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San Antonio Light Newspaper Archive: August 20, 1935 - Page 1

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Publication: San Antonio Light

Location: San Antonio, Texas

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   San Antonio Light (Newspaper) - August 20, 1935, San Antonio, Texas                                Why Go to Town? To Discourage Vice. Had He Said I Flew. Borah and By Arthur Brisbane nil otfcer 'riihli mtn-ci. France and England "fear Musso lini may involve three continents 1 the Ethiopian war." Has Europe heard of the New England farme who said ''I'm on my way to towr to get drunk, and Lord, how I drea it." He need not have gone t town. European nations need no dragged into a tri-continenta wu-, if they don't want to b oragged. Prance has her big slices of At j'jca, Britain took their lands from the Boers which just happened t include the gold mines and the dia rnond mines. Italy, with populatio increasing far more rapidly thai that of France or England, lack, colonies. If it was correct fo France and England to take wha they wanted in Africa, why is it crime for Mussolini to take what h thinks Italy needs? Why is it' nee essary for "three continents" to g to war about it? That doesn't take Into consldera tion the right of the Ethiopians, bu France did not worry about th rights of the Algerians, or Englan about the rights of the Boers, Zulu or others. The prince of Monaco has dis charged his army, 76 men Ixcause profits of gambling hav fallen off. They get three months notice wilh pay, and some will tr w be generals in the Ethiopian army. They have beautiful uniforms that ought to help. What a pity, Prance, England Germany, Russia could no say, let us discharge all pur armle and make other countries in Europ oo the same. It would be marvel ous, but it will not be done. A .very old poker player of tli New York Press club, when h raised the pot" remarked casual J.v: 'The only way to discourag vice Is to make it expensive." Tha leca seems to be working fn Ger many. Dr. Schacht, head of th. gieat German bank, leading finan releh, warns German tnat Nazi Individuals indulgini themselves in th. pleasure o treating defenseless Jews brutally are endangering Germany's pros perity. Such -wanton brutality con stitutes a great menace to German wade everywhere, according to Dr Schacht, who Snows. of strolled into a New York police station re have just walked from Kansas City and shall walk back again tonight." He was removed to a psychopathic ward, if he ha substituted the verb -'fir for the would not have disturbed him, for he could have iiown in from Kansas City during the day very easily and flown back again at night. If 25 years age he had said: "I just flew in' Kansas he would have been sent to the dangerous ward. So there is progress. Republicans report greatly in- tion of Senator the announcement that, If nominal he win run. This will be mourniu news for some Republican corpora- ;'nns-' minds, for whethei they have to be "lashed with scorpl' ons or with something else woulr make little difference to someto' Senator Boral: distinctly in the "scorpion" class. -------comes from mant language of the magic corporation circle Republicans will have to pick oul somebody whose language is and itood and who will be able at le to try to wean cotton nnd w.'-.ent tamers, and the recipients of" the works-relief bill's from the flesh pots" of the new deal. AH that you read ordinarily w... But this news will be news one million years hence, if it develops and is confirmed' Dr. Roger Williams of Oregon Sta.e college, has Isolated a minute quantity of pantothenic acid Sev. eral hundred pounds of liver were needed to stipply an amount of the acid weighing hair as much as a .1, Wntcr- ras the trouble and the liver. This Is -.he mysterious substance hat makis things grow, from gm, noinTf A "Ily SpeCk' llke point 01 a pin, caused young alfalfa jiiimis to shoot upward. It is a We fertilizer, will aid de- frcllve human and animal PS well us plants. intends Uuu Wni, 7 That to do "Whim- mppcns to the plane a11 at the same mo- ISO parachute jumpers toped from six airplanes over Tusr.iho' Sovlet celebraUon, and the "Jump" set a nnw world record. Extremely interesting, but what the worlrt needs Is a plane from which it would never' be necessary to jump, except In war, with shoot- ing. Nobody Jumps from ocean or Pullman CTS, and there will be no more reason for jump- ing from an airplare when the Mglit plane Is built Attorney Interferes in Brawl, Kflled CHICAGO Aug. 20.