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Advocate Newspaper Archive: January 10, 1964 - Page 1

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - January 10, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 118th 246 TELEPHONE Goldwater Blasted hv j McNamara Missiles Given Full Backing o WASHINGTON (AP) Sec- rotary of Defense Hohert S. McNamara accused Sen. Barry Goldwater on Thursday of dam- aging the national security with a statement that America's Jong-range missiles are not de- pendable. _ "Completely misleading, po- litically irresponsible, and dam- aging to the national was McNamara's retort to the Arizona senator's statement. Goldwater, campaigning in New Hampshire for the Repub- lican presidential nomination, (old a news conference at Ports- mouth that President Johnson's proposed cuts in defense spend- ing mean a reduction of the manned bomber fleet. Not Reliable Saying this would put too much reliance on the nation's missile forces, Goldwater said intercontinental ballistic mis- siles are not reliable. He said short-range missiles are reliable weapons but "our intercontinental missiles are not dependable." Goldwater, a major general in the Air Force Reserve and a longtime congressional champi- on of the manned bomber's role in defense strategy, did not go in'n specifics, saying that is a security matter. McNamara, a Republican, said in a statement issued at the Pentagon: "There is no infor- mation, classified or otherwise, to support the false implication that our long-range missiles eannot be depended upon to ac- complish their mission. Strong Support "The importance of the long- range missiles to the defense of this country and the evaluation of their effectiveness by our leading military authorities is Indicated by the strong support given by the Joint Chiefs of Staff to the missile program." McNamara's statement was read to reuorters by Asst. Sec- retary of Defense Arthur Syl- vester. Goidwaler declined to com- ment on the defense secretary's statement when he arrived back in Washington. An aide who accompanied the senator on the flight back from New Hamp shire said Goldwater would have no comment until he had a chance to study the McNamara statement. Untried Weapon Goldwater, who has qualified as a jet pilot, subscribes to the contention of Gen. Curtis E. LeMay, Air Force chief of staff, that the intercontinental missile is an untried weapon as far as actual combat goes. Goldwater told newsmen that the implication in Johnson's State of the Union message (o Congress Wednesday was that the President appears to be "engaged in unilateral disarma- ment." The President told Congress, Goldwater said, that "we are deliberately going to cut down on military strength because the Communists might regard it as provocative if w e arc too strong." The senator protested that the administration is closing out the B47 and B52 bombers without providing for any replacements. He contended that the .Soviets (See GOLDWATEH, Pago 9) By HOY GRIMES Advocate Staff Writer Victoria County Commission- ers Court can be expected at its first 1964 meeting Monday :o authorize a definite offer lo She city of Victoria for its half- slock adjacent to the courthouse as the site for a new county of- fice and courts building. The commissioners already lave been given an appraisal Ly the Ron Brown Co., Victo- -ia real estate appraisers and consultants, setting a fair mark- et value on the city's property n the courthouse block at This can be anticipated as he basis for the county's offer .0 the city. County Corns. Pay Moore of Precinct 1 and Frank Barnett of Precinct 4, with the support of County Judge Wayne L. Hart- man, have taken the lead in 'acing up to the necessity for Bill Donnghue recuperating from the virus friends send- ing get well wishes to E. M. Schmidt at Citizen's Memorial Hospital the Dan Colemans motoring to Houston for the day Tony Innocent! starting off the New Year by giving away some new pencils Mr. and Mrs. Joe K. Loos nut in their new automobile Jake Sdilein taking time out on a busy after- noon to sample some dry sau- sage Mrs. A. H. Schlcin much improved and glad to be home again Mrs. M. L. Ricvcs adding brightness to the day in a red, red coat Bill Groll being "Scotch" and saving shoe leather Lee (iillig get- ting errands done on his lunch hour John Cox planning a "do it yourself" repair job Wallace Bcrnhard promising (o wrap up good for the approach nf the new norther he says is due today Lanny Poguc's desire to sleep later than 5 a.m. coming