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San Antonio Express Newspaper Archive: November 16, 1865 - Page 1

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   San Antonio Express (Newspaper) - November 16, 1865, San Antonio, Texas                                 :  V  WO  'i-: A f  ya ter thè Sótith.  HON, E. d CÀBELL.  Jfethc'Editor Qf tbe N. Y. Tribune—  Sffi: 'Itiij^^snnfHl ti&th that for thè last 3Ò rffcd.peopte^f the Northern and Sontberh Uiit^ Stateà" of America have eiwli G^er. Stndied and iabase, «¿minatitìn  seemed ioconsktent le of the two 3rnin§nt|. andwhich i^lr^^tion^.which has poe $e<^on, aiijd hnndreds of  ^^Mipi^ w|hicifc^ecti©n osiliohal iyxpeace hi^ bfen resumptiba  - Y - .^.. -Tr—^ peopJe should be  the; ravages of  theivi. effort on the  imm good. WeOixeveiywhere- to. allay, andj^if poB^^j ©feSleial^ feeliug of bitterness ; W fte f^e political education.  the collision of int^i^st pf «aeh section, for ^^ and ^y^H 9ieans to  hftfeiiis diii^jque^ to jamlatt  P^J^'ip^iSi^,;; Jet the^eelinif  i^^TfeKJtlfagis^n pflfease-^es®jriug. prinV liiJ^aajsbgieat rf^the W ^-tbe;^ however  iX^e iflk Qf. pr^pertv f-^^fer-^Lvliiiv^^^ ^ Thousands  «n«« ^f ¿the  ^hft jMWtile, armies of iiyaisiajo. The. hope of  synipathy, cordial co-operation and effective aid x»f euterprisingi capitalists and energetic philan^ tbropjsts of New Yort, New England, the great liorih west, and enJightcned Europe.  The. mass of the Southern people lost everything in t^ jate revolution hot their lands, the larger p^ Of wjiich they are now unable to cul-ti^te forlhe want of Uhov. This large sdrplus they must selL Hundred of thousands of acres of good lands are thus offered for sale at the very lowest prices. Many fine plantations may b3 purchased for a sum much helow the costs of the buildings erected an them; arid highly improved ¿states at less than half the price of wild lands in the same vicinity four yeare ago* There beside^. millions of'^crespf niTimproved  JPslcwdlf fC^ by  i'lQClir^-  ^^or tt borj^tìiemselVes in èifcèfptiin^ Wàyi They ¿ànnot forget iicifeeieilé^i^; still-rtìiàt it is the  the home of . The liberal policy of the Admin-the of State Govern-  ioa^ the jbhtì^^^ of Exccntivè appoint ^ raeiÉÉ^^^d po^er,  lUaite^en.théin JiGpe and encouragement. Ac-«M^tlng the sitìiatìotf as it is; there  is a arenerai be^tof it. There is now Yf despondency even araong men  ' ririi^jS^^P^r''^- with confidence  td.^B fiftuie, they go foi th with a manly heart ti> tho^ischài^è of théir duties to their families, -with detèrdiinatioii, by economy, industry aiid 4ipergy„t^ rel^iU .their.fortunes and to revive the lost prosperity of their States. ' -^Whatever may have begn individual opinion oìF,;two /distinct Goveruraents ;  have been of the  sur  -HI u jLt Pf ^ Southern Confederacy,  afflliiHsiblé to^n now siïe the folly of cherishing All see that slavery , has ceased Î^S^ throughobt the length and  ^^fl. isf the United S^tes, thlerecan be but one G^i^iàënti To say that there rejpains any j-e-  people, in any one State/ WOT Deliëvc • tfcit the- instîtation of slavtjrtr can be tevived, pr whd mbditate tha possibility "of a fh^  SïïJi.^'ÎÊ* merely absurd.—  . TO^^^tionsW settled, and settled forevér. Wtfil^-ÎÎPrth, Soi«;h9:fia^ and West, have one «tàb iestiny, one>duty. And is not the gf .pv^jîgoo^i jMitizen.tp se4:.tp prompte.  ppptipaof thfe >antry, anii to hasten and insure the con-.  fu^^ wJijch awaits this fl^gmnfient BepiAUc, grand beyond the ima<ri-^jcpp^iv^ if the spn» of the Bb-f^yePFMherp «M be ti^ to themselves  The present state of things appeals especially devote their time and talents m^mi^fmmM^ mind and body, to regene-«I^^BPftt^iWl TOmve thesebeautifiil States, f a»^ been desolated by  won  SeJWJCC: m  eseuj  arç  lanfls t^be purchased at priera pro¿^¿rtSátely low. Whô çan doubt that with the revival of ti^e aiKj; th^^çetum of prosperity, and thè influx ^f Dopuj^^tiou which mast soon follow, these' ands wflj, in,a very few year^ nííe at least M I^g!. ^ Aey did i« m the Mi¿-  ^jsippi Valley, liable to ittuîi®Sn, mmm of producing cotton ehoiigli to clothe thé'civi-hzed world, and cprif enoup to féédthe population of America: ,The price of ibany of these lands 18 nominal. They will some day become of inestimable, vahie. The reclamation of this immense domain^ of %yptian fertilitv, must arrest the attentioo of Congress, and ii well wor-t^hy.the : attention and favorable action of the Legislature of the Nation. It- is impossible to estimate the wealth of soil whid» wiH. be re-c^imed by the great national work of leveeing  jtl^e'^sissippi and/its trito - f;'  Î Î Né?vé»iweis¿ therei^TOh^jiiBdireen^entSylo immi-^••amts iáeáifing tófsecttrfrdieap aoâiPQmfl&r^bî^  'miffiilísnd láíeíy éhdi«®pp9rtíiwtios ItPaeapite^  s to make paying, safenínvc^en^.rt4tív<ái-  pf whach I.speafei» unéçualed^N MW p»rte^oi itJarcvasliw-fellfiadapt^ to Sthe cult&recíírfiie «ine as the choient spots in íí?rán^6¿ ,Grdiu of al  sorts grows as luiyw'tantìy aiid^ields as abnn-d^Btlyiasrm any .pàlli,of théîworld. - The, whole cpuntry. 13 .nch.iBr evi'ryi species of juiíiéí&ls as :weli.as agricultniial wca;tli. iìoal,;iròni and in-oicationsof pctioliearoíabound in.evcrv St^e.— this.: paient «n.l hidden^uw^^thi^the J^c cries ont for labor. To rebujlÜ our public WQrfc8ií/and^,bi|ild^:one8v:an<ito the .^jnands pf-the country,.therejis.tàe samé .press-  andííor IftboR ; : î , i iíás^a greafcmisfeike to suppose that tl»ere now any general feeling of opposition to the ac-quisition of poptílatioiK from the Northern States,  or^p^.Except with a .fewtciny>ráctkabie,  short sighíed men¿ tbe return of .|i«ace has re-^sto^d fra^rpjty,.«f,fpçling for all p«icefuh «ood  dSiné,  Oien^. lipeéifaiyLdo W inv^,.  cordially invite, those hayúigliieans to Jbecome proprietors of the spiJ; .who will come, with their families, to live on their, own lands, and .beeomc citizens, interested like ourselves in the pro^er-ity of the country. The amount necessary to purchase lands sufficient to insure independence IS small., At the present price of cotton, oiie bale IS worth $20O. A bale to the acre is hardly an average bn- bottom lands, and a good hand may well cultivate ten acres of cotton, with o«»rn and vegetables enough,for his family and his farm. We believe that all who come, or who invest their money among us, may better their condition, while our cpuntry will derive the greatest benefit from accession of capital and increase-of population, Why capital aud an industrious laboring population from abroad, these Southern States, now a desolation and a waste, will como to blossom as the rose, and be recognized as the garden of the world.  I earnestly invite the attention of Emigration Associations to this, subject. The honest, industrious poor mau'who first comes, the enterprising (Capitalist who first invests his money and facilitates the emigran V will reap the first and sure reward. The.philanthropist who would better the; condition of his felJow-man can find no better fiold than this. And what nobler object can engage the attention of enlighted statesmen than the work pf peopling aud . developing the resources of this magnificently beautiful country. Jt is a subject worthy the attention of all .goou people, who desire the welfare of their country. To all such, I respectfully commend the careful consideration ofIhese crude suggestions; and if I shall succeed in attracting the attention of those able rand willing to further this great wwk, tl shall feel that I have indeed i'done the State^ some service." i t am, very, respectfully,, your obedient servant, ^ E. C. CABELL. Memphis, Tenn., Aug. 11, 1865.  