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Advocate Newspaper Archive: January 4, 1964 - Page 1

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Publication: Advocate

Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - January 4, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 118th 240 Pope Flies On Historic Trip Today 1st Papal Yinit To Holy Land VATICAN CITY  mc VI lllu ullti-SLUly ULLUK iome before firemen were able :o extinguish as an instrument for solving territorial disputes. His cense Nobody was at home and the iire got a one-hour start to London and Paris flanked him for part of the order it was noticed by "a neighbor who reported it to the fire de )artment. Picked Asst. Secretary of Labor Esther Peterson for sesso Smoke job of pushing the Fire Chief Casey Jones view of the American firemen Were hindered She will be smoke that had filled the on consumer before, the arrival of fire units The blaze damaged the entire leating system and the door leading to the heating unit located in a hallway. As said in a statemenl that the voice of the consumer will be "loud, clear, uncompromising and effective" in the highest councils of the hide Re; Feb. ilaze reached the attic, burned the ceiling joists ant with Secretary ol W. Willard Wirtz this No other part of the house re ceived fire damage but smoke damage was extensive, Jones 'Peterson on the business and biidget of the Labor Department .Wirlz said afterward that perhaps an increase in the phlet plain safet Property rate of time-and-a-half Also burned in the fire were seven guns, a gas light and a portable camping stove. The damage figure was uroken down to to overtime would help solve Jie unemployment problem by discouraging overtime work. He said elimination of overtime work would open up the ger c two cludi KH 1 bouse and to the of full time Lents. The home was that he called in at E. Bruce, U.S. Fire units reported the Great Britain, and Charles under control at 22 LBJ, Page utes after the alarm was swered. Two other alarms of 1C olso nature were answered businessmen 7. The first was a a.m when smoke poured out of willing to bet that most Internal Revenue agents offer (See FIRE, Page broken FAMILY POSE Sen. Barry Gold- water of Arizona, who threw his hat into Republican presidential nomina- tion ring Friday, poses with wife, (AP Pholo) daughter Margaret and future son- in-law, Richard Arlen Holt of North- ridge, Calif. Selective Auto Tags Available Victoria County automobile desiring selective li- cense plate numbers have until about Jan. 20 to turn in their order to the County Tax Office, reports H. C. Dodson, tax as- essor-collector. To order special plates, a vehicle owner musl have the payment, his last year's license receipt and ve- le. Regular Salei Regular sales of plates begin Feb. 1, Dodson said. When plates are pin-chased this year, the Texas Highway Department is making a pam- phlet available with them ex- plaining new provisions of the safety responsibility law, Dod- on said. Reserve numbers on passen- ger cars can be secured out of two series available here, in- cluding KF 10 through 9999 and KH 10 to 2549. There is also a series KE 3500 through 9999 to be included in "ar sales. Commercial Scries Reserve licenses can be ob- tained from commercial series 2P 10 to 1174. Regular sales will also include commercial series N 7375 to 9999. Farm truck plates are being offered in series 8T 2700 to 3374. They may be reserved. Soviet Peace Bid Leaves U.S. Cool MOSCOW (AP) Soviet Pre- mier Khrushchev launched a Year peace offensive with note published Friday calling or a global treaty renouncing he use of force in settling ter- itorial disputes. The United States reacted loolly and skeptically. The U.S. State Department ;ailed' Khrushchev's package jroposal disappointing. The de- lartment said it would get care Federal-State Showdown Eyed on Auburn Campus (Sec WHEAT, Page 8) Wreck Victim Remains Critical Mrs. loliad Annie Pettus, 49, remained in critical AUBURN, Ala. CAP) -State roopers were ordered Friday to  us of Auburn University when a Negro student registers Sat- urday. The orders came from Col. Al- )ert Lingo, Alabama public of safety director, who told his condition Friday night in De men to turn back any U.S. mar- shal, FBI agent, Justice Depart- rar Hospital where she is ment officer or other federal aeing treated for injuries suf- in a Wednesday night traffic accident that claimed Ihe life of her husband, Robert, and Alfonso DeLeon of Houston. Also remaining in critical con- dition in Ben Tanb Hospital in Houston was Samuel DeLeor Jr., brother of Alfonso DeLeon Also injured was M. G. Par- lid a, 46, of Houston, who was at last report irj satisfactory condition in St. Luke's Hospita" in Houston. Funeral services for Petlus were held Friday afternoon in Goliad, while last rites for De- Leon, a' vegetable stand opera- tor, will be held Saturday morn- ing in Houston. The two-car head-on collision occurred at 10 p.m. Wednesday three miles west of Goliad on Highway 69, ng that Franklin be admitted o campus housing. Lingo told his troopers that at east three federal agents, in eluding Justice Department at- orney John Doar, had been is- sued press cards by the univer- agent accompanying the Negro, Harold A. Franklin. However, in Washington a Justice Department spokesman said that while a handful of fed- erar observers may be in the peratures: Low 44, high 62. 