-m-Allor- ncy David K. Cochrane, 2-, ,eeMng I" rescue Jos-pa a Ji'Wti Uo in a tavern lirtwl. WHS .shot and killed todav by cue of Ihe twq. The pair (lei I Largest Paid Carrier Delivered, City and Total Daily Circulation of Any San Antonio Newspaper HOME EDITION FOR CLASSIFIED CALL F-I23I INTERNATIONAL NEWS AND UNIVERSAL SERVICE DISPATCHES APPEAR EXCLUSIVELY THE UGHT IflBHT VOL. 214. Published by The Light Pnblfelilnr Company San Antonio, Texas Member of The AttocUted A Conductive Force in the Community AUGUST 20, 1.935. TWENTY-TWO PAGES. city ana vicinity. j j T 7 I ft Hopson, Bares Profits USE Publisher Reports on Shif in Sentiment on FDR Policies. SAN FRANCISCO, Aug 20 President Roosevelt is po- litically weaker today than at am time-since his election, and if the present political trend continues the new deal will unquestionably go down to defeat next year. Paul Block, thu; summarised his findings on a re. cent sxtended tour of Westerr states in- an address over the na- tion-wide network of the National Broadcasting company, entitled The Political Trend as I Find It last night.. Block spoke from San, Francisco. A year ago, Block said, workers were still hopeful new deal experi- ments might succeed, and farmers seemed satisfied, although business-- men were distrustful, and skeptical of administration policies. Today, the publisher reported, "not only is business stronger than ever against the new deal, but work- ta in both industry and agricul- ture, who were previously either sat- isfir.d or 'on the are definite- ly turning against iU" He said: 'My Investigations of the political trend have convinced me that the people are beginning to recognize the president's broken promises; his assault, on the constitution and Ms intimation he would pack the United States Supreme court NOT AMERICAN. "I am also convinced our citizens have awakened to the fact that the new deal administration is not an American administration, not a Democratic administration, but a group of men who perhaps inno- cently, but at least, ignorantly, arc trying to create one national state, a regimentation not only of Business and agriculture, but of the people themselves." The president, Block said, has either followed or led "in the poli- cies suggested to him by a coterie of "experienced, professors and young awyers, a radical instead of adhering to the Oemocratic plat- form of 1932. Further, the publisher stated, when he lunched with President Soosevclt the day after the Supremo court's NRA decision, "his (the iresidcnt's) statements outlining his, slans were most disturbing and if :nown would shock every staunch American." (The complete lexl of Mr. Block's ddress appears on Page Si. F.D.R7fofd Quit Saturday WASHINGTON. D. C., Aug. Byrns assured Presi- lent Roosevelt tod.iy of adjourn- ment of congress by Saturday in cviewing the made jvster- lay by the house. VACANCIES As Advertised in Today's Light Classified "Rental" Columns APART.MKXTS 2.50 week. Blum" 3.00 week, 320 San Pedro I'.OO month, 747 Rissbv UNFURNISHED Hearing Tense as Utility Workings Drawn From Chief. WASHINGTON. D. C.. Aug. 20 with contempt pro- ceedings if he did not answer ques- tions, Howard C. Hopson to day that he and his family had drawn profits of from the Associated Gas and Electric system from 1929-1933 inclusive. The testimony was elicited in senate lobby investigation persistent interrogation by Senator Schwellenbach (Democrat, Wash- Hopson acknowledged that during half the time covered, the utility system under him was not payinf dividends on its stock. The earn- ings were made by private com- panies owned by him and his fam- ily which sold services to companies in the system. TENSION AT HEARINr, It was.the first time he had ac- knowledged his profits publicly HE had characterized them as inaccur- ate before the house rules commit- Tension pervaded (he hearing. At the outset the committee warned the witness it would "no longer per- mit him" to evade questions or make speeches, and unless he com- plied an additional contempt cita- tion would lie presented in the sen ate. One already impends against him there, as well as against. William A Hill, of his counsel. The latter was close by his side today, as were other advisors. Across the way sat Chesley W. Jurney, senate sergeant-at-arms, who makes contempt arrests. Senator Schwellenbach began ask- ing about the organization of the Associated system and control. The utility operator replied brief- ly and to the point. TWO CONTROL SYSTEM. Hopson agreed that he and J. I Mange maintained control of the system until the company passed dividends on its stock, but they now hold less than 10 per cent of the voting stock, because additional stock is eligible to vote as long as dividends are not being paid. Candidates for positions nomin- ated by him and Mange have been elected just the same, however, it was shown. Schwellenbach pointed out there were virtually no stockholders at :he last meeting. Hopson agreed here were only two, one of whom said he only came because he lived n Ithaca, where the meeting was held. The other, a large stockholder named Martin, seconded the motion ipproving tin management. After the hearing recessed until .mpiTow, Schwellenbach told news- men the evidence so far disclosed profits of from 1926 to 1933 to Hopson and J, I. Mange. He said more would be discovered later. Hopson contended throughout, ipwcvcr. that the great bulk of the wofits were only "paper profits" and that he never actually realized on them. Schwellenbach said many others also failed to cash in on then- profits when they had them. TOMB OF THE VALIANTS v.- I shows the weckage. of the plane in which Will Rogers and Wiley Post were carried to their deaths last Thursday in the shallow waters of a river lagoon The under side of the ship's fore part was splin- tered to remove Post's mangled body. The fatal crash occurred 15 miles from Point Barrow, lnt'1 photo 10.00 month. 75i <5.0Q month. Post TU'RNISHKI) MOUSES" O month. 1201 W. Summit 30.00 month. 1521 liUMSHKD ROOMS 707 Broadway week. SIS N. Alamo MIOMS.WITH HOAKn 727 Main Avenue 6 week. 218 Warwick Tj_montli. .12ft W. Gramwcy AdclllEnnnl information mi Die Above rpiwlles. tORCthw wllh comtiMe stirins nvallnhlo in Hie rtntnl oolumna HI he want nil pngrs START YOUR RENTAL AD NOW "lie many persons are looklnn for ble properly lo move to before Use the with the y ,nrt circulation Pny Anlnnlo nr.wspaprr. mrwit nln. Dial FANNfN 1J.11 Four Feared Lost on Fishing Boat BOSTON. Aug. probabls loss of lour lives in 3 marine disaster was reported today as four surviving members of the crew of the wrecked New York fishing schooner, Juneal, reached Boston a con I'd ,a Norwegian freighter. The survivors expressed fears that three Brooklyn, N. Y., men and nnolhcr from Boston, hart born lost as the Jiinral sank off Nantiicket yesterday. NEW ENGI.ANDER NAMED. WASHINGTON, D. C., Aug 20 Roosevelt today nom- inated Raymond B. Stevens of New Hampshire, lo he a member of the Urtff commission. LOS ANGELES, Aug. the darkened cabin of a huge trans- port plane, -the body of Wiley Post began its last aerial voyage todav. while thousands waited to pay final homage to Will Rogers, who met death with the aviator in a tragic crash. The body of tile famous humorift lay in a Glendale mortuary await- ing public and private funeral serv- i ices Thursday, as the plan' sped toward Oklahoma City where services for Post will be held Aboard the plane, which took Vf at 6 a. m. were Col. Clarence M. Young, airline executive1 Joe cros- son. who brought the oodles froni Alaska; William A. Winston, chief pilot; J. L. Fleming, junior pilot- T. W. Dowling, radio operator, and Engineer Tom Ward. FEW PERSONS PRESENT. Only a few persons were present when the big ship took off from the same flying field from which Post started many aerial ad- ventures including the one which ended in death for him.and Rogers his boon companion. The flight was expected to lake about seven and hours with refueling stops at Albuquerque N. M., and probably Amarillo. The 3500-mile journey from the northern Alaska wilds'where they crashed in Post's ship last Thursday ended .lust at dusk yesterday, when Pilot William Winston set down his big Pan-American airways trans- port at Btirbank airport." The arrival was attended by the first- disorders since the bodies of the celebrated' (lend were brought from Point Barrow. POLICE, CROWDS CLASH. Police and the curious clashed at the aiipon after the officers had sought to halt (he taking of photo- graphs. The incident delayed Iransfcr of (he bodies to the mortuary a half hour. Joe Crosson. the Alaskan pilot who had brought oiil liie bodies of 'Continued on Page 5, Col. 1) GLENDO, Wye., Aug. Bodies of three Indianapolis resi- ;dents, apparently killed instantly thsir private plane crashed against the. side of Laramie peak, 10 miles from here, were found be- side the wreckage of the ship by members of a searching this morning. CHEYENNE. W.vo.. Aug. Wreckage of the plane in which three Indiana persons crashed to death .last Thursday was sighted this morning about half-way up the northeast side of Laramie