., De Leon Plaza. a.m. to p.m., Tot- (Scc BOOKMOBILE, Page 7) U.S. Leaps Ahead With Saturn Shot Huge Payloatl Makes Orbit CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. (AP) The great Saturn 1 rocket pro- jelled into orbit the world's heaviest satellite on Wednesday ind space officials said the filt- ering success vaulted the Jnited States ahead in fire pow- ir in the race for the moon. After the colossal rocket, with 1.5 million pounds of booster :hrust, shoved a satellite weigh .ng pounds into space.Dr. Robert Seamans, associate ad- ministrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Admin slration, told a news confer- ence: "There is no question that :oday's flight put us ahead of Russia in the capability of launching heavy payloads." Milestone to Moon Dr. Weraher von Braun, di< rector of the Marshall Space Flight Center, which is develop- ing the Saturn family of rock- its, hailed the success P? a tone in man's efforts to reach he moon. We now are ahead of the Russians in cargo-carrying abil- he added. "They have or- bited payloads on the order of pounds. Saturn 1 gives us he capability of orbiting o useful pounds." He noled that Wednesday's extra weight was due to the sec- md stage remaining attached. 't will be separated on other 'lights. Johnson Watches President Johnson watched .he launching on a television set in his White House office in Washington and then issued a statement describing it as a "giant step forward for the 26 Pages Saigon in Turmoil As Coup Reversed United States space effort." Johnson, declaring it was the largest payload ever launched 3y any nation, said, this country las now "proved we have the capability of putting great pay- loads into space." He congratU' space team on be- "grateful and proud lafed the naif of a nation." Phones Blockhouse After the 164-foot, 562-ton rock- et had thundered away from Cape Kennedy with an ear-split- ting roar, Johnson phoned the (See SATURN, Page 7) ham, Pilot representative. Charles Bak- er P.TA. chairman, and Miss Helen Alexander, Pilot. Ruth Sitterle, (See MARCH, Page 7) Charge Filed In Cqllisioii Frederick (Ted) Shields, a local physician, was charged in county court Wednesday with aggravated assault with a mo- tor vehicle as police complelec their investigation of a Satur- day night traffic accident in the 3600 block of North Main Street. The charge was based on a complaint signed by Police Lt Robert Gisler and filed with County Atty. W. W. Kilgore. Dr. Shields and Frank Kelso, 54, of 1602 Crockett Ave., were injured in the flaming collision with the latter suffering firs! and second degree burns over his face and on his right hand His cai- caught fire on being struck from behind while both vehicles were headed north, ac- cording to the police investiga- tion. He is in Citizens Memorial Hospital. The physician has been re leased from Victoria Hospita where he was treated for a head laceration and a concus sion. Shields is expected to pos1 bond of on the charge Thursday. The charge, filed in county court, is a misdemeanor RESEARCH RESULT Unskilled Labor Supply Seen High in This Area him with practical Donald Hathaway The board of trustees and administration of Victoria Col- lege have received the results of a survey conducted by a nine-man research team of the University of Texas in an at- tempt to determine if a need exists for broadening trie in- stitution's technical and voca- tional curriculum. Their findings indicate Victo- ria County has a considerable supply of untrained labor. The team conducted a series of personnel interviews with administrators of 25 firms. From Ihe information Ihcy obtained, they compiled manpower fig- ures for a five-year period ending in 1068. Their estimated figure f o r total five-year manpower de- mands created by attrition and industrial expansion was persons. No consideration was ;iven to personnel transferring from one job to another. A breakdown of (he estimate indicates a demand during that period for 357 professional pie, 115 semi-professional, 376 managerial, 866 clerical, 394 sales personnel, 846 service peo- ple, 570 in skilled jobs, semi-skilled and 303 unskilled. The report also indicated that if industrial opportunities in- volving suitable working con- ditions and paying competitive wages were to become avail- able, the present