true Price Stevens getting his doily exercise Pac Ray trying his horn out at a pedestrian he knew Mrs, Irene Groce reported doing nice- ly while recuperating from s broken hip at Citizen's Memorial Hospital Mrs. Joe Bum- garrtncr and Mrs. Billic SiUerle both celebrating birthdays today and Mrs. Eula Beams celebrat- ing one yesterday. VICTORIA, TEXAS, FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1964 Established COURTHOUSE SQUARE 14 Cents County Offer Expected For City-Owned Ccnnally's Hat in Ring positive action toward relief of overcrowded and wholly inade- quate facilities in the historic courthouse building. They are in agreement, however, that the present building should be pre- served for its historic values and associations, to be flanked by a new and modern office and courts building on the prop- erty which will be sought from the city. Indications from the other two commissioners, V. H. Web- er of Precinct 2 and W. S. Cara- way of Precinct 3, are that they are in accord with the proposals. In his letter setting forth the estimate of. the present fair market value of the city's prop- erty, Ron Brown, who heads the local real estate appraisal and consulting firm, had this to say: "At your request we have made an appraisal of the city property on which is located the fire station and city jail. The purpose'of this appraisal was to find the market value of the properly. 'Market value is defined as 4Tiamd vaiuc ia ucuueu as UUH imiibuay unu preuictea being the highest price estimat- Texas will be solidly Democrat- ic in ...KI.U jn November national "sction. "What's wrong with right ed In terms of money at which a willing seller will sell and a election, willing buyer will buy, both "What Easy Demo Victory AUSTIN (AP) Gov. John Connally announced for re-elec- ion Thursday and predicted ......nb "njj w u v ii iriiaia WHll nuiiL parties being fully informed as the 46-year-old governor to all the uses and capabilities tn a rimucman'a mmcimn of the property. "The value estimate is as of Oct. 31, 19B3. "The fire station contains ap- proximately square feet and is in good condition. The um, uu jjunucai city jail contains approximately matters for the first time since square feet and is badly before the Nov. 22 assassina- cut up and in poor condition with the> exception of the recent to a newsman's question as to when he would announce. His right arm still in a sling rom a wound he received in 'resident Kennedy's assassina- ion, Connally answered news- men's questions on political The former Navy secretary remodeling that has been done and close friend of President by the city. The land involved is one half city block facing (See COUNTY, Page S) County Post Contested W. S. Caraway, commis- sioner of Precinct 3 for 23 years, became (lie first Vic- toria County officeholder to draw an opponent Thursday when James 0. Halcspaska, Rcfugio highway oil com- pany employe, filed for a place oh (he Democratic bal- ct in the May 2 primary election. Caraway had already filed for re-election, subject to the Democratic primaries. The only other contested race in prospect on the lo- cal ballot up to now is for the office of district attor- ney of Ihe six-county 24th Judicial District, with in- cumbent Wiley Cheatham of C u c r o being opposed by Dave Whitlow, who lives in Ertna and practices law in Victoria. Halcpaska, who said he is emplyed by the Delhi- Taylor Oil Corp., fUed his candidacy with Miss Lor- raine Voigl, secretary of the Victoria County Democratic executive committee. He said he probably would make a formal an- nouncement some time next week. Canal Pictured As Boon to Area By TOM E. P1TE Advocate Staff Writer Texas Congressmen John and Clark W. Thompson, whose The grand canal lo transport districts meet within Patman's water from water rich East own 18th Senatorial District. Texas to the arid and semi-arid ecommena southwest a project regarded tions of the U. S. Study Com as anathema by the Guadalupe- mission, to which Patman re ferred, is the grand canal proj ect: a channel which would Blanco River Authority was pictured by State Sen. William mamiei wouic N. (Bill) Patman Thursday as run near the coast linking Eas of Texas in t h e Texas rivers with other streams, across the state and eventually bringing water in industrial vol ume to the extreme southwes part of the slate. Patman said Ihe channel which would be 600 feet wide at its widest point, would cos some to construct It would run through the pro posed Palmetto Dam reservoir in Jackson County and "jus below Patman said fight for industry. The Ganado senator, recently returned from a visit to Wash- ington where he conferred with President Lyndon B. Johnson as well as members of the Tex- as congressional delegation, spoke to members of the Vic- toria League of Women Voters during a luncheon at Ray Wil- son's Restaurant. Referring to recent federal water conservation studies spon- sored by Johnson while the President was still in the U.S. Senate, Patman told his audi- ence that conservation meas- ures are being accelerated in the Bureau of Reclamation. This work is receiving "won- derful he said, from MOD Workers Session Sets Campaign Strategy Preliminary plans for the 1964 of the Victoria County Chapter March of Dimes were made at of the National Foundation and a planning meeting held Thurs- Howard E. Goldstucker, cam- day afternoon at Victoria Bank paign chairman, alternately pre- and Trust Co sided at the informal session. James E. Larsen, chairman Cuero Man Seeks State House Seat The Pilot Club of Victoria will again conduct the Mothers March, the door to door cam- paign at the end of January i'aigi, ai LUC cim ui January uuinpmnenilTig lOUn] which usually results in the and Thompson particularly fo greatest returns. Three Pilot their support of the projects. Club representatives, Mrs. Aron He added, however, that Kolle, Mrs. Norma Arnold and can't, of course, promise them Mrs. Louise Williams, were (lhe two reservoirs) by tomor present at the session. h The Mothers' March is to be ,wilh regard scope of Cl'CWS .for held Jan. Kolle said grand Pat- 111" ocralic Primary May 2. The district includes DeWitt, onzaics and Lavaca counties. Nowman voluntarily rclirec! as Cuero mayor in April, 1QB2, after serving 12 lerms. Neman, a native of the Strat- ion area, near Cuero, lias head- Cuero To Change Rules On Equalization Board ed Newman's of Cuero Inc., for advocate fire station improved service Just leave "their trash collections the past 22 years. The firm City Council Thurs- for the citizens new housing out and lhe men wil P'ck tflem av inslTiiptpH nifv ___ -u nn as snnn ac onln past is engaged in the lumber, hard- ware, plumbing and real es- lale businesses. While mayor of Cuero, New- man helped the city acquire the (See SEAT, Page 9) Nikita in Bind, CIA Report Says WASHINGTON Cen- tral Intelligence Agency spokes- man said Thursday that Russia is in such deep economic trouble that Premier Nikita Khrushchev must pare other programs lo quircment that (he meet his expansion goals if he l'.oa court cannot get long-term credit ''censed attorney. from the West. The picture of the Soviet eco nomic situation, as put together reporters at what was described as the first general news brief- ing of this kind since the nor- mally secret intelligence unit A OIA spokesman said the order lo make lhe information generally known. dent Johnson approved the Hlon. Topmost among recommenda Johnson said his bid for re-elec- ion has been his own concern n politics. He told questioners le has not talked with Johnson about a Job in the new adminis- ralion. Been There Before 'I've been there Con- nally said of Washington. In answer to other questions, lonnally said: Texas will vote Democratic in national contests in November, probably by a 3-2 margin. Any peacemaking between President Johnson and U.S. Sen. Ralph Yarborough does not in- fluence him. "How ever you interpret their actions, you shouldn't include me. I'm nol taking it upon myself to inter- fere in anybody else's busi a number of other river au is, as a vehicle which bring total federal con trol over Texas' water resourc Questioned about this aspec of the project after his forma address, Patman told reporters that "administration will, o course, be a primary consid eration." 'I feel sure it would be lo cally said. With the grand canal picture the the 1 j til M water problem Patman said proposals for Pal Dam ...___..... Reservoir are now sludied clamation. Both project are be- favni-ahlu 1, eln day night instructed City At lorney Frank Sheppard to pre- .u r. meat: uiiiiga lulled all ticil pare ordinances on two pro- community making progress. nnSPfl nnnnfTAQ In fhn ___i- i_ nation Cobb. posed changes lo the city charter and accepted the resig- of Councilman Lcroy One of the charter changes proposes that the council no longer sit as a, board of equalization, but appoint citi- zens to serve on the board. This is the practice followed by school boards. The other proposed charter change would remove the re- There is much work to be done. Cuero has come a long way but there is a long way to go. "Sewer and water and elec- trical facilities to be improved and extended, streets to be paved, properly evaluations corpora be Cobb resigned after accepting a staff officer assignment with the Texas National Guard in brought up lo date, adequate housing for all citizens, hospital facilities to be and other items will need close and careful Cobb stated. Council passed a resolution accepting Cobb's resignation with regret. Mayor Bill Nami said the vacancy will be filled as soon as possible. City Manager Jim Fulton gave a preliminary report on public low rent housing. Coun- cil ordered the sludy made afler lhe Rev. W. C. Smith pas- tor of Brothers Chapel Melho- was mi experiment in cny presents a sound dist Church, told city council at making public CIA malerial financial picture, has expanded the December meeting that from which the secrecy label all facilities and has many there is a dire need for a low could bo safelv strinnnd. in nlans for additional nrmrrncc ren{ housing here especially iiumtu amiduuii, pill- logcincr iiauuiuii viuutu ir by CIA analysis, was given to Houston. He had been a mem ber of City Council since April, 1961. He was re-elected for a two-year term last April. In an open letter to the coun- was set up after World War U. cil, city employes and the citi- of Cuero, Cobb said, aaiU Uie VI- V-'UUiU, IrUUU OdllJ. briefing was an experiment in "The city presents a sound making public CIA material financial picture, has expand from which lhe secrecy label all facilities and has mai could bo safely stripped, in plans for additional progress, order to make (ho fnformnlinn "Imnrnurrl nlonfnVnl street paving program, im K mi- j-uiion, wno inspected nous- It wn i understood that Prcsi- proved street lighting, parks, ing projects in Victoria, Gon- Jnt Johnson annroved the an- airport paving plans, drainage zales, Luling and Bcevillc, said and flood control projects, new )US. Relations in Canal Zone Riots Warming Trend 6 Reported Predicted Today Killed After By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Hard freeze warnings went up Thursday for the southern half of Texas. The frost was expect- ed to reach into the Lower Rio Grande Valley where forecasts Grande Valley where forecasts ville down to 42 at Amarilo, El were for temperatures down to paso and Lubbock ness- No Interference The Supreme Court probably won't interfere in this year's congressional elections because of the timing of the election process, which begins with the Feb. 3 filing date. He said the next 10 days will determine whether the congressional reap- portionment appeal ruling wil' be handed down in time fo fores a special session. Connally said he has no idea whether he will have an oppo nent in his bid for re-election The nonchalant announcemen contrasted with his resignation as Navy secretary in Decem ber, 1961, to seek his first elec tive office. Developing Strategy lereas campaigning all___ was under way in the sam ----_, uuii4ti -L IIULOUCIJ lAUaildllct illlU phase of his first try for the United States make a deal: office in 1962, Connally said h his strategy over the next two a dawn reading of 7 degrees. was 10 at Amarillo and 15 at El Paso, Top readings Thursday after noon ranged from SB at Kings j Flag Dispute Armored Cars Fire on Crowd 32 degrees. The whole state was cold and generally fair Thursday, Fore- casters said it would be colder ..u.iiu ui, t-uaai. me uiiiy lepuiis u] during the night in all sections moisture to the Weather Bureau except the Panhandle and that were traces at Mineral Wells PANAMA (AP) President Skies were clear throughout Roberto Chiari suspended rela the state by late in the day ex- cept for high, thin clouds along the coast. The only reports ol a freeze was indicated for the whole state. was Frlday air skies. to A few snow flurries fell in the northeast quarter of Texas. Dalhart in the Panhandle had Gulf. and Wink. Small craft warnings flew all along the Texas coast because of winds stirred by the lates' cold front which had crossec the state and veered into the U.S. Seeks Pact On Beef Negotiations are now under way between major beef exporting countries and the United States, accord- ing to word brought back by Leo J. Welder of Victoria who was among a group that met with Secretary of Orville Freeman in Washington on Welder, who is president o widnevlaV weanesclay. Sugar-Beef Swap-Out Is Proposed WASHINGTON (AP) Rep. the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association, sai( the" secretary