peak. The information was telephoned this morning to the office of Gov- ernor Leslie A. Miller by Qapt. George Smith of the Wyoming state highway patrol, who flew over the area this morning on orders of the governor. Clouds, Winds A. Hot Partly cloudy skies and mod- erately strong southerly winds will keep San Antonio maximum tem- peratures from shooting above 96 or 97 degrees Tuesday and Wednes- day afternoon but. beyond these re- strictions, no heat relief is offered local citizens. U. S. Weatherman J. H. Jtirhoe reported showers had been forecast for East Texas and for the Pan- hsndle in west Texas. Neither rainfall, however, will extend to San Antonio or affect, local conditions, I he said. I Tuesday morning's low tempera- ture was 74 degrees and Jarnot forecast a like level tor early Wed- nesday. Trapped Engineer Scalded to Death FORT WORTH, Aug. T S, I JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Aug. tropical disturbance of mod- erate intensity, first of the summer to enter North or Central American waters, moved generally northward today approximately HKIO miles HOLMES RULES Court Is Undecided on How Case to Be Heard, But Bans Commissioner. (Picture on Vxgt 2) Efforts of attorneys for the Southwestern Bell Telephone com- pany to force settlement of the seven-year-old rate case brought against it by the city were defeat- ed in Federal District court here Tuesday morning when Judge E. B. Holmes, of Yazoo City, Miss., sus- tained the city's motion that ths settlement stipulation be stricken from the record. Testimony was introduced before the court relating to the compro- mise settlement recently made by Mayor C. K. Quiu and commission- ers and rescinded cfter telephone subscribers protested at city hall. STANDS ON PACT. .fudge Holmes placed W. H. Duls. attorney for the company on the stand. He testified the company had never stated the settlement oi the case was off but merely had stated that "negotiations for a sc't- llement were off." Car] Wright, Johnson, special j uppi u.iju Lit LCI.Y 11AJU IJlllPS l l l Lgiib (JUIIIlSiOll, from the mainland south of east of counsrl for (he city, asked: Miami i A _ji___'_ Fellow workmen stood helplessly by early today while B. B. Taylor, 30. day engineer, was scalded .to death by steam escaping from a broken Pipe at the Pangburn company's ice Miami. Fl A warning issued by thn weather bureau here last night indicated there was little cause for alarm along the Atlantic seaboard as long continued Its The Bahama as the disturbance present direction. islands and miles of open water sep- arated the storm from the coast. However, the warning cautioned all vessels in or near the path of the storm. Forecasters said it was about 400 miles north of Puerto Rico and apparently increasing in intensity. The forward movement of tropical Dynamite Found on Will Rogers' Estate SANTA MONICA, Aug. Sufficient, dynamite to "blow up the hay" wss discovered on property belonging to the Will Rogers es- tate in Santa Monica canyon by a group of small boys, Capt. B. G. Norris, army air representative at the Douglas Aircraft works here, re- ported to police today. Detectives said the cache of ex- plosives may have been stolen from road construction gangs working on the Roosevelt highway. The con- jecture also was expressed the dy- namite may have been stolen from the noted humorist's ranch, where Rogers hart conducted much road building at his own expense cream plant. j storms usually about 2M (o 30Q tilled eorrl- in 24 hours, but their rotary dor behind the boiler room and with all avenues of escape cut off, Taylor apparently had tried to project him- LCoLrbyh hcad with a weather bureau today is- Ivfnfwith T' fOUnd Sued thB Jollowing storm warning: exTt iith n 'ne i "Advisory 10 a- m- dls- exit m the small enclosure. ttirbance apparently central about latitude 25 degrees north and longi- tude 57 degrees 30 minutes west movement is many times that fast. Aug. 20.- mediatdv f.'Tl---TIlO l.llrnnl. U. S. Dahlias Seen As Sugar Supply SAN FRANCISCO. Aug. 20.-W- Pields aflame with' brilliant dahlias may be the source of a sizeable por- tion of America's future commercial sugar supply, the American Chem- ical society, in convention here was informed today. Judge Holmes ruled that he would sustain the city's pica that the set- tlement issue be stricken from the files of the case. He added that two important questions now face the court. A sum of in court costs must be paid by the company, he said, BOMBAY. tefore the case can proceed further. A method of producing for mar- bimkniptcv of a prominent opera- L.'