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   Advocate (Newspaper) - January 3, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                118th 239 THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE TaUPBONB Goliad Rancher VICTORIA, TEXAS FRIDAY, JANUARY 3, 1964 111 Houstonian Also Victim Of Collision Head-On Crash Injures Three Advocate News Service GOLIAD A two-car head on collision three miles west o here Wednesday night killed two men including a well-known Goliad County rancher, Roberi Taylor Petlus, 54, and left three persons injured, two critically The other man killed was Alfonso DeLeon, 32, of Hous- ton. Both Pettus and DeLeon were dead at the scene. Pettus' wife, Annie, 49, was listed in "improving but stili critical" condition Thursday night at De Tar Hospital in Victoria with head injuries. Mrs. Petlus was transferred from Goliad County Hospital to Victoria Thursday night. Crlilcally Hurt Also critically injured was Samuel DeLeon, 30, of Hous- ton, brother of Alfonso DeLeon. A' brother-in-law, M. G. Far- tlda, 46, of Houston, was ser- iously injured. The two men, suffering from multiple injur- ies, were transferred Thursday morning to a Houston hospital. Mr. and Mrs. Pettus were headed west on U. S. Highway 59 on Iheir way home after leaving their 12-year-old son, Robert Milam, at the residence of Rev. Joe Sheldon, pastor of St. Stephens Episcopal Church, to spend the night with the Sheldon's son of the same age. The occupants of the other car, driven by Alfonso DeLeon, were en route to Houston from Monterrey, .Mexico. By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The weather in Texas Thurs- day remained fair, mild and dry and the lack of moisture brought .fears that 1964 might be as U water-short as 1963. A Pacific cool front approach- ng from the west is expected to ower temperatures in Uic north- ern half of the slate Friday. The forecasts called for increasing cloudiness. The U. S. Weather Bureau said last year many major Tex as reporting stations measured rain, far below their average an- nual precipitation. Hardest hit were North Cen- tral, South Central and East '63 Building Hits 5th Highest Level suffering trom multiple injur- Victoria construction, as reflected in city building ies, were transferred Thursday reached the fifth highest level in the history mnrninp tn a Hnnofrm hncnifni of the city during 1963, with 784 permits issued for worlh of work. This included 123 new residences totaling 507; 225 residential repairs at 201 residential at and 42 commercial projects at miscellaneous per- Highway Patrolman Russell Montgomery of Goliad said De- Leon's car overturned and landed upright in a ditch after travelling more than 100 feet from the point of impact. The Pettus vehicle remained on the highway. All three occupants of the DeLeon vehicle were thrown to the pavement. Traffic was blocked for two hours before invest! gators could clear the highway of the strewn wreckage. Pettus was driving a 1960 model sedan and DeLeon a 1956 model sedan. Montgomery, who was as- sisted at the scene by Patrol- man Stuart Dowell of Victoria, said Thursday afternoon that his investigation was incom- plete. Life-Time Resident The deaths were the second and third from traffic acci- dents in eight days in Goliad County. Henry Conditt Stolts, 46, of Kenedy, died last Friday from injuries suffered in an accident 11 miles west of here on Christmas eve. Only two persons have been killed in the county in 1963. Pellus, a life-long resident of Goliad County, was manager of the Lott-Pettus Ranch which is (See WRECK, Page 8) Judges Set New Trial Schedule Lt. Jimmy ShaKuck in town for a visit from his duties in Washington, D. C., at the Pen- tagon James Fra7ier tak- ing lime out to visit the Post Office John SlocUbaucr Jr. starling the new year off with a smile and Tommy Hyak greeting the first days of 1964 with a case of over exuberance H. C. Boek not talking about the last time he went fish- about we last lime tie went nsn- OUIUKB ing Mrs. Mabel Ann Miller the signals, philosophizing about the present No. trace ?f the cl24 it, you only come this masfer has found' way once" Bertha Griffith amusing friends with a new "cat" joke WJIma Blanton considering the possibilities of walking from downtown home Herbert Wischkaemper icoiunu n., maiim o checking on the wealher