Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

San Antonio Express and News Newspaper Archive: March 14, 1954 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: San Antonio Express and News

Location: San Antonio, Texas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   San Antonio Express and News (Newspaper) - March 14, 1954, San Antonio, Texas                                I Fair and Cold Details in Column 5 TWO Great Separate Daily Newspapers Combined Into Sunday Newspaper Final Edition Copyright 1954, by Express Publishing Co. NO. YEAR SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS, SUNDAY, MARCH 14, 1954 150 PAGES IN 12 SECTIONS 15 CENTS SECTION A NIXON HITS RED QUIZ METHODS Real'Wrangle' Seen on Texas Tax Increases By JON FORD Associate Editor See Pictures Page 8 A AUSTIN, .March 13. Texas lawmakers from the big cities and the forks of the creek were converging on this state capital city at week's end to face the un- happy task of writing million worth of new tax to the "trial site" BY JUDGE LAUGHLIN Two Rangers' Trial Moved From Alice By CLARENCE J. LaROCHE Staff Writer ALICE, March assault with intent to murder trial of two Texas Rangers Saturday was sent to Brownsville, Cameron County, after Dist. Atty. Raeburn Norris and attorneys for the rangers agreed to the venue change. Judge C. Woodrow Laughlin of 79th district court entered the or- der after Norris and Jake Floyd, representing Capt. Aired Y. Allee and Joe Bridge, agreed in court bills. A special session of the legis- by Gov. Allen Shivers to finance teacher and state emp.loye pay raises, to outlaw the Communist party in Texas, and to appropriate funds for building at state in- etitutions is due to 'be gav. eled >to order at noon Monday. NOBODY, INCLUDING Gov. Shivers, is expecting the legis- lators to vote new taxes during an election year without some Texas-style wrangling. Commented the governor Friday, in announcing his re- commendations for increased business franchise levies, a hike on the beer tax per bar- rel, and a "replacement" gas In an unprecedented move last Monday, Norris had requested the change of venue. Queried about his action, district attorney said he had acted solely in the interest of obtaining as fair a trial as possible. "I felt, in view of the large amount of said Nor- ris, "that a fair .and impartial trial would be unobtainable here." The two veteran rangers were indicted in February in conneC' tion with a fight they had in the court house here on Jan. 18 with George B. Parr, Duval County political -boss, and Sheriff Archer Parr, also of buval. At the time of the fight, Parr lad come to Alice in connection with his alleged brandishing, of a gun during a Freedom party meeting. into some county other than the After a five-minute .recess to allow Floyd to talli with Capt. Al- lee and Bridge, Floyd_ told the court he would select Bexar Coun- ty. Xorris then countered with Cameron. "Counsel told me ear-' said Norris, "that they would agree to Cameron. "We will agree to Cameron said Floyd, the tall, taciturn lawyer whose son was gunned down and killed" Sept. 8, 1952, in a "mistake murder" meant for him. Judge Laughlin nodded. Looked at the court reporter and said: "Let the record show that the court prefers to.transfer this case north of San Antonio; but in view of the agreement, the court will honor that agreement and Stinging Dust Blankets Most Of South Texas Eye-stinging -dust swirled into San Antdnio and South Texas Saturday morning and nipping on the heels of the harrassing, sifting, thin brownish haze came a wind-driven cold front. San Antonians sneezed and choked in dust that clogged nos- rils, made eyes smart, and owered visibility to a half mile at times. AT 6 P.M. VISIBILITY in San Antonio had risen to two- and a half, miles due to the brown7 norther >vas that was due to lower the overnight temperature to 34 degrees. The cold front, expected to be in .the entire South Texas area the case to trial in Cameron County." There are two district courts {favorably with- much colder wea- in Cameron County, 103rd, with ther in other parts of Texas, at least 4S hours, compares gathering tax: i in Saturday's court session be- "I never saw anything of i fore Judge Laughlin, the judge this magnitude that didn't have tough sledding." A variety of other tax meas- ures are expected to be offered by members of the legislature. All such measures must origi- nate in. the House oi Represen- i tatives. j GOV. SHIVERS PLANS tdj detail his tax proposals in an address -to the law makers Monday. 