and all of hi staff realize the seriousness o the import matter and are try ing to find something within reason to do about it. Plans Advisory Board Secretary Freeman expressed Thursday that Australia and the wye Palman or three months. Connally sidestepped J.UJN rlCp, j x- it tin an Whereas campaigning already Bob Poage, D-Tex., proposed nis desire to restrain beef im 'as under wav in the samo ThnrcHnv fhot tt._ ports and added that he wi! appoint a beef advisory com mittee to assist in working ou the negotiations. He expressed his interest in immediate action on the mat A larger U. S. sugar quota for j UP augai. uuuLa lUi has no definite outh'ne for his a voluntary limit on beef ex- second race and will develop ports to the United States Poage is chairman'of a livestock subcommittee which oiucoiciJijeu ques- Thursday heard U. S. beef pro- tions on whether he would sup- ducers say imports from Austra- nort Yarborough in the scna- lia are hurling them. ir's re-election bid. "I certainly _ __ u.w> i Ant ouutuillllllLietl tUaU JieiirQ haven t paid any attention to his a plea from an Australian cat- r nc i" any auenuon to nis a plea irom an Australian cat- GBRAs. business. I really haven't been tleman, Ronald Hay of Tasman- re now hmn0 in i-t- ,._ "auiaa in own, ne saiu. win uesi Australian He said his health has im- cattle farmers "with the very proved to where he has re- best regard for their prosperity negotiations will result in a A. gamed the 10 pounds he lost "It is to the advantage of the system to immediately give during his slay in hospitals after people of America lo have low some aid to the domestic pro- the assassinnlinn atiH 1m nrfpAc Jo Hiifar nt heinf a o ave thJ; and he prob- prices, and that is what you (See CONNALLY, Page 9) City crews are "pretty far behind" in collection of trash since the holidays, but crews will be working overtime the remainder of this week, Sanita- tion Supt. Felix Loya said Thurs- day. "We'll get it all if the crews have lo work Loya said. "Please ask the people to just leave their trash collections Hay said. Pete Marble of the Nevada Cattlemen's Association said in rebuttal that official reports on livestock operations in his area say cattlemen are earning less than an average of one per cent on investment. Citizens Far in Arrears In Payment of Poll Tax lor trie citizens, new housing lllc and new subdivisions all of "P as soon as they these things reflect an active THE WEATHER 57. n ousn ere, especay Improved electrical service, among the city's Negro citizens Fulton, who inspected hous (See CUERO, Page 9) Clear with a moderate freeze Friday morning. Partly cloudy and a little warmer Friday af- ternoon and Saturday. North to Northeast winds at 5 to 15 m.p.h. becoming southerly Friday night and Saturday. Expected Satur- day temperatures: Low 28, high '7. South Central Texas: Clear to partly cloudy and a little warm- er Friday through Saturday. High Friday 55-63. Temperature Thursday: High 54, low 39. Tides (Port Lavaca-Port O'- Connor Lows at a.m. and p.m. Highs at p.m. Friday and a.m. Saturday. 30.47. sVGl" ol) 47 uuuciuau ui Sunset' Friday. Sunrise .ni I hnrp nac hnnn a Saturday. This Information based on data Today's Chuckle When Charlie was a. little boy he ran away with Ilic cir- cus, hut they made him bring K back, The subcommittee also heard ler. Welder said, "We do much time and the only route fo go is to try to get t h e s i countries to agree with us Otherwise in the long run, they as well as us, could be hurt b; the present arrangement." Seek Immediate Aid Welder said it is hoped the negotiations ducer of beef, who is sufferini from price conditions brougri to increased imports. Later on, maybe a Ion{ said. ions with the United States early Friday after a Panamani- an student invasion of the U.S. Canal Zone in which six persons vere reported killed by U.S. Army gunfire. Ahti American demonsfra- ions broke out in all Panaman- an cities as the result of dem- onstrations by U.S. students in he Canal Zone objecting to re- strictions on their display of he American flag. Unofficial reports said up to 15 persons were injured. Complaint Filed There were no reports of U.S. casualties. President Chiari in a broad- cast said his government had lied a complaint with the Or- ganization of American States, charging the United States with aggression. He said a similar charge would be filed with the U.N. Security Council. Chiari said the OAS, of which Panama and the United States are members, has been asked to send a commission