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   San Antonio Express (Newspaper) - October 17, 1935, San Antonio, Texas                               SAN ANTO'NIO EXPRESS THURSDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 17, JJ A 'Mf Cnablc to Innrl his plane without risking death bc- cause ot broken landing gear Lieut. William- Hutcher, reserve pilot, '--cles above Mnrch Field, Riverside, Cal., hi-foi'c flyliiK lo dry Ink whore he bulled ont. His flaming piano (bottom) Is shown crn.xliing in flnmes us he purn chutes to safety Miner Leader Loses Fight to Swing Federation to In- dustrial Type (By Associated Press) ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., Oct. .H. Craft unionists in the American Federation of Labor won a sweep- Ins victory tonight in their fight against John L. Lewis and his in- j dustrlal union allies. j After hours heated debate, j the federation's convention voted j to continue the organization policy i adopted at last year's San Fran- j Cisco convention. Thos policy to organize i .workers in production indus- i tries, such as autnmohiles and stocl I along inilustrl.il linos with due j protection t" the Hghis of craft j linions. The industrial union bjoc. head- ed by Lewis, presiOi-nt of the Vnited Mine Workers, proposed j that The mass production industries i te organized, one union for each j Industry, with the craft unions kept out altogether. I The issue was decided on a mo- j tion 10 substitute a minority rc- pori favoring industrial unionism for the resolutions committee's re- port favoring continuation of the present policy. The votp was JO.024 for the I substitute to against. Warnings that workers in the j vast mass production industries j might turn to Communism for or- ganization unless they were brought tinder the banners of the American j Federation of Labor wore handed the federation convention by Lewis and Charles P. Howard. The warnings came a short time Points Out St. Louis Matron As Woman Who Was to Adopt Child ALCOHOL FOUND TO SLOW DRIVER Tests Show Reason for Many Accidents Annual Forum on Current Affairs Hears New DealBlasted, Appeal For Sane Thinking S. Policies after the federation declared Italy an "outlaw nation" and countries to deny her commercial assistance in the Ethi- opian war. The declaration was carried a statement, adopted by the panization, approving the nentr jty policy of President Koosevelt and Congress. In the tense atmosphere that surrounded the start of the federa- tion's biggest family on Die convention floor. Lewis, president of the United Mine Workers, told the delegates that continuation of the federation's present organiza- tion policy "will spell ruination of the labor movement." "There are forces at work in this he said, "that would out the labor movement hf-re just as they did in Germany and Italy." i Howard, president of the Typo- graphical Union, told the conven- tion that the change would origi- nate with the workers themselves. "Let me say to you, the workers this country are Coiner to or- he said. "If they're not proing to .he permitted to organize under the banners of the Ameri- can Federation of Labor, they're poing to organize under some oth- er under no leader- ship." Like Lewis. Howard said that "subversive" forces wore at work among: American workingmcn. iccmreci jiiuy M nd urged ARTKT financial and I AlllOU. fill i J.LJ 1 WINS AWARD PEASANTS RENEW FIGHT ON MAGDA I Takes First Prize at Carol's Friend Returns gie Institute Exhibit j to Rumania (By Associated Press) (Sy Associated Press) riTTSBURGH. Oct. 33- j BUCIIA RKST, Humania, Oct. year old Spanish artist, llipolito The peasant fight to eliminate Hidalgo rle Caviedcs, of Madrid, Magda Lupescu, Kin; Carol's in- won first prix'1 tonight in the Car-jtimate friend, as a power in Ku- ncgie Institute'.' annual intorna-; maninn affairs took a strong anti- tionai a vi exhibition for his irjg. "Eiviro nnd Tiberio.'' I His prize-winning work, for j which he received from the art fund created by Andrew Car-: inegle. shows a young South Ameri- can couple sitting on a sofa, I nil dressed up and apparently no j place to fro. They are posed stiffly] as In an old Daguerreotype. The selection was made by a jury of six artists, three American and three European, from 365 submitted from 21 na- tions. Tu-o American Burchfield. of Gardenville, N. 1'., A broadside of opposition leaf- lets unloosed upon the rtty em- phasized Madame Lupescu. de- scribed as the "chief of staff of the Camarilla is Jewish. 'The pamphlets charged that through her influence a dispro- portionate number of Jews are .setting soft jobs. She is accused of getting her relatives on the pub- lic payroll. Since her brother. .Torgu Mile- tineanu, became head of the .State health and insurance organization, the peasants charge that Jewish doctors and pharmacists have been (By Associated Press) ST. LOUIS, Oct. Anna Ware, an unived mother, com- pleted two days of testimony in vhich she claimed as her own the 'gift of God" baby of Mrs. Nellie Tlpton Muench, her attorney to- night prepared to call a witness who "will put the Ware baby on the doo-stop of the Muench home." Misa Ware testified in behalt of her h.'i.Meas corpus action against Mrs. Muench, sister of a state su- preme court judge, In which she charged Mrs. Muench and'her hus- band. Dr. Ltidwis O. Muench, were holding the "Ware baby in their fashionable home here, intending "tn it off" as their own. Both Mrs. Mtiench and her hus- band refused to answer yesterday when asked if a child ever had been born of their marriage. The announcement of a In the Mucnch home on Aug. IS came shortly after the "Ware baby was horn and taken from its mother. Miss %Vare identified Mrs. Mueneh, acquitted two week? ago on a charge of participating in the 1031 kionaping of Dr. Isaac D. Kelley, wealthy St. Loulsan, as the woman "she understood was to "adopt" her baby. Harry C. Barker, attorney for Miss Ware, said he would call Mrs. Nettie Beckerle, a disbarred law- yer, as witness for Miss Ware. It was she, he said, who would "put the AVare baby on the door- step of the Muench home." Five weeks before the an- nounced birth of her "gift from God" baby, Mrs. Muench showed no signs of approaching mother- hood, a baby specialist testified. Dr. Aaron Levy said he was called to the Muench home July 11 to trent another l.aliy which died later in a hospital here. He testified that at the time of hi.s call, to the best of his recollec- tion, Mrs, Mucnch wa.s clad in pa- jnma.s. He said that he had had a ch.-tnce to observe Mrs. Mufnch and had heard thru she w.is expectant, "From your observations of Mrs. Muench." counsel asked, "did it appear to you sho had just had a baby or that, she was expecting a baby soon "My answer is no to both ques- said Dr. Levy. Press) (By Press) LOUISVILLE Kv.. Oct. 1G.-A1- NEW YORK, Oct. IC.-Llotilda- cohol, fatigue and sluggishness jtion depresison thinking.in the were exposed as the instruments American mind, and a considered of death on tits' highways In tests before the American Safety Con- gress here today. Accurate meas- reappraisal ot the current -political and economic situation were sug- gested today hy Alfred .P. remcnt of intoxication and test- president of General Motors Cor- ing of the drivers were urged as curbs for the mounting traffic death toll. Dr. H. A. Heise of the Columbia Hospital at Milwaukee tested seven volunteer subjects for their reac- tions before and after taking a cocktail. The single drink, the test showed, slowed -up the sub- jects' ability at the simple tests given them. These Included sort- ing a deck oC cards (the subject having to start- over If he made an threading: a needle.1 us- ing a typewriter, and pushing in on a break pedal when: a red light showed. "The heft demonstration." Dr. Hclse explained, "would be In a car on the street, hut riot only would this he difficult for an audience to watch but the obvious dangers would make it out of the WORLD WAR HERO poration, in a critical analysis of National To hlg observation that "wiser policies will be were added a broadside' against New Deal governmental trends hy Og- den L. Mills, former Secretary of the Treasury under IJoover, and a fervent plea by Gov, George H. Earre' of Pennsylvania for govern- ment action to end "wase slavery." Their words of representative voice in the current political and industrial scenes were spoken in the principal a'ddresscs before to- day's session ot the New York Herald Tribune's fifth annual1 for- um on current affairs'. Sloan said the answer io tho question whether America can be halted in its National growth lay In specter of political conflict with economic law." "As a he said, "we know, to get something for noth- ing is an economic absurdity." Mills, citing the AAA as an ex- ample of "bureaucracy gona declared the American people, face "one of those momentous situa- tions which frequently alter a na- tion's course of life." "The Mills said, "is not, us some would have us believe, whether, our Constitution is to be as unchangeable as the laws of the Medea and the Persians nor is it a question of a minor amendment, applicable to a limited field of government. "Contemplated changes strike at the very roots of the existing ci- der. The pattern sought to be im- posed runs counter to the pattern of American life as it has existed for a century and a half." Governor Karle7, Democratic Chief Executive of Pennsylvania, compared the constitutional amendment aga'lnst "chattel slav- ery" to a needed amendment against "wage slavery." Comparing Pennsylvania, coal miners to early American negro slaves, the governor said a Su- preme Court invalidation of the Guffey coal bill would be an "un- speakable misinterpretation of the Constitution." nnd Henry Mattson. ot N. the second and third j ravol'pd- prizes. Burchfield received the; riic "pasant fllf "f.18" iecond plaee recognition with .statement of Juhus award of f600 for his picture, "ThcLManiU' oe of Madame FIVE IN FAMILY DIE WHEN TRAIN HITS CAR (By Associated press) PERU, Ind., Oct. mem- tiers of the same family were killed today when an eastbound Wabash passenger train demolished their large sedan at a crossing a mile of this city. The dead: Guy Baughtington. En, driver; his sisters. Florence. 22, and Elizabeth, 27. anrt their nieces. Marion, 4, and Alice, '2, all of ncar Peru. Bodies of the victims were strewn along the right-of-way for feet. Witnesses found a door'' of the automobile a quarter of mile down the track. Shed in the Swamp." was avvarded Water. and Mattson for "Deep MOONEY ASSAILS SPIRIT WITNESS Defense Says Woman Igno- rant ot Whereabouts PAX (By Associated press) FRAN'CISCO, Oct. that a trial witness against Tnm Mooney claimed psychic in- formation linking him with the Pan Francisco Preparedness Day bombing were presented at the former labor leader's habeas cor- pus hearing here today. that she jfor almost every ill which besets numania." "t nm a. Maniu's statement continued, "but every Rumanian should receive a good example from the palace. The i crown must respect itself." i King Carol's party, in celebra- jtion of his 42nd birthday today iftnd which was the signal for the 'start of !he "anti-Lupescu" cam- paign, took place quietly at the summer palace at Slnaia. It had been oxpected in foreign legations that Carol's rumored en- to a European princess would be announced at the birth- day party. NEWSPAPER LINEAGE SHOWS MONTHLY GAIN; (By Associnttd Press) NETV YOKK. Oct. ers' Ink" reported today that actual newspaper advertising lineage in- jtor J. Peterson, former police j 'chief nf Oakland, as saying that she wa.s two in body jand one in "astral jthe bomb exploded, killing 'JO per- Iftoris and injuring 40 others. Mrs. F'deau was quoted further i Petet son's statement as uec'ar- crcased in September from August j ing she did not recognize Mooney tut that the magazine's index de-'sml Wan-en K. Billings as the men of the she claimed tn have seen before that phc added: iul they were clined to per cent 30-S-32 average in September the bombing hut tha from 7S.B per cent the previous I "I kne-.v in my sou month. In September. J034, the guilty." Sei index was at 71.8. "September newspaper advertis- ing normally registers' a pick-up over August, and. although actual lineage for September of this year exceeds August, the decline in the adjusted index shows that the gain for September is smaller than the normal seasonal it said. Jjiipexcu Home PIN-ALA, Rumania, Oct. Madame Magda Lupescu, accused by her Rumanian foes of holding more power than the premier, re- mained in seclusion here today as her Intimate friend. King Carol, celebrated his 42nd birthday at the summer palace. Madame Lupescu arrived here unexpectedly from Paris after the monarch's family had gathered lor jthe party. j Her sudden return confused the national peasant party who had pet aside the king's birthday for "a n t i-Lupescu" demonstrations which they hoped would keep her permanently in exile from mania. AGUINALDO LOSES ELECTION FIGHT Murphy Refers Charges to Legislature (By Associated Press) MAXIMA, Oct. of Gfnern] Kmilio for an Independent American of Ills OL" widespread fraud and coercion in the commonwealth presidential election Sept. 17 were dashed today by Governor-General Frank Murphy. The executive referred to the legislature and to Yulo, sec- retary of: justice, the proton of Aguinaldo agrain.st the election of his rival, Aguinaldo had asked that pend- ing an inquiry the certification o[ the election results to President Koosevelt be suspended. Murphy pointed out that certification al- Court Flays U. S. Treatment of Narcotic Addict (By Associated press) NEW YORK, Oct. 16. Federal Judge William Bonds' reluctantly sentenced a wnr hero to ,a year and a clay to the federal farm, Lexing- ton, Ky., today and scored Fed- eral institutions which were alleged to have refused the man admission for a narcotic cure. The veteran, Leo Lipsie, 24, pleaded guilty to a charg? of possessing a half ounce ot narcotics. I.lpsie said he had applied to 12 T'efler.il institutions for admission. "It is a peculiar state of affairs when our Federal institutions will take in criminals, but these unfor- tunate relics of the war can be sheltered only if the institutions are not full of criminals." Judge Bondy said. Lipsie wns with the Boston 101st Infantry. He was awarded the Croix rle Ouerre with palm and the D. S. C. The court was ST. LOUIS SYMPHONY TO TOUR SOUTHWEST (By Associated press) ST. LOUIS, Oct. St. I Louis Symphony Orchestra will present concerts In 22 midwestcrn and southern cities as a part of Its schedule for the 1335-36 season. The orchestra's full personnel of 8G 'musi ;ians, it was announced last night, will appear at each of the concerts. Vladimis Golschmann wilt conduct. Dates of the concerts Include: ifarch i6, Houston, Tex.. March, 17, San Antonio. Tex., March 18, Austin, Tex., March 19, Dallas, Tex.. March 20, College of Indus- I trial Arts, DenCon. Tex., March 23, Oklahoma City, Okla., March 24, Tulsa, Okla. tolrt he captured single-handed. prisoners TEXAS UTILITY GIVEN PWA WRIT Central Power and Light Fights Yorktown Grant (By Associated Presi) WASHINGTON, Oct. Central Poiver arid Light Company of Corpus f'hristi. Texas, asked the District oC Columbia Supreme Court today to restrain Secretary Ickes, the public works administra- tor, from paying a PWA loon and grant authorized for a municipal light plant at Yorktown, Texas. Chief Justice A. A. Wheat Imme- diately Issued a temporary restrain- ing order, directing Ickes to show by Oct. 23 why he- should not be enjoined permanently from making the loan and grant. The company asserted its invest- ment at Yorktown amounted to S13S.OOO. The suit Is similar to 10 other pending before the court in SALESMAN SUES FRIEND OVER PRACTICAL JOKE (By Associated Press) CARSON CITY, Nev., Oct. Spencer A. Yoho sued his onco close friend, Charles R. Lewis, to- day for damages, alleging that as a practical joke Lewis wrote Yoho's name under the pic- ture of a State convict who closely resembled the plantlff. A motor car salesman, Yoho said that Lewis, father of the Nevada State prison warden, exhibited the picture while Yoho was confined to his home by illness. Fl IMPOLICIES FLAYED BY CATHOLIC WOMEN QUIT FEDERATION OF CLUBS (By Associated Press) 1 LOS ANGELES, Oct. ing the General Federation of Women's clubs with "being un- American in forcing an issue which is contrary to the dictates of the conscience of hundreds of its mem- bers." the Catholic Woman's Club withdrew from the federation to- day. The issue, said Mrs. ,T. Selby Spurck, president of the Catholic Club, was endorsement by the Gen- eral Federation of certain birth control legislation. The club will retain its member- ship in the California Federation and in the Los Angeles District be- cause these two groups have not yet taken action on the birth con- trol question. The club, prominent in city af- fairs, has a membership of approxi- mately 4 SO. ANTARCTIC PARTY TO (By Associated Press) MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay, Oct. stout little Norwegian whaling ship Wyatt Earp buzzed with activity tonight as Lincoln Ellsworth and Sir Hubert Wilkins completed preparations to sail to- morrow for their Antarctic expedi- tion. Ellsworth hopes to span Ant- arctic by air before Jan. 1 in the low-winged Northrop monoplane "Poplar Star." Soak -Rich Levies to Pay Running Expenses Only 10 Days, He. Says (By Associated Press) OKLAHOMA' CIT 3f, Oct IS. Senator ...T... P. Democrat Ok- lahonrn; assailed some ot the new deal tax policies of tbie Roosevelt administration In an address be- fore the National Tax Association convention here today. Tn a talk bristling, with humor- ous Jibes, some of thgm, apparently aimed at Representative' Josh "Lee or Norman, who may oppose Gore in the next Senatorial race, the Senator declared there was no such thing as "a. good tax." "Some are better than others, some are. worse, but there is no such thing as a good tax per Gore said. "All taxes are, at. best, necessary evils and burdens." He attacked the theory of taxing to bring- about social economic chancres and declared that "No tax should ever bo raised except for public purposes and uses." Some of the tax experts said they be- lieved Gore was referring {o the processing taxes, Taxes must come from 'he in- come ot the average roan, Gore. continued. recent Congressional 'soak the rich' act will raise only a year. enough to pay our running expenses at current rates for Jess than 10 he said. "The rich are to be compelled under that to finance the Fed- ral Government for 10 additional days. But here is the question that haunts me who are to pay the running expenses of the Govern- ment for the remaining 335 days? It will be the producer, the farmer, the laborer, the wage earner and the middle classes." When the Government collects taxes. Gore said, it "merely "oper- ates as a siphon." "The suction end of the siphon is in the taxpayers' pocket, the other end empties into the pocket of those who receive and enjoy the taxes siphoned out ot their neighbors' Gore declared. "John C. Calhoun divided the peo- ple into taxpayers and taxeaters. This explains m ydemand the tax- payer should get a dollar's worth of service for every dollar taken from him." MONEY TO LOAN XO COSfMJSSlOX CHARGED On well located residential and business proper- ties. Loan not to exceed 50% of value of property. Mohthly Payment Loans at W. P. Fitch Co. FIVE ITALIAN FLYERS KILLED IN NIGHT CRASHES (By Associated Frets) HOME, Oct. aviators were killed Oct. 10 when two sea- planes trom the high seas school at Orbetello crashed in night ex- ALAMO NATIONAL BLDG. THONE GARFIELD 6251 ready had been done showing. vhich (h right 8Tants ha IUi- In tiirninr its nttork on ______ Kd ca u 's t CM i ni o n y. the M onn f y dropped temporarily its; OF ACTRESS that. Frank C. j _. _ witness against! UNKNOWN TO CORONER attempt. Oxnian. to show another ALLEGED SLAYER OF THREE WANTS TO DIE Mooney. committed pcdjury. Further information concerning Oxninn will be sought when the attornevs in the hearing question witne.ws at Portland, Ore., and j Mrs. Harriet Walke, 25-year-old Cheyenne, AVyo., next week, George j film actress, was shot to death last night with homicidal In- "a person or persons un- (By Press) LOS ANGELES, Oct. coroner's jury today found that T. Davis of Mooney's counsel Sunday tent by PROBERS NOT SURE IF FILM PRODUCER WILL TAKE STAND (By Associated Press) YORK. Oct, William Fox, former motion pic- ture producer, will appear tomor- row to testify before the Congres- sional committee investigating pat- ent pooling VM a question en- lfed Jn mystery tonight. David G. Bergei', committee counsel, said Fox lintl ignored a re- quest to appear and n. subpoena; that U. Commissioner C'urran in Atlantic City, X. J., had been re- quested to bring Fox here; that ho ''had no idea" whether ar- rPMed; but that he was informed "United States were brinirinjr him Chairman !U Sirovich of York he wants to ntiestlon Fox about an electric patent pool that nllcffcdly the film in- dustry and obtains millions of dol- lars for the use of .sound equipment. QUAKES IN RUSSIA CREATE NEW RIVER (By Press) JlOSCCnv, Oct. new series ot earthquake shocks in the jtrict of Tadzhikstan, near the Af- ghanistan border, destroyed severa' villages and started a river running from the mountains, dis- patches said tonight, Jn all, there have been three series of quakes in the region, be- ginning Oct. S. The total dead was placed at 107 after the first two .series. LEADER IN COTTON CO-OPERATIVE DIES (By Press) .TACKSOX, Tenn.. Oct. Charles Key. elderly president of the Mid-South Cotton Growers As- sociation, died today. He had been -Mentificd with the cotton co-opera- tive movement since 1923. (By AisoclatHi press) SALT CITV, Oct. I Pascal L. Boyer, alias George L, Kutledge, was taken to Bountiful arraigned on a charge of first degree murder in connection Tvith the, slaying ot three persons rear Bountiful last Sunday eve- ning, and then hi.s courage broke. "I want to die." he cried, grasp- ing his head with his manacled ALL RUDERS AND DINGES verdict was riches after A D D I P n nPCl JIrs- Thomas Bryant described how A K H i t iCIMAI 1 V 6._j FINALLY (By Associated Press) HAT Ruders and Ding- The two Ruder brothers (Alfred and Kidelisl first married the two Dinges sisters (Agnes and and yesterday the tw brothers (Francis and Edmund.) completed the matching of in-laws she a woman drop before gunfire and told how an Kan" Oct IB -Well the automobile started from the vlcln- Kam... Oct. IB. vseii.tne shadowy gunman -s and Dmges are marned prQm thjg mAcMne< is (Aitrecl pauscd the IT woman's body in the dimly-lighted TO Jeciai, street, came hig-h-Tjitchcd laughter, o JJinges young girls told the jurors. me." he exclaimed. "U would have teen welcome. Oh. no "ne knows how I've been crucified." His preliminary hearing was set for Oct. 26. He is charged with murdering Mrs. Blanche Nelson and Mr. and Mrs. J. Loren East. ______ This Liquid Kills Skin Itch Quicker Containing six kinds of itch kill- ing Imperial Lotion flows freely into skin folds and pores to reach and kill itching or eczema, rash, tetter, ring-worm anil common itch. Two sizes, 35c and ?1. WPA HEAD TO KEEP REDS ON PAYROLL fBy Associated Press) NEW YORK, Oct. F. Ridder, who has succeeded Gen. Hugh S. Johnson as New York -WPA administrator, said today that he did not intend to discharge WPA workers who happened to be Communists. "It the Communists want to or- ganize themselves outside of their jobs, there can be no he said. "K is ro concern of mine what men do after 5 o'clock." Police advanced a theory that Mrs. AValke was .the victim of been fount! in events of Mrs. Walke's life. At the first SNIFFLE.. Quick! unique aid for preventing colds. Especially de- signed for nose and upper throat, where most colds start. VicKS VATRO NOL 30t double quantity iOc______ "MIDNIGHT LIMITED" leaves St. Lovii Bed rooms, drawing rooms and open-section sleeping cars. Lounge-club-dlning car. Ail Trains are Air-Conditiohed AiV ony cgtnl or oik V. W. Bck.r. D. P. A.. Wcboih, 715 Second Nollonal Bank Bide., Houjloa Fairfax 72S3. "Banner Blue Limited" Lv. St. LauiJ, Union Lr. St.Louis, DelmarStation Ar. Chicago, Engletvood... S.-33 pm Ar. Chicago, Dearborn Sta.. Obwrvotion -drqwing room-parlor can lounge-parlor ears... chair cars splendid meals... radio, Morning Train from St. Louis "Chicago Special" Lv. St. Louis, Union Lv. St. Louis, Dslmar Station am Ar. Chicago, pm Ar. Chicago, Dtarbom Station pm car, chair car. WABASH RAILWAY ercises over the Tuscany Archi- pelago in the Tyrrhenian Sea, it was learned tonight. Fragments of one plane were found on the island of Planosa, near Elba; the other at Talamone, a point en the mainland just north ot Orbetello. HOME LOANS Refinancing, Repairs, Remodeling and New Construction SECURITY Monthly Paymlnt Plan or F. H. A. Plan Titles I and U. Current Interest Service Security Building Loan Assn. 307 E. Pecan St. G-814I IT TAKES A GOOD WHISKIY TO MAKE SO MANY FRIENDS Folks are just like in the old real quality whis- key ac a friendly price is just as welcome as ever! Taste this flavorful richness that is making a barrel of new friends every day. You'll others have you don't have to be ritb to enjoy rich whiskey! THE OLD QUAKER CO.. DISTILLERS Est. 1846 taste, throat t ,nJ purse SCHEMLEYS OLD 0UAKER v___J BRAND STRAIGHT WHISKEY As you prefer in BOURBON OR RYE. It Bear; the SCHENLEY MARK of MERIT yT QM O1D QUAKER APPLEJACK OtD QUAKER. RUM OID QUAKER BRANDY (s OtD QUAKER StOE GIN GUGENHEIM-GOLDSMITH CO. Exeltuire of Schcnley Products for San Antonio and S. W. TCKRS 116 Blue Star St. Fannin 0381   

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