'He declined to make any specific recommendations as to rates Friday. The ch'airma'n of the House Revenue and Taxation Com- mittee, Rep. D. H. Buchanan of Longview, has promised a full hearing for all measures. Pri- orities will be assigned in ac- cord with the governor's re- commendations, he said. Although the state constitu- tion limits the session to 30- days, Shivers legally could is- See SOLONS, Page 6A told the district attorney and de- fense attorney that he would re- serve the right to send the trial JUDGE LAUGHLIX IN DUVAL CONTEST See TRIAL, Page 6A Bank Injunction Asked By Quartet LOOK INSIDE FOR LOWDOWN ABOUT TAXES Know what the special session of the legisla- ture opening Monday nooon is all about? Do you care your tax dollar is spent? For an "at-a-glance" summation of issues fac- ing Texas lawmakers in Austin this month and for pictures of prepara- tions for the special ses- sion, turn to page gA of Sunday's Express-News. INSIDE TODAY Surprise Due If Old Folks Don't miss the special Lenten! f jflflf] series beginning today on Page 8-H in which members of the various explain why they belong to their- denomination. To- day it is "I Am A Lutheran." A Local, state, na- tional, international news; pic- ture page, 8-A, B General news sec- tion; editorials, 2-B; comment and opinion, 3-B; radio and television, 5 and 6-B; business and markets, 8 -and 9-B. C Classified advertis- ing; local news, 12-C. D Men's and sport news, 1 through 7-D; farm and ranch, 8-D; oil, 9-D; This Week in South IO-D. Texas, local news, E Chatter- box columns; weddings and en- gagements; club news, columns and features. F and soci- ety news; movies and amuse- ments. it. I haven't heard a thing defi nite about it. I don't know of G SECTION-Horaes and garden; i anyone that's been contacted, and BY UNITED PRESS AUSTIN, March 13.-State au- thorities indicated Saturday if Russell Jack Ballard of Wichita Falls produces old folks" on the capitol he Monday morning, they'll be surprised. Ballard, who turned leadership of the "march" on the capitol over to Arlon B. (Cyclone) Davis, said the group would start con- verging on Austin Sunday after- noon, "WE WILL PUT UP tents on the capitol grounds and camp there until the election if neces- Ballard said. However, R, C. Lanning, chair- man of the board of agency directly .esponsible for the statehouse building and no preparations were being made to receive any marchers. Laurence Ledbetter, superinten- dent of building and grounds, said, "there's iiothing we can do about real estate and building. H dog col- mnn, Uncle Ray's Corner, fash- lout, gag contest, 2-H; .food con- test, Our Texas Towns, 3-B; music, books, art, records, 4-H; crossword puzzle, photography, 5-H; movie-radio- TV pictured page; Earl Wilson and SheOah Graham columns; travel, 8-H. THIS WEEK Magazine and two big sections with South Texas' leading comics. I haven't made any preparations." BOTH LEDBETTER AND Lan- ning said to their knowledge, al- though many "marches" have been threatened, they knew of none that had ever materialized. Texas school teachers "march- ed" on the statehouse ii 1951. House Speaker Reuben 'Senter- fitt said he received a letter "some time' ago" from Ballard in which he threatened a march by the "old folks.'" "I didn't attach much signifi- cance to Senterfitt said. SPECIAL TO THB EXPRESS ALICE, March peti- tion seeking a temporary in- junction against the Texas State Bank of Alice was filed here Saturday afternoon by a group of four Duval County taxpayers. Hearing on the petition has- been set for 2 p.m. March 19. :THE PETITION ASKS that the bank be enjoined from pay- ing out and disbursing public funds- of Duval County "with- out requiring the genuine en- dorsement of the payee named in checks drawn against such public It also asks that the bank be enjoined from paying out such public funds "to fictitious, pay- and enjoined from paying and disbursing "such public funds to payees where the endorsement of the payee on such checks was forged." The petition for injunction was filed by J. J. Trevino, Amando L. Garcia, James L. McDonald, and John S. Mc- Aneac. It. lists officers of the bank as George B. Parr as president, G. A. Parr, active vice-presi- dent; and D. F. Donald, Jr., cashier. SATURDAY'S PE T1 T1 OX was the fourth such instru- ment filed the past week in- volving Duval County and Ben- avides Independent School Dis- trict funds. Earlier a restraining order was filed asking that no salary advancements be made to Du- val County officials or employ- es. A- second petition asks the stopping of the transfer of county monies from constitu- tional fund to another. The third.one was filed the past week petitioned that no advance in payments in the Benavides Independent School District be made from school funds to any official or em- ploye of the district. 'PVT. HARGROVE' l. AUTHOR TO MARRY MRS. ROOSEVELT UNITED PRESS NEW YORK, March 13.-Au- thor Marion Hargrove said Sat- urday he will marry beautiful Mrs. Robin Edwards Roosevelt, recently divorced wife of Curtis "Buzzic" Roosevelt, "sometime next week." "We're not disclosing the time or the the 34-year- old author of the wartime best seller, "See Here, Private Har- grove." "The ceremony will be as private as we can possibly make-it." Mrs. Roosevelt, 23, said they had decided to keep their plans c o n f 1 dential "to avoid pub- She ob- t a i n e d a "quickie" di- vorce from R o o s'e v e It, g r a n d son of the late Presi- dent Franklin D. Roosevelt, in Juarez, Hargrove last W 'e d n e s day. Storm Hits In Tampico Area B? ASSOCIATED PRESS TAMPICO, March though the hurricane season is from June to October, one with winds of 100 to 115 miles an hour reportedly drove about 30 boats from Brownsville and Corpus Tex., into the harbor here Saturday. Weather bureau officials said the reported hurricane does not show'on weather i maps and was probably just a local story. They doubted any such, dis- turbance would move north. Occasional gales were fore- cast for the Gulf of Campeche, however. Most hurricanes which have hit the Texas coast have formed ih the Gulf of iampeche. Today's Chuckle Sign in a store window: "Sale of bath towels for the whole damp family." where freezing temperatures are forecast. Alamo City residents can ex- pect the dusty air to clear some- what Sunday and the weather bureau says dust nuisance "will probably be gone by Monday." High Temperature predicted for Sunday in San Antonio is only 5S degrees. THE RIO GRANDE VALLEY was blanketed by one. of the worst dust storms' seen there. Visibil- ity was not more than a half mile. The dusty winds swept over that area about 32 noon and will continue through Suriday'although the weatherman said it "will re- main cool." General temperatures for the- Valley will range from 56 ,to' 60 along the 'coast'to 42 to 62 In the i Mission-Edinburg area. Throughout the-state tempera- tures dropped fast behind the cold front and thermometers plummetted as much as ten degrees an hour as the wina- driven norther bored Southward through a high wall of swirling grit that covered the entire state. The weather bureaus said the dust ranged'from New Mexico to Missouri. Westerly winds swept the brownish h'aze over the state from the New Mexico border and northerly'winds, ever increasing, pushed the dust southward as far as the Gulf -Coast. The we'atier bureau, issued They had been married almost four years. Hargrove, who also has writ- ten a novel, "Something's Got to was divorced in Jua- rez in 1950 from Mrs. Alison Pfeiffer Hargrove after eight years of marriage. He has two children, Christopher and Pene-' lope.. Mrs. Roosevelt has a by her mar- riage to the son of the former Anna Roosevelt and Curtis Dall. small craft warning from Browns- ville 'to St. .Marks, Fla., ,with nor- therly winds predicted at-25 to 35 miles an hour. DUST ALL BUT OBSCURED the sun .in'San Antonio Saturday when: Express Reporter Hal S.wigget' snapped this picture. It was indeed a dust-iirbing sight IN LATEST RIFT Me Army Testimony BY ONiTED.pREss- 0[ the Armed Services Commit- MILWAUKEE, Wis., March 13. jlee> the jenner internal Security Sen. Joseph McCarthy said Sat-1 Subcommittee of a subcommittee in-day he'would turn- ovjer the rules .committee. manship of his Senate McCarthy said he would hold a mittee temporarily to Sen. Karl E. Mundt and would testify under oath himself on his latest dispute with the Army. STIFF 'WESTERLY winds j The Wisconsin'Republican said raked the state in added more dirt to the towering dust clouds. There were gusts to .50 miles an hour at Dalhart, to 40 miles per hour in Dallas, and to 37 miles per hour at Laredo. Except for a 'shallow line fog and drizzle along the im- mediate coast, the thin, choking dust covered nearly every nook and cranny of Texas. It sifted be- tween windows to cover carpets and furniture. It left auto. In- teriors grimy and dirty and gen- erally added evident. to any misery Houston had a light rain Satur- day morning, the only precipita- tion other than heavy, fog in the state. The fog line merged'with the blowing dust near'the coast ine. Only some the deepest See DUST, Page 6A he would turn over the chair- manship 'of South Da- kota Republican who is the rank- ing member of McCarthy's sub- committee, for an inquiry into the controversy over Roy Cohn, the subcommittee's chief counsel. COHN HAS BEEN ACCUSED of trying to get the Army to give preferential treatment to.G. David Schine, a former McCarthy aide who now is an Army private. McCarthy flatly 'rejected Mundt's proposal that the inquiry be given to some other Senate committee. "No other committee is going to tell us who to hire and he said. Mundt had that the Conn-Army affair be turned over to some other Senate committee, perhaps a special subcommittee HEW BUILDING BOOM SENDS INDUSTRY TO RECORD HIGH meeting of his subcommittee Tuesday morning. "I will insist on being put under oath also to get on record the at- tempt of the Army to get us to junk the investigation of Commu- nists in the he said. He said-he wants to get on rec- ord his ,own .testimony on the case of Maj. Irving Peress, an Army .dentist' who refused to take a loyalty oath. but was gfven an honorable discharge. MCCARTHY SAID the Army's charge- that' Cohn tried to gain preferential treatment of Schine is untrue.. The Army report on the Cohn-Schine" affair was written by Army'Counsel John Adams. Commenting' on a statement by Seri. Charles E..Potter who said Cohn should be fired if the ''Army' charges are true, Mc- Carthy said: "It's, reasonable to suggest that both1 Adams 'and Cohn come be- fore the committee as soon as Fair Program Demanded In Blistering Talk BY ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON, March i Vice President Nixon asserted Saturday night that "reckless talk" and "questionable meth- ods" of some congressional Communist hunters are threat- ening President Eisenhower's and forward looking program." He declared in a nation-wide TV-radio broadcast that when Communist hunters in Con- gress "shoot wild" they may let the "rats 'get away." Mentioning Sen. Joseph Mc- Carthy at the be- ginning of 3 nationally tele- vised and broadcast address, the vice president said Presi- dent Eisenhower "is right in insisting on fair play" in in- vestigations. "WHEN WE use unfair methods of fighting Commu- nish we help destroy freedom he said. methods, he said, "give ammunition to those who op- pose any action against "Com- munism." While Nixon did not link Mc- Carthy directly with these re- marks, he said at the outset that he hnd received a sheaf of messages giving him con- flicting advice to "attack Mc- and others urging him to ignore the Wisconsin sena- tor. The vice-president, replying to charges by Adlai E. Steven- son that the Republicans have embraced be- gan -his address by saying that he was not going to "deliver any political tirade." "THE BEST answer is the he said, adding that this view was concurred in by'Pres- ident Dwight Eisenhower. 1952 Uemocralic presidential nominee, charged last Saturday night at Miami that the Eisenhower administration was embracing "McCarthyism" and was "half McCarthy and half Ei- senhower." Recognizing the boiling row now going on between McCarthy and Sec. of the Army Stevens, Nixon said he wanted to pledge the Re- publican party to'fair investiga- tions of Communism. He said a lot of people wondered why anybody had to be fair in dealing with "a gang of traitors." The suggestion was to "shoot them lie said. "BUT WHEN you are dealing with a. bunch of rats and you go out to shoot them, you must shoot he said. "When you shoot wild it not only means that the rats may get away but you might hit someone else who is trying to shoot rats too." "The President, this adminis- tration and the responsible leader- ship of the Republican, party in- sists, whether it is the executivt See NIXON, Page 6A U.S. Wins Major Anti-Red Vote BS: ONITED PRESS CARACAS, Venezuela, March The.lJhrted States won an overwhelming victory at the BY tmrrED PRESS NEW YORK, March 13 A con- struction boom lifted the-, build' ing industry ;tq record highs dur- ing the first two months, of '1954, surprising economists who Had orecast a recession, a survey disclosed Saturday. v The F.. W. Dodge Corporation, constru6iion news and marketing existing for spending 6n new bulld- ,ngs were smashed in 37 states- and. thrae major cities surveyed January aid The gross figure was 000, nine per cent ahead of the previous January-February record set in 195LJt was 13 per cent greater than the first two months of 1953, which wound up as a record-breaking year. The February total was six per cent greater 'than that for Janu- ary, despite -the usual tendency for construction to drop o'ff. slight- ly in February, the report said. Dodge said the over-all figures "indicate high future employment of. -labor and- high future sales of materials "in one of the nation's basic industries." A Dodge spokesman said the building industry is one of the. keystones'of the economy, usually sen-ing as a reliable barometer, to the state of the nation's busi- ness. Reports 6n_the first two 'months of the year make it possi- ble, he said, to hope, a new busi- ness upturn has started.1 The words "sur- prisingly strong" and "dynamic" were used by Dodge to describe what happened in the construction industry in January and February. The increase in investments in new busines- buildings and heavy. engineering projects' came despite a Dodge forecast last November that the dollar volume of contracts would drop out three-per cent this year. Red Plane Charge Answer Delayed BY ASSOCIATED PRESS MUNICH, Germany, March. 13. J.S. authorities delayed Saturday night answering a Communist gov- ernment accusation that two American Navy planes flew into Czechoslovakia's uranium mining region before-they were .driven off by a cannon-firirig jet inter- ceptor. Western newsmen were barred rom interviewing the two un- scratched American pilots or see- ng their planes at Neubiberg Air Base near here. One of the planes was damaged by MIG shellfire. A spokesman in London for U.S. 17.to 1, ,Only..Gu ate mala, whose foreign minister repeatedly has told the conference that his country was 'not Communist, votett. .against the declaration which' warned international Communism against trying to invade the western hemis- phere. Mexico and Argentina ab- stained pn the vote for the resolution proposed by U.. S. Sec. of State John Foster Dulles, tion when the official American version would be released'. If for any reason you fail to receive your Sunday paper Coll G-3131 Circulation Depar rt BEFORE NOON and one will be delivered by special messenger.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication