Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Advocate Newspaper Archive: January 17, 1964 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Advocate

Location: Victoria, Texas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Advocate (Newspaper) - January 17, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 118th 253 TELEPHONE HJ 5-1451 VICTORIA, TEXAS, FRIDAY, JANUARY. 17, 1964 Established 18U 12 Cents Panamanian Glenn Quits Space Job, Senator Post Civilian Rule Back in Zone PANAMA domestic political dispute shaped up Thursday over Panama's de- mand for a new Canal Zone treaty and the U.S. govern- ment's stand for discussion, not negotiation, of issues affecting the relationship of the two na- tions. At the same time, high sources in American and Pana- manian official quarters said there was a glimmer of hope for a formula that might reopen the door. Not Wilh Pressure In Washington, however, Sec- retary of State Dean Rusk told members of the Senate Foreigi Relations Commtltoo the Uniiec States is unwilling to negotiate or discuss differences with Pan ama "under pressure or threat of violence." Chairman Manuel Trucco o the joint subcommittee operat ing under auspices of the peace commission of the Organization of American States conferre arty at the Continental Inn 2702 Houston Highway. Another pre-trial conference is also slated Friday in the Luis Calzada Gonzales murder case which is scheduled for tria on Jan. 27, At a Jan..3 hear ing, Stephen Guiltard was ap pointed by Kelly to serve counsel for Gonzales who charged with fatally shooting his brother, Ramon Gonzales, a the latler's residence on Aug. Also Friday, 26 other crimi nal cases are scheduled for tria before Judge Kelly. The pro ceedings are slated to get un derway at 9 a.m. 'Fidelistas9 Plan March A Castro type march down Victoria's Main Street has been planned by the Jun- ior Chamber of Commerce for 20 a.m. Saturday as part of a promotion to urge lo- cal citizens to obtain poll tax receipts in order to vote. Approximately a dozen Jaycces, dressed as Castro troopers and complete with beards wil! carry signs or banners "to impress upon the public that only 90 miles from the Florida coast lies a Communistic government where people cannot vote or have a voice in their gov- ernment." Jerry M a u e r is chair- man of the Jaycees poll tax campaign and Sammy Green, co-chairman. Assist- ing are Marcus Hermes, Jack Bob Bomers- bach and Don Weber. Plat Given New Study By Planners But Approval Delayed Again Victoria Planning Commission again considered Thursday the sreliminary plat for a proposed 112 lot subdivision adjacent :o Highland Estates, to bo  ehalf of Warren Ball and the Rev. J. L. Franks. Large Ditch A large ditch which will run along two sides and part of a :hird side of the proposed sub- division will empty in a natura drainage channel which run through another subdivision am eventually into Spring Creek. Commissioners, led by Com missioner John Folger, closely questioned Seale as to whethe the natural drainage channe through the adjacent subdivision will be adequate to contain th increased runoff water when U.S. Envoy Held Under Arrest by Zanzibar Junta DOA7 YARBOROUGH Gonzalez Asks 'Threat' Probe WASHINGTON (AP) The office of Hep. Henry Gonzalez, D-Tex., confirmed Thursday the congressman had asked Ally. Gen. Robert Kennedy to inves- tigate a group which he said has made a "thinly veiled threat" against him in a publication. Gonzalez' office identified the group as the Minutemen and said the threat against him and 19 other Democratic congress- men was in "On a pub- lication of the group. The Houston Post quoted Gon- zalez in a copyrighted story Wednesday as saying the Ihreal was directed at him and the others who voted against the House un-American Activities Committee last year. He said 'the publication on March 15, 1B6, contained the names of the 20 congressmen bordered in black and headet Cuero Resident Acquires State Farm Bureau Post with the riam.11 words: "In Memo Kathryn Heights is developed Seale said he felt that would. The drainage facilities wer ;hen tentatively approved, bu Folger called On the commi; sion to obtain an over a topography study of fhe are from which the commissip could develop a general draii age program for the rapidl developing area. Heavily Populated Provision for thoroughfar right of way also came a the insistence of Folger, w h said he feared the area woul soon develop into a heavil populated area into w h i c .here would be no major tra iic artery. This is the same area over which commissioners have ex- pressed concern about the mul- tiplicity of septic tanks, but: there was no indication