'own of Auburn on Saturday :here is no plan for any of them to enter the university campus "If any federal agent tries to force his way past you, use force if necessary to stop Lingo told 100 troopers at a briefing in the university foot- ball stadium. "I don't want any federal agent on the Lingo said. "They have no business on this campus." Lingo issued his orders to set up a possible new federal-state confrontation within three hours after the university was notified of a federal court order requlr- THE WEATHER Clear to partly cloudy Satur- day and Sunday. Cooler Satur- day night and Sunday. Norther ly winds 10 to 20 mph., dimin ishing Saturday night and Sun day. Saturday's expected tern South Central Texas-South- east Texas: Clear to partly cloudy through Sunday. Cooler Saturday. High Saturday 58-65 Temperatures Friday: High 69, low 47. Rainfall Friday: Trace. Tides (Port Lavaca -.For O'Connor High at a.m. and p.m. Low at p.m. and a.m. Sunday. Barometric pressure at sea level: 30.14. Sunset Saturday Sunrise Sunday Information based on data from the U.S. Weather Bureau ity which'is carefully screening all newsmen and prohibiting any unauthorized persons from entering the sprawling campus. The heavy-set Lingo, Ala- >ama's top law enforcement of- 'icial, emphasized to his men that no one with a university press card would be allowed on the campus unless other creden tials were produced. He explained that the trooper mobilization was taken "to pre serve the peace and see tha none of these students ge hurt." "That Negro is not going ti be shown any partiality. He'; going to be treated like any nth er he said. If Franklin drives his own cai he will be permitted to get it on the campus, Lingo said. But if the student is in a cai driven by someone else, Hng< said, "the car will be stoppct and the Negro can get out and Victoria Oftlcl. El tew walk." The Judge order from U.S. Dist Frank M. Johnson Jr compelling Auburn to give Franklin a dormitory room brought a statement from Dr Ralph Draiighon, university president, that the Negro will be housed on campus without fur (her contest. Judge Names New Counsel [n Slaying Dist. Judge Joe Kelly ap- ra'nted Stephen Guiltard as at- orney for murder suspect ..oiiis Gonzales In a pre-trial learing Friday morning. Appointment of the young at- orney, who only recently start- ed law practice here after serv- ng on the district attorney's staff in Dallas, was made after 3onzales told Kelly he didn't lave an attorney or any money o pay for one. James M. (Pep) Fly with- drew from the case as well as rom Gonzales' bond on Dec. 16. Since then, Gonzales, who is charged with the Aug. 5 slaying of his brother, Ra- mon, at the latter's residence, las been held in county jail unable to make a new bond. The case is set for trial on Jan. 27. In other action in Judge Kel- y's 24th District Court Friday norning, three defendants in elony cases were given proba- ionary sentences while a fourth case was reduced to a county court case. Kerry Lynn Bray of Dallas was given a five-year proba- tionary sentence for car theft and Mozelle Ckodre of Runge and Owen Welch Higgins ol Beeville were placed on two years probation. Mrs. Ckodre was standing trial on a forgery charge and Higgins was charge arty leader Wladlslaw Gomu! The note, covering 21 pages ed to speculation among diplo mats as to just what th iremier sought to accomplish nternational agreements a ready exist in the United Na ions charter against use c "orce to settle disputes. Khrushchev reviewed a cases where disputed territor s held by countries other tha members of the Soviet bloc. H omitted mentioning territorie leld by Communist nations, ii ;luding the Soviet Union, whic jelonged to others before Worl War II. Just to make certain he didn1 ntend to have the lalte cases reviewed, he said coun ries seeking changes wer walking into war. Khrushchev's message, a< dressed to President Johnso and other world leaders, sai lie international agreemen should contain four main pn isions: solemn undertaking by a parties'not to resort to force t alter existing slate frontiers; that th (Sec PEACE, Page 8) Fog Clouds Area Ahead of Front Fog reduced visibility