labor force ratio of about 47.9 per cent of the population over 14 years of age could be raised to per cent, "a reasonable potential participation The source would provide between and workers with a large percentage of them women. They noted in the report that job opportunities for women are scarce in the Victoria area, with a potential for this group yet to be developed. Following are some of t h e observations and conclusions of the team. A cooperative program was suggested between (he local LABOR, T) RECEIVE CERTIFICATES Two members of Selective Service Board No. 125 received recognition Wednes- day from Col. Morris S. Schwartz, center, State Selective Service direc- tor, in a short ceremony in the Fed- (Advocate Photo) era! Building. From left are Antonio C. Morfin, who received a certifi- cate and a lapel pin for 15 years service; Col. Schwartz, and Louis R, Kolle Jr., chairman, who received a certificate for 10 years service. Draft Board Officials Here Cited Certificates of appreciation signed by the late President John F. Kennedy were pre- sented to two members of Se- lective Service Board No. 125 an informal ceremony Wednesday morning in the Fed- eral Building. Col, Morris S. Schwartz, State Selective Service director, pre- sented a certificate for 15 years service to Antonio C. Morfin, and Louis R. Kolle Jr., board chairman, received one for 10 years service. In addition, Morfin received a lapel pin. Schwartz praised both, as well as other board members, for their time and energy in deciding board matters for a period of years. In a humorous vein, he commented that "when- ever board members ask for it, they get a 100 per cent hike in salary." Board members here, as everywhere, receive no pay. The board has jurisdiction in Victoria, Calhoun and Refugio Counties. Also attending the meeting was E. G. Sparks of Refugio, whose official acceptance on the board is pending. He replaces C. S. Boone of Woodshoro, who also was present, and whose resignation became effective last month after approximately 10 years service. Othev board members other U.S. Talks With Panama Cave In WASHINGTON (AP) The Panamanian diploma ma charged Wednesday nightisaid he asked that the OAS cal than those already mentioned are F. F. Montier of Port La- vaca, and Vernon Barnes of Victoria. Maj. E. A. Hoppe, chief of (he field division of State Se- lective Service headquarters, accompanied Col. Schwartz on the Victoria visit. :he United States had commit-1 :ed aggression- against its ci- vilian population and asked for a conference of hemisphere for- eign ministers. Miguel Moreno, Panama's ambassador to the Organization of American States, delivered the request in OAS Secretary- General Jose A. Mora in a two- minute ceremony at OAS head- quarters. Moreno declared: "We have searched for a dig- nified solution to the controver- sy but unfortunately and in spite of the good offices of the Inter-American Peace Commit- tee and our willingness we have achieved no success." a foreign ministers conferenc as soon as possible. 'Earlier, Moreno reporte< talks conducted by the commit tee had collapsed. Shortly before the breakdown President Johnson conferrec with leaders of both parties on the developing crisis. The President and State De partment aides gave the leader a report on efforts to arrive a an agreement with the Panama nian government of Presiden Roberto Chiari. The Peace Committee me Wednesday afternoon but wa unable to break the deadlock be (See U.S., Page 7) Bloodless lebellion Short-Lived Nov. 1 Junta Again Ruling SAIGON, South Viet Nam (AP) outh Viet Nam's government vas in confusion Thursday fol- owing a bloodless military coup nd reports of a swift counter oup. The first coup was reported arried out under the leader- lip of Maj. Gen. Nguyen :hanh, 38, commander of the ietnamese army's 1st Corps. e was supported by Maj. Gen.  is strong man brother, Ngo linh Nhu. They included Maj. Gsn Tran Van Don, second in command of the junta and de- ense minister; Maj. Gen. La Van Kim, third in command of he junta and armed forces chief of staft; and Maj, Gen. Mai Huu Xuan, chief of Viet Nam's va- rious police establishments. Then, according to reports ram the Interior Ministry and other sources, there was a swift counter coup and the four lead- ers of the first coup were jailed. Four