Thurs- day that the commission ex- pects lo insist on a central sewage disposal system. At the beginning of the meet- ing Seale presented a report on Hat Held Ready For Fair Wind AUSTIN (AP) Houston: attorney Don Yarborough said Thursday he will decide in a ew days whether to challenge Gov. John Connally in this year's Democratic primary. Some political observers see a Yarborough-Connally race as ending the armistice between Texas liberal and conservative Democrats that became appar- ent shortly after President Lyn- don Johnson took office. "I believe in harmony but 1 also believe in the Democratic Yarborough told a news conference. ocratic Party would be effected by a race in the Democratic primary. There should be diver- ;ent views within tiie stata par There have been reports thai f Yarborough files against Con- nally, then Texas conservative Democrats are likely to field a strong opponenl against U.S. Sen. Ralph Yarborough, D-Tex. U.S. Rep. Joe Kilgore, D-Tex., reportedly is seriously consider- ing Ihe Senate race. Kilgore, a close friend of Connally, has op- posed Sen. Yarborough on nu- ieve the harmony in the Dem- Insurgents Nab Consul At Gunpoint Four Reporters Also Detained don't be- merous issues. There also are (See HAT, Page T) Inez MOD Plans Call for Party Plans are under way in Inez for the annual March of Dimes project, which is simultaneous- ly, a dance, an auction, a com- munity supper, and a general Advocate Cuero Bureau CUERO Wayne Little, area :ield representative for the Tex- as Farm Bureau since 1951, las been appointed state organ- zational director. He succeeds Millard Shivers who has re- signed lo seek the Democratic nomination for Stale Agriciillure Commissioner. Little, a resident of Cuero for 13 years, assumed his new du- ties Wedenesday in Waco. His replacement as area tative has not yel been named. Announcement of Little's pro- motion was made Thursday by C. H. Devaney, Texas Farm Bureau president. Little is a native of Elkart, Texas, where he was gradu- ated from high school. He re- ceived a bachelor's degree from Texas University in 1938 and 'worked for the U.S. Field and Wildlife Service before be- Roland Timtcrlakd and t h e Rev. Robert Bonncr still lalk-j Board Sets Bid Opening Boll Harlman explaining to friends thai preparations of meat for cooking is his specially BennleFarher reporting Ivvo inches of rainfall on his farm al Guadalupe. .anil Bob Dunn cheering Ihe rain on. Dr. Charles Borchers convinced that winter is not over yel. .Mrs. Alton Joosl satisfied al finally having a mystery solved. Mrs. Claire Diczcl prefering days thai make business busier .Mrs. Edna Kile curious about how fast news gels around. J. F. McCoy Jr. preferring warmer weather for children's appointments. .Jake Sdilein a bit under the weather. .Ihc B. M. Dugals of Kingsville in town for two days. .Kenneth Bay offering some personalized service during this bad weather .Burrel Jones Jr. in an un- usually serious mood. .M r s. F. X. Rippamonti finding a lonely spot in her home since her 14 year old parakeet, Cap- tain, died recently. .Wallace Buckert in a hurry to replace the windshield on his new pick- up. .George Campbell happy to find his misplaced notes. Mr. and Mrs, Don Chapman spotting her uncle on TV when the U. S. Davis Cup team vis ited President Lyndon Johnson The uncle Is Edward A. Tur vllle, president of U. S. Lawn Tennis Association, who accom panied the nelters lo the Whiti House. School Structure By MARY BAKER PHILLIPS Advocate Port l.avaca BuTCflU PORT LAVACA The dis- rict school board Thursday night announced a bid opening or the erection of additions to he administrative building will be held Jan. 30 at 8 p.m. Plans and specifications may be ob- .ained from the office ot Chris- topher DiStcfano and Associates in Victoria. The board scheduled an in-1 spcction trip Friday at 1 p.m. :o inspect Seadrift and Harrison elementary schools prior to ac- ceptance. A. F. Drexler of Drexlcr Construction Co., in :om men ling upon the status of the new high school construc- tion, stated that installalion of locker and lab equipment was holding up completion. Dr. J. Lyle Hill released a recent Idler announcing a new contract with Central Power and Light Co. The new agree- ment stated that the company would combine the melev read- Ings at Harrison and Jefferson Elementary Schools, Travis Junior High School, the school district office, and district maintenance office for the pur- pose of billing. Based on last year's usuage, this will result in a savings of approximately annually. Announcement was also made that the new of- fice building may be includec in this agreement when th building is