in tli Victoria area to a quarter of a mile early Friday night, ac cording to a spokesman at U.S. Weather Bureau at Foste Field. The fog diminished before Also To File n Senate Campaign Offers .'Choice, Not Echo' PHOENIX, Ariz. (AP) -Re- ublican Sen. Barry Goldwater, romising the Democrats a ampaign "dogfight" and the oters "a choice, not an lunged Friday into the race for le GOP presidenlial nomina- on. The Arizona senator hobbled q a rostrum on the patio of his illtop home and declared: "I to tell you that I' will seek IB Republican presidential omination." But at the same time, he an- ounced he will file for re-elec- on to his third term in the Sen- te. Political Trickery "I find no incompatability in lese two said the en a lor. Four years ago, Gold- vater accused President John- on of political trickery when ae Texan ran for both the Sen- te and the vice presidency in 950. The filing deadline for the Ari- ona Senate race is July 10 hree days before the Republl- an National Convention opens n San Francisco. Announcing his bid for the Vhite House, Goldwater said: 'I have decided to do this be- :ause of the principles in which believe and because I am con- inced that millions of Ameri- cans share my belief in those Manciples." Clear Choice Then he turned his sights to New York Gov. Nelson A. Rock- only other Republi- can who has declared himself a candidate for the nomination. "I have decided to do this also because I have not heard from any announced Republican can- didate a declaration of con- science or of political position that could possibly offer to Ihe American people a clear choice in the next presidential elec- Goldwater said. The Arizona senator, who has a date at a Republican fund- raising dinner in Grand Rapids, Mich., on Monday night, said "you might consider that a be- ginning" of his presidential campaign. Aide Named "Then I am going to New he said. The little New England state holds the na- tion's first presidential primary on March 10 and Rockefeller is campaigning there now. Goldwater plans to stump that state Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Denison Kitchel, a Phoenix lawyer and Goldwater's newly named campaign director, said the senator will kick off his New Hampshire campaign in Con- cord. His only autumn foray into the first primary state look (See GOLDWATER, Page 8) LODGE STAYS OUT Rockefeller Challenge Gets Battle Under Way By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The Republican presidential free-for-all finally emerged in full blown battle Friday as Sen. Barry Goldwater jumped Into the fray and Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller reopened the New Hampshire campaign. Another on the list of GOP po ten tials, Henry Cabot Lodge, sent word from South Viet Nam that "frankly, I am not a can- didate" for president or any other office. Nevertheless, a draft movement was launched by supporters in Lodge's home state, Massachusetts. On the Democratic side, with the No. 1 spot all but sewn up for President Johnson, there was a flurry of guessing about who will be his vice presidential running mate. Several Johnson aides in Texas said the results of an As- sociated Press poll of Demo- cratic county chairman suggest- ed that the man may be Sar- gent Shriver or someone else closely identified with the late President John F. Kennedy. Shriver, Peace Corps director morning, however, as a cool front pushed through the area. The front was a mild one, <..aw uii-wwr with a low of 44 and a high of and brother-in-law of the late 62 forecast for Saturday. Little or no rain was expected wilh the frontal passage. five's brother, Ally. Gen. Rob- ert F. Kennedy, was second with 166 votes. The front runner was Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey of Minnesota wilh 185 votes, with Ambassador Adlai E. Stev- enson third at 75 and Mayor Robert F. Wagner of New York fourth with 47. Goldwater made the long-an- ticipated announcement that he will seek the Republican presi- dential nomination at a news conference at his hill-top home overlooking Phoenix, Airz. "I have decided to do this be- cause of the principle? in which I believe, and because I am con- vinced that millions of Ameri- cans share my beliefs in these he said. "I have decided to do this also because I have not heard from any announced Republican can- didate a declaration of con- science or of political position that could possibly offer to the American people a clear choice m next presidenlial elec- tion." Goldwater said "I will not change my beliefs to win votes. president, ranked fifth in the echo, poll wilh 43 votes. In this respect the former chief exccu- I will offer a choice, not ari The words wera clearly a dig (See ROCKEFELLER, Page I',   

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