compromise,^ they would l^^ev you one to five, and you six months, or even threoJi question now j scittle "it crush out the rebeHi'o'n I want to see peace, and shortest way to get it/*  Re Approves iUe EcpuUicxm recurring to the prificiples ^Qpntaoed i^h'e resolutions so uhanihiously adopt^iby thp^nven-tion, I find, that subslintiilya'is^rd %ith my public' acts and ' dpinit^s %r^t^ore' inade known aud'^xpi^ss^di arij .'^ei^re most cordis ally approved and endorsed^ lndpthe npmination having'been conferred with9iifc|iny 'soUoitation  jm  îy could whip live in%eace s. Settlltlie ttle it finálly ; thé traitors, e that is the  píeásúre  ac-  hiaâe Odiov^, ^ Jphn^ón, tJlep ^ inakola speech, ^ tiie éà^tùt^f  on my part, is with the  cepted/' r ;  Treasoifi mjiat he Punis> C^n the 3d .of.^prij, yiice Present, ^^allécÎ pn occasion 'of réioiein|^  i '^ We'àre riów^, my feieuiJs^jftndiBtf up a re bèllion—a greàt "effort' tìiàfc l#b9(?r made M bad ìnen ;fei;^vprthrow the G^ernment of fhë United Statés~a Government^unâea^ upon free principles, and pcmentod By*; thé besÎ^bÎood .of the revolution. ^ ' „ N ; ; ^ ,;  * " i ana tn'favoi t)f leflienèir; brifc  in my opinion, evilnloers shonJ^be punished.—^ Treason is the highest, crimè'ilo^ià itbé catalogue of crimes, and for him Ifef Is gmity of it  fot- hiip that is? wiÎFÎnf fô'life «g^i^slthei^lmrity of the naPfi:^ woùKi sîiy mVd^améH ea^^^'ftfftîàliiièiit; option  iM, ciT .apdpEP^enshed, their«Mîîâl  e penalty = iHj^ifrlô»^^^^^  ;fle.eils réDûWand ^^upishraeim hère as welt- ffe èls'òwhere: 'It is%ót thè'ìif# fiëld whb  «i-Q |he greatest'fe-kitors. Itil^V^men Whc have ^bèôursiffèd them to imperil  fttd to secure to them a republican form of gov ernment. This is no new opionion. This is no new opinion. It h expressed in conformitv with my understanding of the" genius and theory of our government. Then, in adjusting and putting the government upon its legs again, I think thi progress of this work mnst pass into the hands of its friends. If a State is to be tiursed nntil it gets strength, it must be nursed by its friends not smothered by its etíemies." '  «V • , ....  " CiTiTop Mexico, Oct. 1, fo ihe Eilitbir of the iV; 0. Tintes \ Having beenyuoable to prepare my cor-respondeüríce ill tii^ae for : the mail which  1865.  started yest^rday, I will have to send itby tlié exti£i(»dmaiy, ' '  one  their lives¿ while  •'.""f""' * oaj- wm .  The hallertofntellipnt; infldiéñtlahtráitork'---But to the honéèt boy, to thë ^ad'ed merj,ïwhô baye been deceivfedìnfó 'the reèel-^nks/Iw eiçtend iebîëricy ; I woiild sî^ ' Return toy oui-  thus giving you  _ s later tìews.  ^^ 18th; many ¿veins principal  > lllHifilifelit UiMllhihaih na  bf Presidettt JaareKv His captuiie had/been anticipated and planned as the finishin® sitofee t(» tiias year's campaign, and the disappointment has been severa. It is now conceded that Juarez is. not only beyond the reach of the Imperial forces, but that his pfeseiXt position is decidedly a nipre ifa-yoratlc one than at Chihuahua.  Ihe Eéiafétfésays: «^Duririg all thè Urne the Liberala wnfder Eigueroa occupied Tehnacanu àU iCltò i stores ;d^e>iiained open,  s(?H oi|t<in a few 1i©ufs A? 1 m ^Igck.., Jpi4;l^le,4.i^rals "irt hat.  New York, Oc:. 28.—The WmM states that Mr. Dsv» wil te ■lililí simply OD the charge of Ireasm, IWHilllL Speed, Rons^n, Ctiffc f J aod Bffecf rnmitm eouosels for ibe defeoee.  Washikotok. Oet. 28.—A radical joitmsi sajs that the «he Clerk of the House will mH mtrnr Ém  Southern R^pmen&ittm » aiNliiniir.  Minister Adams »tohialtoiijiiiiiiim*ig Earl Kussel ibal this Govemmeiit wM. """ accept a coüHitíssíOB to seifle ibt Earl Rnssol, howerer, will claims for arliiirafkifi of the Crowu hate alit^i^ yaííJ. ■ T'itÄfö  ^ Nfcw York, T Tilif ItMU" -  Washiii^OR  net meeting of |irotfiieted reported, says the sp^^ .„„ pondence betweenf Mincer EarlRnssel was .generally dBCiäii^' out reference Iq action.  Wash INOTON, Oct. SO^The ff^ % Times special, sav«% tfiat Gen. _ mission to the Sea island» was to ^te, not setfié matim fhete W^mm^' the negroe^ftii the^, mmdt^ báwm  Uted from $500 to $15,000. A haent of this cliiSeflrri]r**wilt bp'  11  M  r 906 arined men and  Ì Ti JT  .'J'.  Mow. *>aif  ítrflelthéÉít miite_______  üie privateers,  p^deiir Jëmiisôifôii^g^ #  «nd the  .....ttto)that^Wcàlthy tra  tors shoutd 'be' tóá^e to remunerate those men \Vho have safferevi as « of itheir  ^rirae—^nion tíién who who have been diiven fì'om th^ homes, bé^ars an(| watìdere^:^'amon^ It is well to  in things beinÉIìóidt^^n^^^^^  in mdulding j^blíc opinion,.»^ in giving it a ])roper direction. Lièi us Wmmeneo>fÍierí:Work. We have put. down-Áese traitors in arms; let qs put'thetàoadiòilji inlaw^n ipnblic'íníígment, and in théí morals of the world.".  On the l8ih of April, three days after he had )ecome í^resideiit by the death of Mr. Lincoln, lesaid'to an EHnoisdelegation:  "Here, gentlemen, you perhaps expect me to iresent some indication of my future policy.—-One thing I will say- Every era teaches its lesson. The times we live in are not without instruction. The American people must^be taught  —if they do not already feelT—that treason is a crime and must be punished ; that the Govern» ment will not always bear with its enemies; that it is strong, not only to protect, but to punish.— Let it be engraven on every heart that treason is a crime, and traitors shall suffer its penalty.  When the question of exercising-mercy comes before me it will be considered calmly, judicially—remembering that I am the Executive of the nation, I know men love to have their names spoken of in conuection with acts of mercy ; and how easy it is to. yield to this impulse. But we nxjist not forget that what ma-c be mercy »,o the individual is cruelty to the State. In ;the exercise of mercy there should be no doubt left that this high prerogative is not  ) - -  The following extracts from speeches and addresses of Pr^iident Andrew Johnson we dopy from an exchange :'  Traitors should he PunisM^ln hisreply to Senator Lan^ March 2, l86l, Mr-Johnson said : " Show nae the man who has been engaged in these conspiracies; show me who has been s1t-  Theezperk  r system will, A i BUi^I, and, J kpow iy^ ii ' ájtuil kna^fair itó^'EffiÌrè. In my mtove «océeütfífbthaa is lyi»elUfv«^f Aút-^ deliioralizatmn^,to  " " Ä^fe^ars  nv black, laborers to'  r á'^iáné^ òhi iií^eqaat^^^cf tfee'  ôF^fllè'couàïkjr.'^^^iiiiéu^ not oíáy4líe  I of medStíiitb^  rtíctíons tö'tkke '^oür fortá, ^wwi' cästombÖuSes, if tóéòàls kild dí^^ wi» show y^tflä '^^«^Thât.b^^ôné^WÎre^tbë  l^idént bf irèi^â do «  íí^^iwí*^®^®^® P 1806 with AarókíBiWr, ^^ èharjgéd^%Hh treasoìi^y ï '^ttld/hüve  -7——— ffl&ii:tre3^yand,'>ifj t^i^t  ricted,fJhy thfejBtetoal Qod th^y should:,snffer.the penalty of the law at the hands,;eC^jBi lexecution; er. Sir, treason must.^-punished. Its enor-liritylsnd'trl^e extentiand jdep^ of |i{e <igr^nce  dof ilèe Repub-t wh^ i^uiation iato f the Boathern country; . „ «iipiiiM^vwkUsh./tfaerV people of tliC-South havç not," and the active  itsik^^^^ every de  partment, wben soEÜcthiögW 'th^ ßin'd must' be  done.  . : Men must Leaden the leaders of rd>(ellion have decided upqin etei^i separation between you ^anji them. TiiosjB lead ; ers most be conquered, and a new set of men brought forward who are to vitalize and deyefop the Union feeling in the South. You must show^ your courage here as Senators, and impart it to" those who are in the field. If you wefS" tow to  used to relieve.a few at the eocpense of mr,ny.-p Be assured that'I shall nev^r forget that I «m not to consult my own feelings alone, but to give an account to the whole people. Amnesty to the many, justice to the leaders.".  To an Indiana dcleggtioh he said : i " We havc^ secu that the Government is composed of parfe^ each esscn ta al to the whole, and 'the whqje essential to eadh parti Now, if an ic-» dividual (patÇ of a'Statè^ declare wàiragainst the whoïéj .' in vìòlatioiv'^óf thé constitution,: hé, as a citïzéWj has. viiilatéa the^ law,» atd is «responsible for the act as ^n'individuai. There may bé mòre  than onö'indit^iduäl; it'ihay go ôn utìtiì they be come parts'of States. Sometimes, the rebellion may go on increasing in nudïber untii the Slate machinery is' ó^eHurned, and the country be-comés like a mah'that i» paralyzed !<ô» one "side. But we fihd in thé'Constitution a great paifabea )rövided^ «ít provides that the United Statssj that is thè' groât'îni^ger) shall gbarantce to each St^ie (the iYitV^eia òomposingthe' whole) in this  W rfe^tfblife^tt Um- Hp go^emnaenti r Yes, if rebellion has been ranspa^ v^siSde the  machinery of aState^r'a time,<ihere,standalhe great law to removeifih^ "^alysb aad^ revitidize  if Pddm mi^t^  't  occasion.' Sôraé"aTe's'atÉâSôd''<rit&Hhe idea that tó he^^sf in t^rifóriàl arid étüer divi-are^ fó' loye'Hhefr cháráctér' as States.^ •  siÖns;  an^^njbynïéiiit"^ à" repubHcaïi form ot- govern-: p ent. ; ' A Ôt^iié miy be; iri the government with a pecnîiàr' itìsÌÉfÈutiò'n; and " by thé ' operatbn of rélìellìbh'iòsé thatïéiitiirê;; blît* it was a State when it wqnt into reb^llipri, iliiiciwhen it comes^ out without thè institution, it is still a State. 1) lold it a solemn obligation in any one of these States, whère the rebel "àrmìés^hàve been beaten back or expelled, I care not how smidl the ship of Stàtci 'I hold it,T«ay, a high duty to protect  rNcólàlpaìn dft the' gtîM occiîpieanby ithfe liribèfrals under Oen. ^Gâréia^ thus Jiaving und|^lsp»t&d?posses6if)tt-i)6ihp whole ^iai^;, ,-Th©idefeat^i the French at tlie townof Pqijai Jas c.insed.gre-it spnsation^ as it IS the first time they have fceen attacked  and defeated behind etìfreiichm  Thë Frèifch pàj)ér says : »'The deplòrà b e events of San Pèìipé àtei confirmed in all their détails. If wàs Ugalde that attacked and roii ted the.forces of Moncada and Concha. After t his coitp de main, this gu rnlla chief occupied llotepec.. Tlie Imperial loss was 260 infantry aiid 120 cavalry."  This city is rio w beleaguered. From the tOWters pf the Cathedral the camp fires of  thè Liberals are plainly visibl'f aria few , r' , /  parties or Liberals, who intercept corrosa pondence and impede travel. Trauis witli mgrchandise are frequently detained until they pay the same duties to the Liberals^as have been collected on ihem at the Impe-nal Custom Houses, and this in defiance of the Id fge bodies of Iràperial troops patrol-ing the rbads.  The great event of the week, confirmed last nighty has been the escape of Gen. Porfirio Diaz, who was taken prisoner at the capture of Oajaca. He had been closely guarded for many months, and his es, cape has caused some excitement, as he is considered a man of great activity and bravery. He distinguished himself at the siege of Puebla, and is considered by the French the best officer of the Liberal a'rmy. He is very popular m the southern part of Mexico, and it is anticipated he will prove very troublesome. , •  A French General last night said to me, "we are teaching the Mexicans how to fight." And Count Pottier, in his report of a battle, says: "this time the Mexican cavalry did not fear to charge ours-"  The situation, instead of improving, grows daily worse and worse, and even the French despair of pacifying the country. It is true success follows the French arms, but it is not permanent. EVery place they take they are obliged to garrison, or the moment they leave it is occupied by the Liberals. The system of forcible itupress-.ments resorted to by the Imperialists tends to demoralize their troops, who deserta the first opportunity, The financial difficulties are daily oil thè increase, ,and, as the Imperial journals acknowledge, no moxe recourse can be had to foreign loans.» and the state of the country forbids the collecting of any revenue.  . Every day the Imperial cause grows more' unpopular, and every day the breach widens between the native ajid foreign element, and gro ws more an tagonist tea I. E ven the tiapst sanguine jpartlsans of the empire coh-fes^ th^àt the tótÌtioiis prestige which fol-}ç}weà Maximiiiiaii^^dvent to Mexiòò' has diisai^^ftred: aiid tii^^^^^ catiso of iriter-verition açd;^Mrch^^ hà^ ëote^â Ìiitó à crisis whicÎMi^aaâkberoïc remg^d^^^  iemioir ifiiFn^noeaiiil the intefpr#fafion Jbat  vice to (o try in  delves, abiplqtely inrnjies of the Monroe doctmf».  The iblfowi% isliiie df ibe , cations dated Oct. 2ft tiiini^dl J.JohtijiOn, Pit>vi9iotiaI CftliNMkier giai.  To Jpscpii Johown. Pre%liiiiii»t  01 GeorgiayMfiledgenlte:  Tour several t^egrams luiv^ ceived. The- Presideiif rf t^' States caniipt r^c^nize tfce State as .having retnmecf io .. pf loyalty .to 4be Union lluit  New York. Oct. arrested yesterday, and ^ 'housand dollars in coifnterfeit notes and fractional cnrrencf, on his premises.  President Johnson.has issued bk rnation appoindng the first TIliii^V Hi  December as a day of genrral ll " '  and prayer.  • CtiNNiNG.^Woi heard .9I! a..if^o laay wiio has been marriageable ani^ in tlie market, years past, wcio, a fe\v  qighiajsince; iioothi? presence of iier,inpther, in response to the inquisitive question how old she was, promptly, apd^poetically , re-pMed that but eighteen springs had passed over her head. Upon going home, her mother rebuked her for telling a falsbiiood; bift the^en^^ lady answered by divesting lerself of her hoop-skirt, and requesting ler pareijt to coiiiit ihe springs therein, wheiishe "acicnowledged the corn." Cunning girl. She should have a man to buy loop and other skirts, for her.—Oaira Times.  T^Las atld iMnr CMttt.  C. b. Jenuy, of Galveston, his  circular on this subject, in wbieb hemfti  Tuking further into consideratioil the eaily rains, the consequent and in several districts,vhe army have successively and snccessfnlly their work of destruction, the nnoAer of bales of the new crop c|innot be to exceed 75,000 bale», to he eSpOtfed Galveston, making a lotafl stock and together, of about 130,000 Io 150.000  1 do not venture topffedkf tiinf ffaefmii;^ b m of free !men's labor irill beM>lved,b« am convinced that Texas will, in fofoi^ take the lead as the Cotton Stale, in if through freedmen's work, or white hiler, or both eombinedrf For 'white labor, Urn caiiiiify offers extensive, healthf, ductive lands. Alreadf before the  piobabl v over 30,000 bales were gmwar b^ white labor, and as a general <  ter than average crop qnali^^ highly remunet^le prkesof now excite to donbte^ '''' *  With a large and from the States, we may, ther^ore, I see but bright prosperity of Te* cerely regret that they mlut be through the temporary min of ma^f ii viduals.  In regard Io tbe total cioj^aatf the South, t^e ^iknral taihed by & few,) sonie tnia to 2.00^000 Mlfesr^ tipii, ■"" cpuld 0e fea^ siistaiifeS ii^heft^ pects of the former *' witbstoe^ ^  .rffee fiigh m ments of our stoc^i they shbiiia giye quahtii^, by M^ieiMii A momentary redetiolKflin^ ~ ' Liverpool; eaused byiieMKvy India and* iftmerica all, I think puce»for American fatif gradually Miflfeti, in ptoportlwi lirlilaaiipl acts Will be appreeifited, and nioin i»|ii Europe, as iii all ^babrtity Ae gress will impose a heavy export he staple.  jSî^ Woman can rally requires a _  ..goodmanxoftt^plydail^   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

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