and in- the Victoria Chamber of Com quiring if friends had eaten merceTaid plans black eyed peas for New Year's made for several checking up' Arthur and visit with o. er e r a a Her giving his special formulae mains to be done is to for a hundred crop FRONT WEARING Water Shortage Feared For '64 Texas sectors, where rainfall was 10 to 17 inches below norm- c al. Dallas measured only 17.52 inches, 17.03 below the normal 34.55 inches. Corpus Christ! had 14.65 inch- es, down 13.68 from normal, and Austin's 1963' rainfair of 17.29 was 15.29 Inches below theaver- age. Other stations with their 1963 totals included Abilene 17.76 inches, down 5.56; Amarillo 57.30, down 2.37; Brownsville 18.72, down 8.03; El Paso 4.92, down 2.97; Fort Worth 20.19, down 11.14; Galveston 30.25 (See WATER, Page g) World Pact Suggested By Soviets Proposal Gets Careful Study WASHINGTON Soviet Premier1 Khrushchev was re- xirted Thursday ntght to have proposed to President Johnson md _ other world leaders that hey join in a pact pledging not o use force to settle territorial disputes. Secretary of State Dean Rusk jonfirmed that Soviet Ambas- ador Anatoly P. Dobrynin de- ivered a Khrushchev message 536, plus raits. The total figure was exceeded only once in the past five years in 1961 when permits for the Incarnate Mother 'House and (he Central Power and anu me lentrai rower ana new trial schedule has Ljght Co. expansion pushed the set By OJisl. Judges Joe construction total to and Frank Cram in at- other years in which the 1963 empt to clear a heavy amount total was exceeded include the u ot record year of 1956 he 24th and 135th Judicial Dis-1955 and 1957 ricts' The new schedule will start Residential construction ex- jff in high gear Monday when penditures were the third high- Fudge Kelly will empanel a est in the past five years, al- ury for the first of eight cases though the total number of new iue for trial here in the next ranked only fourth during wo weeks. the period. Meanwhile at Port Lavaca, Commercial Third iudge Grain and visiting Judge Commercial building ranKea Joe Wade of 156th District Courtfilird dollar-wise in the past n Beeville will hear 11 cases. i neevme win near n cases. euiu in me The new trial calendar has number of units set up to allocate the ,n 1963 as compared with 43 in Home repairs dollar wise houn Counties and ranked m the 5-year per- Goliad County cases to be 'od' whl e. home remodeling at vorked in during the second hlt lowest veek. DeWitt and Jackson Bulldlnl! fnr "10 bounty cases will be tried the week with the hit the lowest ebb. hard on the heels of friendly ex-mil the hiring of a director Building totals for the past changes of New Year's greet- first, who then could assist in 'ive years, according to figures ings between Johnson and the the selection of an assistant di- of Chief Insnector A. TTacfh. Soviet leader. antl a maid-cnnk. Mrs. week set aside for cases post- loned in all the counties during he previous weeks. Judge Kelly said Thursday that the heaviest backlog of ases are in Victoria and Cal- 57 MB tin houn Counties. S -m Judge Kelly's 24th District is jjVSs IM omposed of Victoria, Jackson, fourth of chief Inspector A. E. Hasch- Soviet leader. were as follows: in a cordial but short New 1963 784 permits for Year's exchange made public 1? L T 1_ ft-l DeWitt, Calhoun, Goliad and Refugio Counties. All of those counties except DeWilt are in Judge Grain's 135th District. rector, and a maid-cook. Mrs. llagins said 12 applications _ ____ r____were being considered for di- Vednesday at Johnson City, rector, three'for assistant di- 1962 981 permits for the President called for rector, and three for maid- actions in 1964 to follow up past cook. permits for talk about peace. J. W. Hunter, building com- A spokesman said the Presi- mittee chairman, gave a de permits for dent is determined to press a tailed ot the coml------. peace offensive in 1964 to ease search for a site, describing Sopes Boosted For Lost Plane HONOLULU (AP) Myste- ious signals fanned hopes Thursday night that nine men board a missing four-engine Month AJleaCl IOr President Robert R. Martin of have present and Jn' 13 an 1S' act, which could be signed by all nations which would sub- scribe to it. The limited nuclear test-ban realy also has been open to igning by all nations. Many Questions U. S. policymakers waited