Battalions Most top police officials also were reported under arrest. Saigon was occupied before dawn by four battalions of rebel marines and four battalions of rebel airborne troops men in by armor. But not a shot was fired. The revolt led by Nguyen Khanh was reported over within an hour. At noon, Maj. Gen. Duong Van Minh, the provisional chief of state and commander of the mil- itary junta since Nov. 1, was at (See SAIGON, Page 7) Young Farmer Award Scheduled by Jaycees Victoria Junior Chamber of Commerce's Outstanding Young Farmer award recipient will be give the welcome, and Rev. Eu announced at a 7 p.m. banquet Thursday in Jaycee Hall. Following the presentation, Dewey P. Compton, a Houston radio farm director noted for his down-tc-earlh language and homespun method of delivery, will address the banquet crowd. The OYF award will be pre- sented by Robert Thomas, chair- Today's Chuckle A small hoy's ambition: To grow up to be a farmer so he can get paid for not raising spinach. man of the awards committee Mayor Kemper Williams Jr. wil gene O'Callaghan, assistant pas tor of Our Lady of Victor Church, the invocation. The selection of the winnini young farmer is based on th degree of progress in his ag riculture career, the extent o good soil and natural resourc conservation practices he ha used and the significance of hi contribution to the well-being o tile community, state and na tion. Jaycees were busy Wednes day selling tickets. Tickets ma; also be purchased at the doo for The general public ha been invited to attend. THE WEATHER Mostly cloudy with occasional rain Thursday and B'riday. East to southeasterly winds 15 to 25 m.p.h. Expected Thursday tem- peratures: Lev.- 55, high 65. South Central Texas: Mostly cloudy Thursday and Friday. Occasional rain and thunder- showers. Cloudy and cooler northwest Friday afternoon. High Thursday 58-74. Temperatures Wedn e s d a y: Low 55, high 66. Rainfall: Trace. Tides (Port Lavaca-Port O'Connor Lows at a.m. and p.m. Highs at p.m. and at a.m. on Friday. Barometric pressure at sea level: 30.22. Sunset Thursday: Sun- rise Friday: This Information based on data from the U.S. Weather Bureau Victoria Office (See Weather Elsewhere, rage 2) BEAUTY MILE Highway Depart- ment personnel Lester Tait and Emll Pipfjert put the finishing touches on the planting of a tree in the divided section of (he BJoomingfon Highway southeast of Victoria, a joint project of department and the Chamber (Advocate Photo) of Commerce's Victoria Beautiful Committee. Watching the planting are Richard L. Goodwin, chairman of the committee, and John Alkek Jr., the chairman last year when the project was originated. BEAUTY MILE Plants on Esplanade Serve Useful Purpose Victoria's "Beauty Mile' moved a step closer to reality this week when the Texas High- way Department began planting approximately 275 frees and shrubs in the center section of the divided highway between the city limits and the Du Pont Plant cutoff road on the Bloom- ington Highway. The idea originated last year with the Victoria Chamber of Commerce's Victoria Beautiful Committee, which donated the trees and shrubs for the pro- gram, and is being carried out under the supervision of the Highway Department, which is responsible for the actual plant- ing and care of the plants. The program will provide a scenic approach to the south- eastern section of the city, and will serve a well. Uichard L. functional use ns Goodwin, chair- man of the Victoria Beautiful Committee, said the plan has been studied by Lester Pruelt of Austin, a landscape architect for the Highway Department. "Besides adding lo the beauty of the Goodwin said, "Pruelt designed a plan so that certain trees and shrubs are being planted in key areas so they will help reduce the glare of lights of on-coming cars at night." The Highway Department chose Anaqua, Bald Cypress, Desert Willow, Mimosa and Red Bud Trees, Pampas Grass and Oleander and Vitcx Shrubs for the program. The actual plant- ing is being supervised by 0. G. Marling, a maintenance super- intendent for the Highway De- partment. Goodwin and John Alkek Jr., the past chairman of the com- niiltce, said Ihe tentative plans now under study call for (ho eventual extension of the pro- gram all the way to Blooming- ton,   

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