_g! Holmes Tuesday morning moving north-northwestward ap- parently increasing in intensity. Caution advised vessels in path." Bankruptcy Brings Silver Mart Crisis "Arc you attempting now 'to stand on settlement of the case'" E. W. Clausen, of St. Louis, mem- ber of the company's counsel, argued to the court that a settle- ment decree had been signed by Judge Holmes. "He maintained -it should remain in the record of the case inasmuch as the settlement was made after passage of a city ordinance signed by the Mayor Quin testified there is. a city ordinance providing for an elapse of 10 days before an ordi- nance becomes effective. He ad- mitted, however, that another con- flicting ordinance provides for the effectiveness of an ordinance im- mediately upon its signing by the mayor. COURT COSTS UNPAID Commenting that he desired! (9 keep the record clear of all un- necessary and confusing items, .Tllrtpp Wnlmoc w? _--..j I Oklahomans Wanted in Hit-Run Death SEDAN, Kan., Aug. sher- iff Prank Green today planned to bring here from Oklahoma N. p Dobbins and James Skinner, both of Ttiba, wanted in connection with the motor car death of w. M Slan- sifer. 8.1. at Ninlaze. Kan.. Austist 3 caused in the silver rs said they feared a sharp in tlle 3ilvei' An hives- j tieation was orilertrt lo determine KNOWING CONVICT He and King Share Secret '.olvid. other brokers w I'ere iu- feet sugar twice ss sweet as that now commonly used has been developed paralyzing operations to- by Dr. Wray.M. Rieger and Profrs- sor Leroy w. Weatherby and re- search associates at the University i-of Southern California. "j Exchange Suspends Trading in Sugar NEW YORK. Aug. ing in all number one sugar con- tract.'; was suspended until 1 i) m today by the New York Coffee and Sa" Antonio and............ Sugar exchange. cloudy Tuesday night and'wednes'- While the exchange refused lo'rta-v- temperature Tuesday comment on the announcement that nisht- abO111 degrees, highest did not decide the course of pro- cedure to be followed in the hear- ing of additional testimony in the ease requested by the Circuit Coun, of Appeals at New Orleans, which returned the case to Judge Holmes after he granted a. decision to the Weather Forecast CHICAGO, Aug. M. Leavenworth federal penitentiary convict, says the true story of the estate of Sir .Francis Drake is a matter between him and King George of England. Arraigned hefc yesterday on a federal charge of using the malls to defraud (n connection with the estate, HxrtTCll said he and British ruler shared three secrets and unless the tlnj msde them public they would never be told. The charge, to which Hartzell and 43 other defendants pleaded inno- cent, was the same one on which Harlzcll was convicted at Sious City, Iowa, and sent to prison for 10 years. The three secrets, Hartzell de- clared, to the name ol the "heir of Sir Francis the names of Harwell's English law- yers, and hidden He wouldn't go Into deUils oi them. an attempt to -squeeze" of the sort which oc- curred last December. Italian Liner Is Awarded Trophy GENOA, Aug. K. Hales, member of the British par- liament, today presented the blue ribbon trophy of the Atlantic to the Italian liner. Rex. The trophy, a silver statuary irroup slantlins; high, wss received by Commander ftrabotlo. _ 14; high Tuesday, about 97. East. Texas (east one-hundredth Partly cloudy Tuesday night and Wednesday; probably showers in (he north portion and on the east coast Wednesday. Mod- ei-ale southerly winds on the coast .West Texas (west one-hundredth Partly cloudy Tuesday night and Wednesday; probably showers In the Panhandle Tuesday nichl; slightly cooler In the north portion Tuesday night. (AdiHImxi vtntlier mi 2) city. NOT SIMPLE CASE The city has asked that the testi- mony be heard before Judge Holmes or a commissioner appointed by him. Attorneys for the company that he appoint master in vicinity: Partly j chancery to hear the new testimony .j [o be confined lo valuation of the company's properties here within the last few years. Judge Holmes, although announc- ing he had not determined pro- cedure, stated he would not appoint a commissioner. Ciausen said: "This will take long time. There will be 60 of _. w ui testimony. It will not be as simple the plaintiff thinks." Judge Holmes instructed neys to submit briefs on Novembu 1 on exceptions to oriflml ou- ter's report of the ewe. Ht nounced that folloirlnj the duction of these brteti be wooU (ermine his procedure decide whether to hear himself or appoint a muter   

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