completed. In other actions, the board ap proved the following personne recommendation: resignations Mrs. Helen Whiling, Mrs. Beth Stokes, Mrs. Judy Munnerlyn Miss Elaine Baugh and Mrs Judy Hood, who is currently on a one-year leave of absence. Elections Mrs. Glenda Fay Geryk, Vernon Kostohryz, wh is now on leave of absence i Mexico, Miss Nancy Lee Bagb and Mrs. Belly Skellon. Approved change orders a Calhoun Higli School in amoun of for addition of tw doors and door frames leadin into science area, and i Port O'Connor School for raL ing the stage to a level equa to that at Crockett Junior High Tabled the decision on th food handling problems at th sladium concessions stands fo further study. Suggestion wa also made lhat Clayton Toalson city-county sanitarian, and representative from the ban boosters meet with the boar for a discussion on the sladium Larry Dio, board preslden presented a written statemen to the board refuting what h termed accusations mad against him by W. H. Baue and asked thai II be records in the minutes. iming an infantryman in World 'ar II. After being discharged as a aptain in .1945, Little worked the Continental Oil Co. ant in Rio Grande City and as later employed by the Val- y Farm Bureau. He Joined the Texas Farm, ureau in Waco in 1948 as a eld man in the organizational epartment. It was in 1951 that e moved to Cuero after being ppointed area field representa- ve. Mrs. Little and son, Derek, junior in Cuero High School, ill remain in Cuero until the nd of the current school year, hen they mil move to Waco. Ir. and Mrs. Little also have daughter, Mrs. M. W. Brack- n, who resides in San Antonio nth her husband who is in the f.S. Air Force. While a resident of Cuero, Lil- le was active in First Metho- ist Church. results of percolation tests which his firm, Lowry and Seale, conducted at the request of the planning board. 24 Test Holes Seale said 24 test holes were dug, and each tested "from two :o foui' times" in accordance with Stale Health Department specifications. The average rate of absorption in all cases mel :he minimum state require- ments, Seale said. Folger again expressed con- cern, however, when Seale saic that porous soil gives way to clay strata at about 20 inches below the surface, but he made no recommendation. Attorney Don Edwards s a t through most of the 90-minute hearing and said that he hac appeared to hear the commis sion decision on enforcement o subdivision ordinance provisions in the area lying two to fiv d that Donald K. Petterson, a hird secretary in the U.S. Em- )assy, also was arrested. It said the two diplomats were be- ieved under house arrest.) The incident in the Zanzibar ?otel came after Karume vio- lently denounced the U.S. atti- tude to the nesv Republic of Zan- zibar. The United Slates has not recognized the new regime which overthrew the Sullan of Zanzibar last Sunday. Under Holel Arrest Placed under arrest in their hotel rooms were John Nugent of Newsweek, William Smith ot Time magazine, Robert Conley of the New York Times and Peter Rand of the New York Herald Tribune, reached Zanzibar moyp, Tanganyika. They had from Baga- Today's Chuckle Why isn't there an effec- tive reducing tablet for in- come Inx figures? School Opens Furniture Bids Bids were opened Thursday in nine different items of fumi- ure which will be used to equip he new 56-room addition at Vic- oria High School when classes Heavy Snowfall in State Deadly But Also Valuable ipen next fall. Assistant Business Manager Jack Daniels said the total pur-; chases were expected to run ap-' iroximately although he bids will not be let until sometime next week. The furniture includes several different types of student chairs, eachers' desks and chairs, folding chairs, file cabinets and waste paper baskels. Represen- tatives from eight different com- panies were at the bid open- ing, Daniels said. Markers Okayed For Texas Sites AUSTIN (AP) The Texas State Historical Survey Com- mittee said Thursday lhat seven official historical markers have been authorized for Texas sites connected with the last three U S, presidents. Three markers were ordered for placing at or near the place of the assassination of Presiden John F. Kennedy in Dallas, a or near the place of Kennedy's last publjc speech in For; Worth, and al or near (he site 01 Kennedy's campaign appear anct in Houston In 1960. (In New York, Time maga- zine and the New York Times said they had reports that Smith and Conley had been released.) Karume, who had just re- :urned from Dar es Salaam where he had pleaded for assist- ance from the Tanganyikan government, was in a rage when he stormed into the Zanzibar Hotel. Read Dispatches While in