immedi- ately, to investigate "the events which have occurred in our ter- ritory." Remain Calm The president appealed to the people of his nation of more than a million to remain calm. He pledged Ihe government would act lo safeguard national honor. In Washington State Depart- ment sources said notification of the suspension of relations had not been received. A State Department spokesman said there would be no comment on the Panamanian action until la- ter EViday. Panamanian crowds made re- peated attempts to storm into the Canal Zone Thursday night. Panamanian National Guard headquarters said U.S. Army armored cars fired on the crowds and repulsed them. Under Control p.m. (EST) U.S. Army headquarters said the sit- uation at lhe boundary in the Panama City area was under complete control. But an hour again along the line. Persons at the scene said bursts of machinegun fire were i uivcatiiiem. It is hoped the export coun- Most cattlemen said they feel tries of beef, of which Austral- (Scc PROPOSAL, Page 9) (See U.S., Page 9) A heavy rush for poll tax re- ceipts and voting exemptions must be anticipated in the 16 wait to learn whether or not the voters would adopt a pro- posed constitutional amend 1.1 mi, iu tutibiHuuunai amend- working days remaining before; ment to abolish the poll tax as the Jan. 31 deadline, since only m. poll taxes and 876 exemp- tions had been issued when Tax Assessor Collector H. Campbell Dodson closed of- fice Thursday. a requirement for voting. The amendment was defeated Nov. 0. Special deputies have opened shop for the payment of about 20 to 25 U.S. soldiers cp.uld be seen firing from be- hind a tank, and another tank was visible farther away. These witnesses reported Iho machinegun fire was being an- swered by revolver shots from the Panama side of the border. The violence erupted after Panamanian students tried to carry a Panama nag into the U.S.-controlled zone earlier in the evening and were routed by U.S. students. Flag Defiled A report spread that the flag had been trampled and defiled and angry crowds of Panamani- ans then repeatedly tried to storm into the zone. The acting governor of the David Parker, called In 1060, the last presidential election year, Victoria County issued poll tax receipts, and exemption certificates to over-age voters, first voters, and others exempted from pay- ment of the tax within the city of Victoria increased this total to Other exemptions in rural areas of the county out- side of the city, where no poll taxes at a large number of locations, as follows: The League of Women Voters have booths at the American Bank of Commerce, Commer- cial National Bank, First Vic- toria National Bank, Victoria Bank and Trust Co., Dick's Food Store at 1302 E. Crest- wood and the Town and Coun- try Model Market at 2910 N. Laurent. certificate is required, wercj Other groups and individuals estimated tn raiso mo nwoT-_aiim-n r _ estimated to raise the over-all! total lo just below The potential voting strength Barometric pressure at sea fT 1964 is estimated in excess of because of thn stoadv because of the steady are taking payments at Lone Tree Shopping Center; DuPont (Robert Campbell and Donald K. Radam Construction There has been a noticeable increase in payment of poll n oasca on aaia m ui JJLJJ WUUUT Bureau taxes and applications for ex emplions within the past few! days, Dodson said, but it is obvious that a heavy rush is coming during the remaining time. The poll tax paying period was delayed for some six weeks this year because of the on U.S. Army Gen. Andrew O'Meara, commander in chief of the Caribbean area, to take over. U.S. Army armored cars then moved in. Earlier reports indicating that the Panamanian government had called on Gen. O'Meara for assistance were denied by the State Department and De- fense Department in Washing- ton and Ihe Panamanian for- eign minister. A U.S. Army spokesman in Washington informed that Parker had asked for troops (o help control the situalion. Co., 1301 N. Main; Rozas Food! At Market, 712 E. Virginia; Bridge; Consulate Stormed Colon, Panama's second 8 miles northwest of Pan- crowd of to have Tortilla, a Panamanian Hag. Gunfire re- Port Lavnca Highway; Jesse pulsed them also Demonslra- Loa Service Station, Port La-; tors then stoned Ihe U.S con- yaca Highway; Texas Finance, [sulate building in Colon "0 In ae ung n oon p P V Insilrancc- There were no immediate re- p P 106 E, Forrest; Artcro Memorial ports of U.S. casualties.   

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