ranslation of the full text to de- ermina complete implications if Khrushchev's proposal. For example they want to enow what bearing this would lave on the Formosa situation. In the past, Red China has steadfastly refused to renounce brce as a possible means of gaining the offshore territory now held by Chinese National- sis. Another question is whether he Western powers would, by agreeing to Khrushchev's pro- losed give up Ihe right to WL defend access to Red-encircled Word Convent Berlin by force, if necessary. and Novitiate AVhat would be the effect of such a pact on Indonesia's mili- ant claims against her new neighbor, Malaysia? Rusk said that if Khrusliohev is suggesting that territorial dis- putes should be settled "by peaceful means rather than by war, it would appear to be con- 10 HIGHWAY FIRE _ A 1956 auto driverffe Ann Sterling of Houston caught fire Thursday afternoon from what was believed a defective muf- fler and burned beside the road some 14 miles from Victoria on the Houston Highway. Fire units from Edna and Victoria went to the scene. Miss Sterl- ing and three other occupants were not injured, according to Patrolman Buddy Means, investigat- ing officer. Higher Pay Vetted For Center Chief Postal Economy Among Projects JOHNSON CITY, Tex. (AP) President Johnson was reported on competent authority Thursday night to have decided on a budget in the neighborhood of billion. He was also reported planning to send Pope Paul VI a personal letter during his pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Johnson also received details Thursday on big new housing program to be milled to Congress and word ._ lhat the payroll and the red ink i are going to be reduced in the Post Office_ Department. Statement helicopter to the Haywood o "I Ranch, in which he has a part- I flflilV nership, and cruised Lake Trav- VFvACty Is in his speedboat. The new budget has been hov- PHOENIX, Ariz. ering around billion for Barry Goldwater, a city council- some what Johnson man just 15 years ago, will tell das called built in increases the nation Friday whether he threatened to push it to around will seek the 1964 Republican billion or billion. presidential nomination. Officials said the President The Arizona senator will aa- now has been able to slash away nounce his political plans at a enough potential spending lo news conference at 12 n o o n( whittle the figure to the neigh- Central Standard Time, on the borhood of billion. lawn of his hilltop home in Par- Stresses Economy adise Valley, an exclusive resi- Whether it could possibly be dential suburb of Phoenix, brought under billion was His Senate, colleagues, most an open question. Johnson un- political observers, and appar- queslionably would prefer not to enily his own Washington staff, be the first man in history to are convinced Goldwater is shove the budget over this mark ready to challenge New York particularly since he is just Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller, the starting an administration, fac- only other announced candidate, ing an election and stressing for the nomination, economy. Happy Birthday The old record is the The senator', ,taff gress ajrear ago. and November Goldwater was Re- By BRUCE PATFON Advocate Staff Writer Salary of a slill-to-be-named sistent with long established director ot the Becky Lack policies advocated by the Day Care Center was ted States. raised to a montll Tnurs. However, the U. S. foreign af- day afternoon at a meeting of airs chief refused, at a news the board of directors at Hop- .onterenee, to go into more de- kins School. ailed observations about the CMICU UU3C1 vauuud auuiu Ule ine ttUUUIl Laum dum LU- dea without further study "be- port of the personnel commit- cause there are territories and tee chairman, Mrs, N. D. Hag- erritories and disputes and dis- ins, who noted that the com- I wouldn't want to mittee felt that a suitable di- marry these things up without rector could not be obtained on eeing what the proposal is." Khrushchev's message came even though this is a U.S. election year. SEVERAL KILLED Tfcl T 1 Lastro olames Johnson numerous inspections made by his committee. At Hunter's request, the jp board agreed to authorize the "LIM-' committee to inspect possible sites for the center with a view toward purchase, not excluding HAVANA Castro dent Johnson is responsible for auumu it IMUBI Uasiro military cargo plane that went charged Thursday that Presi- down 750 miles west of Hawaii d may still be alive. Search plane crews said they icard SOS signals at various imes over the past few hours. lowever, they had not ascer- ained the source or location of that powerful world revolution- ary movement that began with the (1917) Revolution of the w VKIIUVU fj 1UI L.IJG i XXBVUlULlUn 01 LJlB a Christmas Eve explosion that workers of the Soviet Union damaged a Soviet-built torpedo boat and killed several Cuban crewmen In waters off the Isle of Pines. Blasts at the United States laced a 2-hour, 17-minute speech by the bearded prime minister in a celebration of the fifth an- niversary of his revolutionary triumph over dictator Fulgencio Batista. Oaslro declared the sabotage operation off the Isle of Pines was handled by U, S. Central por id hence Presldsnt son Is guilty. (A Cuban anti-Castro called Commando group tack ThemahsaW the raiders, have head re- ac- ure whUe "Our revolution forms part of he said. Castro said, "We alone could not have resisted the blockades, the aggressions, the economic but boasted of Cuba's present military equipment. With those arms, he said, "We can fight against the best and best-equipped forces of the im- perialist army of the United States." Castro declared Cuba's eco- nomic situation is improving ex- traordinarily and reaffirmed lhat the island will more than double its annual sugar produc- tion to produce 10 million tons in 1970. A military parade and Cas- Iro's speech drew thousands to the Plaza de la Reyoluclon In cloudy and relatively cool 60-de- gree weather. Tanks, artillery, self-propelled guns, amphibious armored cars, multiple rocket throwers and view that lasted an hour and ly new was shown. The action came after a re- a salary of a year. The board also agreed to per- rent or lease might prove al most impossible. Several sites, were discussed by Hunter, who run to. a high figure. He said that the area favored to the nontiff bv care center by the committee is bounded by Main, Laurent, North and Red River streets. A site discussed by Hunter, with other directors joining in, is the Lack warehouse and Depot streets. Hunter said Dave Lack, Vic- Esther Peterson and also with a pair of ambassadors in key posts: Charles E. Bohlen, whose ivug me apoties- assignment is Paris, and David for the Republican conserv- K. E. Bruce, on duly in Great Britain. AUU yieuge ui posiai economy tona businessman and owner came from Postmaster General of the property, was a member of the inspecting party. Con- tributions by Lack, his business firms and family, made estab- out impairing mail service, lishment of the center nnseihin Grnnnniti HMn'f lishment of the center possible. No final decision was made, but Hunter quoted Lack as (See CHIEF, Page 8) Today's Chuckle An optimist is a fisherman who brings along his camera. Friday, Johnson will be meet- with Secretary of Labor W. 7.. i-..., _ tossing aside the crutches he has been using. Won't Impair Service cent AP poll of county chair- The pledge of postal economy men- His raargin of support, however, has dipped from a poll John A. Gronouski, who said employment and the department deficit would be reduced with- Gronouski didn't disclose the total figure for the new posta' budget. But he said about might still be adopted. Hunter noted that various local real estate men have in that Ihe chances for UlCfllcU UIUI UIC -v- obtaining suitable property for Morris Enters Race for Senate DALLAS Mor- ris, an advocate of local settle ment of Issues, became a candl date Thursday for the Senate. Morris, former president of the University of Dallas and the Defenders of the American, Lib- erties, seek the Republican nomination. Sen. Ralph Yarborough, a Democrat, is expected to seek re-election. Morris said he has pretty much the same approach to issues as Sen. John Tower, R-Tcx., but said labels have no place in a campaign. ''I resist the label of conserva Issues. People should not be labeled, although this is an un- fortunate tendency in today's po- litical he said. niivn-sia BIIU Among those expected to op- antiaircraft rockets streamed pose Yarborough In the Dcmo- before Castro's rostrum in a re- cratic primary are John Van Cronkhitc of Dallas; Lloyd Bent- w a ase an our an ronc o aas; oy en- five minutes. Nothing speclfinal- sen Jr., of Houston; and Gordon McLendon of Dallas. Dem Chairmen Favor Humphrey Nomination NEW YORK Hu- bert H. Humphrey of Minnesota has topped a nalional poll of Democratic county chairmen as (he parly's best choice for the vice-presidential nomination in the 1964 elections. Atty. Gen. Robert F. Kennedy was a close second in the poll, taken by The Associated Press. Humphrey received 185 votes and Kennedy 166. Mrs. John F. Kennedy and Sen. Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts, youngest broth- er of the late president, also re- ceived some voles for Ihc nom- ination indicating Democratic leaders' belief in the political magic ot the Kennedy name. The Democratic National Com- mittee said there are about county, city and (own chairmen. Associated Press correspond- ents received replies, by tele- phone or mail, from Of i i voiav (.in; "i ui mail, iiuiii live. I feel we must run on Ihe these, 710 named their prefer- say, ences and 719 said "too early to "haven't thought about etc. Others said the choice of a running male should be lefl :o. President Johnson, assuming he the presidential nominee. Associated Press correspond- jnls polled Ihe counly chairmen and other Democratic leaders during the lest three weeks of Adlai dor New York cw lurtt --.lu um n Sargent Shriver, head of the tlonal Convention. Peace Corps and a brolher-in- law of the late Edmund G. Brown, governor of California-37. Sen. Stuart Symington The came those who said they think the kiiwoc TTIJW AdJVl LUCY U11I1K lllG AJM1UIJIKH I attorney general will make Ihe 30.15. strongest running mate Johnson. "I feel in my own mind that (See DEMS, Page read' Goldwater still will be wear- ing a cast on his right foot, an aftermath of surgery to remove a calcium deposit from his heel. Support Dies Goldwater, long the spokes- alive wing, was the front run- ner for the nomination in a re- taken before the assassination o President John F. Kennedy. If Goldwater decides to run, he will have two built-in cam- paign organizations. Both have been pumping for his nomina- tion during the past year. million was chopped from Ihe One is Draft original estimates, or about with headquarters in four times as much as the orig- Washington; the other is the inal figures were slashed in the Goldwater for President organ- 1964 budget. izalion, headquartered in Phoe- In addition, the postmaster nix- (See LBJ, Page 8) Ballot Question Fifteen years ago Goldwater was prodded into his first poli- lical the Phoenix City Council. He won and by 1952 was capturing a U. S. Sen- ate seat from the incumbent Democrat, Majority Leader En- est McFarland. Gold water's second 6 year term ends in 1964. Under Ari- zona' law he could be listed on the ballot for both president and December. Of more than 20 per- Ule ballot for both president and sons mentioned, the (op 10 after Goldwater has said HllmnhrAV nnrT Ifannnrltl. "6 WOlllu not Tim fnr Kvn nttifiar not run for two offices ipnrey ana Kennedy: no run or wo oces llai E. Stevenson, ambassa- w to the United Nations-75 Wing dsa iline for the Ari- Robert F. Wagner, mayor of ballot is Ju'y 1" three Vrtrt- rilif_ Al UilVS befnrfi Ihp uijs before the Republican Na- THE WEATHER _ Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy of Pa.rlly mild turning colder Friday night. Sen. Abraham A. Ribicoff of cloudy and co0'- Southerly winds at 12 to Franklin D. Roosevelt Jr., as- m'P-h' shifting to sistant secretary of commerce Friday night and Sat- Urdav. ExnprlcH urday. Expected Friday tern- 0{ peralures: Low 46, high 72. South Central Texas: Cloudy wuwwi uiouciy bulk of Humphrey's votes Fr'day and Saturday. Cooler from the Middle West, Saturday and north Friday i enrnA TUCn! Hl'dh CQJ7C t.anic Hum uie middle west but he head some support in vir- H'Bn lually all parts of the nation. Tempera! In naming him, the most fre- "'Sf1 70. lc quently cited reason was that a (Pun fort "Northern liberal" will be need- O'Connor Low at ed to balance the Democratic P-m' Friday and a.m. Sal- ticket next November. Much the urdar. High at p.m. Fri- same thinking was expressed by day and a.m. Saturday mftca uihn pa A! pin .1 68-75. Thursday: 15" 70, low 39. Tides (Port Lavaca Port Barometric pressure at sea Sunrise for Sunset Friday Saturday This on data   

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