Dar es Salaam, the rebel leader apparently had read dispatches filed by the cor- respondents to their publications and he was visibly angry at their arrival here. The four newsmen arrived hi Zanzibar by dhow, and Indian Ocean sailboat. Most of the foreign newsmen who have reached Zanzibar since the weekend revolt have managed to get ashore from dhows. Some even swam ashore. The journalists have set up an unofficial press headquarters in the Zanzibar Hotel. Illegal Entry When Karume got back from )ar es Salaam he stormed into he hotel and singled out the bur American journalists wilh Field Marshal John Okello said allegations of illegal entry into Zanzibar. The four were also accused of sending distorted cables over- seas. Earlier Thursday, self-styled ?ield Marshal John Okello said is the strong man of Zanzi- bar's revolution and it was he who appointed Karume as presi- dent. The 27-year-old rebel leader, (See ENVOY, Page 7) By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Moisture-heavy snow broke lepth records Thursday in Tex-' as, collapsed some roofs and caused at least four deaths. At the same time, it brought seriously needed Is most usable ranch- es, farms and city lawns. Schools closed over virtually all the snow bell. A massive 14 inches fell be .ween Fort Worth and Weather 'orA, creating a gigantic traffic jam estimated by the highway patrol at 200 cars. Snow slopped another 100 south of Dallas. The snow fell in an area from south of Austin northward into Oklahoma and from the San Angelo-Abilene section eastwan into the southern and border states. The Weather Bureau forecas a light freeze for the upper Rio Grande Valley early Friday anc light frost for the cnlire, area along Ihe river. But farmers were not particularly con astward through northern and entral Louisiana and northern Georgia. Dallas measured 7.4 inches, THE WEATHER and Saturday. A little warmer rriday. Variable winds 5 to 10 m. p. h. Friday becoming southeasterly at 8 to 18 m. p. h. ireaking the depth record. The Veather Bureau began statis- tics in Dallas in 1913. The pre- vious record was 7.1 inches in Clear lo cloudy Friday Saturday. Expected Friday 'emperatures: Low 30, high 57 South Central Texas: Clear to partly cloudy Friday through Saturday. Warmer Friday. Higl Friday 50-60 in north and 5G-66 Anti-Poll Tax Law Nearer WASHINGTON Legislature moved the poll tax amendment to the threshold of adoption Thursday and South Dakota seems likely to write it 1917. Greater Southwest Airport, reporting point for Fort Worth, measured 12.1 inches, the great- est snowfall of record in a 2' hour period there. The Fort Worth weather station was es- irTtn'e'near tablished in 1898. Melting at Fort Worth kept the accumulation to 8 inches, the second largest accumulation in south. low Temperatures Thursday; 35, high 47. Precipitation Thursday: .13 inch Wednesday, .77 total f o r year .00. Tides (Port Lavaca Port O'Connor Lows at a.m. Friday and a m. Sat- urday; highs at p.m. Fri- cerned. The Valley has had 20- day and 4.20 a.m.' Saturday. degree temperatures this sea- Barometric pressure at s e a on- j level: 30.17. Hazardous driving warnings Sunsct Frjd were posted again by the Saturday. Weather Bureau over a large THIS miormation ba.ed on dam area that included Northeast Texas and Southeast Oklahoma us Weattur (8. wtith. Eu.where, a> future. This 24th Amendment would forbid making payment of a poll tax, or any other levy, a condi of record-bettered by the 8.2 (ion for voting in elections for federal office. It must be ap- inchcs in 1317. The snow fell while tempera lures were only moderately be- low freezing and with very little the general suf- fering, The weight of the snow, how- ever, caused considerable dam- age. The 10 Inches at Dcnison caused thousands of dollars in damages to slips and boats at proved by 38 states lo become part of the Constitution. The Maine Senate made that stale the 37th to ratify when it approved Ihe amendment with- out debate or record vote. A resolution of ratification pending in the South Dakota legislature received a favorable recommendation from the House State Affairs Committee the Eisenhower Marina on Lake Thursday. The resolution Texomn. to 30 feet in length, sank, as did some smaller boats. The marina manager, A. A. on is scheduled for floor debate Fri- Eight boats, ranging from 20 day, and is expected to pass. IL1 kv ptloo. The poll tax once was a com- mon voting requirement but at present it is mandatory in only Parker, estimated damage to five stales Alabama, Arkan the slips alone at to sas, Mississippi, and Vir- (See SNOW, Page T) ginia.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication