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San Antonio Express and News Newspaper Archive: February 7, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: San Antonio Express and News

Location: San Antonio, Texas

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   San Antonio Express and News (Newspaper) - February 7, 1954, San Antonio, Texas                                Fair and Mild See Details Column 1 TWO Great Separate Daily Newspapers Combined Into ONE Great Sunday Newspaper Final Edition CopyrigKt, 1954, by Express Publishing NO YEAR C SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1954 134 PAGES IN 10 SECTIONS 15 CENTS SECTION A NEW QUAKES HIT IN MEXICO Beeville Rancher To Seek Johnson Senatorial Office S.A. Pedestrian Accidents Show FewConvictions UNITED PRESS AUSTIN, Feb. T. Dougherty, multi- millionaire freshman member of the Texas Legislature, Saturday announced his candidacy for the U. S. Senate post now held by Lyndon B. Johnson. Dougherty, 30-year-old Beeville rancher and oil operator, said he would Democratic sena- torial nomination as a restult of a "continuous flow of letters from [individuals and groups over the state during the past seven JOHNSON, Democratic leader of the senate, is now serving his first term in the upper chamber. He won his seat in 1948 by the slim margin of 87 votes in a his- toric race against' former Gov. Coke Stevenson. Although Johnson has not for- mally announced for re-election, he returned from Congress last Prices of Milk To Be Reduced Monday in 5.A. By CHARLES ROSS Staff Writer San Antonio had 416 pedestrian accidents last year, yet only seven of the drivers were convicted of "aggravated assault with a motor vehicle." What's the statistics: Let's analyze senate. OF THE 418 accidents in which a car hit a pedestrian, the San Antonio police department's traf- fic division presented to the dis- trict 'attorney's office a total of 305 cases. The rest weren't pre- sented because of "a lack of wit- nesses and inability to prove neg- A quart of milk will be a penny cheaper in the San Antonio roilkshed Monday Local dairymen announced Sat urday_ they had agreed on the lower "price ahead of an expectec statement on how much less they must pay producers per hundred- wei-ght under an' agreement worked out with federal market- ing officials. THE RETAIL PRICE will be 24 cents a quart for homogenized milk. For pasteurized it will 'be 23 cents a quart. The price will be correspond- ingly lower for the Jialf in some places as low as 47.5 cents -for homogenized and 42.5 cents a quart .for pasteurized across the counter. The Monday date for the price drop was fixed at a meeting of representatives'of the largest dis- jtributors last week following the announcement that the difference in amount to be paid producers in the San Antonio milk-shed could exceed that in the Dallas areas price of truth. Enormous finances by no more than 50 cents per and powerful groups are behind fall and immediately launched into a speaking campaign carry- ing ail the ear-marks of a man intent on retaining his seat in "No one seems to be willing to speak out against Senator John- son's Dougherty said. "No one seems willing to risk the the senator. I, for one, have no personal feeling against the sena- tor. If he had done the right thing ligence on the part -of the driver." i country 'and his state I The head of the. traffic divis- j not quarrel with him. I ion's case preparation unit, Ltjwouid him instead." Samuel signed re-, DOUGHERTY, an outspoken ceJpts for the 305 cases given of Americall foreign policy, the district attorney's office, is of an organization Of these 305 cases only 23 were is knovm as. {he presented for trial by members American Victory." by the complaint section of the! Ho for TJ.A.'s office with this result: Seven drivers were convicted; five cases were dismissed; and 11 are still pending. THE MAXIMUM PENALTY upon conviction of aggravated as- sault on a pedestrian with a motor venicle (not a felony) is two years a fine of These figures came to light He bitterly opposed the Korean truce terms last July and in half- page ads in St. Louis and San'An- hundredweisht. The price to be paid producers will be. announced Saturday by Orville A. Jaminson, area milk administrator. The current price is per hundredweight. The producer price drop is expected to be 3S to 40 cents per hundred- weight, dairymen estimate. "WE ARE ACTING as a result of the announcement of the lower srice to be_ paid to producers al- .hough that price hasn't been said C. L. Wallace, assist- ant manager of the Borden Com- tonio newspapers called the pro- j pany. "The price to be set OPENING." NIGHT congratulations went to San Antonio Symphony Con- .ductor Victor Alessandro, center, Sat- urday, as the curtain went up on the Alamo. City's tenth Grand Opera Fes- SECOND OPERA SUNDAY tiyol. .On hand in his dressing room at the performance of "Othello" were Mrs. .Lewis Koyton, Mrs. Ferdinand Burite of Chicago, Bunte and Kaytorv left to Photo. Grand Opera Festival Opens in San Antonio By GERALD ASHFORD Staff Writer Rounding out a. decade of high Saturday as Bureau of Safety spector John Fitch completed his annual inventory of city traffic safety activities for the National Safety Council and were com- piled by his office during the past several weeks. Chief' of Police George W. Bichsel commented: "To the best of knowledge every ca.se taken 1o the D.A.'s office is supported by police in- vestigation r e p o r t s and state- ments'that indicate some negli- gence or some violation of the law on the part of the driver. "I'D LIKE TO GET prosecution posal "a -disgrace, a base, vile surrender and betrayal." He linked Johnson's name with "political opportunism." "It is he said, See RANCHER, Page 9A be retroactive to Feb. 1. We are lowering our retail and whole- OF GORILLA Doctors Find Tissue Cause Of Paralysis BY UNITED PRESS SARASOTA, Feb. 6. A prominent brain specialist, aided stepped up. There's nothing like I by three doctors and three nurses, a good conviction record to deter I probetl the brain of jjttle Tpto violations." j Saturday and found that abnormal tissue caused the valuable circus sale prices in anticipation of scppe Verdi's "Otello''at the Mu- that-" nicipai Auditorium Satur- day night-. detailed 'in. other columns ot this newspaper, the Festival will continue this Sunday and next Saturday and Sunday with three other major operas, combining that. The price reduction is the first change in the cost of milk here in nearly a year. The retail price cents higher than the whole- sale been 25 cents a quart for homogenized and 24 for pasteurized. of the complaint section in the gorilla's paralysis. D.A.'s office for not formally fit- Dr. Mason T.rupp of Tampa said ing the 282 cases in court were: iafter the and one.haif hour 1. The injured pedestrian didie operation that a not wish to file charges because, in most cases, they had been paid damages by the insurance com- pany or driver of the car prior to the time the case' was pre- sented to the D.A.'s office. Cohen said the D.A.'s office had a file of'assault-on-pedestrian ac- Sce 9A Slightly Cooler Temperatures Due The ardor of spring for South Texas is expected to cool some- what Sunday. The high temperature will dip to 65 in San Antonio, and in the Rio Grande Valley and South Texas tie highs will be in the high 70s. San Antonio may expect gener- ally 'fair and mild weather with to moderate northerly tumor or a parasitic invasion had damaged the right side of little Toto's brain. "WE WILL MAKE tests of fluid and tissue drawn from her-brain and will know in the next two or three days what the next step will be." Trupp said. The 58-pound gorilla, "as pa- thetic as a sick awakened from the.anesthetic and was taken to the bedroom of her nurse, Mrs. Lucille Todd. Trupp said Toto i should have little move pain than two aspirins will cure "and 'she will get the aspirins." Wrapped warmly in a blanket and cradled in the arms of her nurse. Toto fixed a brief glassy stare on the scene, yawned drows- ily and appeared to go back to sleep as Mrs. Todd carried her out. "WE CAN'T SAY the operation was a success or not a Trupp said, "It was of a diagnos- not a corrective oper- ation. If it is found that parasites have-reached her brain through the blood stream she will be are predicted. The same forecast medically. If there is a holds for South Texas. See GORILLA, Page 9A ,74 4 pjn......72 5 p.m......70 6 p.m......6S 7 p.m......65 B p.m......60 II p.m......51 winds. In .the Valley, mostly scattered clouds and slightly cooler tem- peratures through Sunday night TEMPERATURES 5 a.m......44 3 p.m 6 son......44 7a.m......44 S a.m......44 9 a.m......49 10 a.m......69 11 a.m......69 12 noon.....76 1 p.m......76 2 10 p.m......57 11 p.m......56 Today's Chuckle It takes very little to please some folks. There was the fire }ly, for instance, who learned to fly backwards and, while practic- Symphony's 10th "Annual Grand Opera Festival opened with Giu- Tuxes, Gowns Make Colorful Opening Night By BOBBE LENTS Woman's Editor See Other-Pictures, Page 4B who like therr women tfre.ir. i di- Very also', like their retted by'Charles Stone.and Ira'' the" talents of some of the world's leading'singers with the abilities of the San Antonio Symphony Or- the San Antonio jchostra-andits "Victor. Huge Death Toll Feared In Area BY UNITED.PREaS TUXTLA GUTIERREZ, 6.. New earthquakes rocked southernmost Mexico Saturday where loss of life already was feared heavy' from a series of devastating shocks that.destroyed four towns and sent landslides rumbling over' rich farming, areas. Travelers arriving here from the stricken area said panicky in- habitants fled to the mountains Jin terror and that there were "numerous deaths and hundreds of injured walking dazed in the rubble." XiUIZ SERRANO, secretary-gen- eral oi' Chiapas State where the quakes occurred, said the .first heavy quake struck shortly be- fore noon Friday and lasted for minutes. Six lesser quakes hit the area Saturday, he said. Serrano said the state govern- ment was unable to give any of-" ficiai estimate yet, of the casual- ties and damage but announced that federal troops were ordered there to prevent looting and to restore order. ".We are taking all precautions to prevent personal losses in case any .new earthquakes rock the he said. The scene of destruction, about 50 miles Jn1 diameter, was cen- tered about 80 miles northeast of this state Official sources described it ,ag "very destruc- tive." Chiapas; a coffee grow- ing state, ..borders on the Pacific Ocean, Guatemala and the Isth- mus of -Tehu'antepec. CENTURIES OLD STONE nBlruclures toppled and many other buildings Were wrecked In the four small coffee centers which had a population of about Telephone and telegraph communications were out and complete estimates of the dam- age were not yet possible. MAP OF MEXICO Guatemala border area locates towns hardest hit in a series of earthquakes. Towns underlined werij Wirephote Map. Pope Shows Slight Gain Renay Bowles and Ruth Mat- lock's ballet dancers. "OTELLO" IS THE ONLY one of this year's three operas that has not been presented 'here be- fore. Although it is musically as great as anything Verdi ever did, it is not likely to achieve'- a high rating on the popularity ballots which are toeing distributed to the. opera audiences. This is likely to be the case because a work of Ver- di's later years, was influenced by the then new trend in. opera whiclr did away with set peices designed to show off the vocal prownesaof the stars. Rather' the orchestration 'and the vocal score are blended together into one con- tinuous piece of music in-each act, with an almost symphonic, effect, that is a long way from jihe brilliant arias of such an opera as "La Traviata." For' their performances -in this highly, demanding opera, almost equal'honovs should go to Ramon Vinay as Otello, the Moor of See OPERA, Page 4B Youth Admits Killing Again BY ASSOCIATED PRESS DALLAS, Feb. Lee Walker', 19-year-old Negro service i staiion attendant, signed a second statement Saturday admitting the slaying of Mrs, H. C. Parker last 12 irjdt 54 j was delighted. ing, flew into an electric fan. He PROVIDING little girts like Linda Lou Davis with milk will be less a problem financially for parents in the San Antonio milkshed starting Monday- Linda, who obviously goes for milk in a big way, is the daughter of Mrs. Lucille Davis, 316 San Pedro Ave. Photo. The new statement was made to Dlst. Atty, Henry .Wade. "I'm satisfied he's our Wade said. 'As soon as the-grand jury returns an indictment we will put him on trial and try to send him to the electric chair." The distript attorney said the statement Walker signed at p.m. was similar to the or.e he made to Homicide Gapt. Will Fritz of the .Dallas Police Depart- ment a week ago except that It contained more detail. There was nothing in the statement. Wade and in-San -Antonio-.they stage it manner. It was in :thc grand manner that local .residents and visitors from all of .South Texas turned out in evening, gowns and tuxes S a t u r-d a y night, as "Otello' opened .the tenth season of the San. Antonio Symphony Grand Opera Festival. MUCH OF THE SPOTLIGHT was on the Opening night au'di: ence-as socialites hurried to their boxes and seats in the orchestra section, Entertaining a party, of friends were Mr. and Mrs...B. B: McGimsey in their'center-of-the house box. Symphony Society 'ex-President and Mrs. Lester A. Nordan were hosts in their box-to their law and daughter; Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Lindsay, and to Dr. and Mrs. Robert Nixon. Mrs. Nordan will again be on hand, 'with Mrs. Merton Sunday's per- formance of "La In the' Nordan box on Sunday will be the Lindsays and their daughter, Marlon, and Mr. and Mrs. -Hal Hudson and their daughter, Les- lie. With the' E. B.'. MeFarlins in their box Saturday evening .were Mrs. John Bennett and young Miss Heather, McEarlin. Mrs. John Wells Heard entertained a party of friends in her box, as did Mr.'and Mrs. L. J. Kocurek. Chatting in their box during in- termission were the Mesdames W.'B. Osborn, Jr. A group of faculty members of .-the University of -Texas; Fine. A r t s Department occupied the box of Mrs. Edgar Tobin, Symphony So- See OPENINGsTPage 4B said, about Parker. the rape of Mrs. Waile had said'earlier that lie- detector tests showed Walker had "guilty knowledge" of the rape- slaying. Mother; 7 Tots Perish in Blaze BY UNITED PRESS SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Feb. A 30-year-old woman and seven children perished Saturday in a fire that destroyed her home and Assistant Fire Chief Sam Rob- ards said a thorough investigation of reaching the outside ivorld said it would be days be- fore there could be an accurate count of casualties. Mexican authorities ordered the Air Force to stand by to drop food to survivors in' isolated areas where a general shortage was reported. Mexican relief or- ganizations began mobilizing to send food and medicine shipments in. Travelers from the devastated area said Tila, a town of persons, was "virtually erased from the map." In Yajalon, the largest of the four towns with a population of the Catholic Church was destroyed and the city hall, jail1, market and other old stone.build- ings were damaged severely. SOME 90 PER CENT of the homes there were damaged -and their occupants abandoned them, fearing new earthquakes. INSIDE TODAY A state, na- tional, international news; pic- .ture page, Ifl-A. B news; Edi- torials, 2-B; Views of News, columns, radio-TV snpplement, 5 and 6-B; business and markets, 8-B; farm, and ranch, 9-B. C. advertis- ing; religion in review, 12-C. D and sports; outdoor'page, S-D; South Texas snd Gulf oil, 9-D. E and en- gagements, fashioni, clubs, col- umns. F SECTION Schools and col- leges, debutantes, beauty; movies and amusements, 6 and 7-F. G SECTION and gar- BY ASSOCIATED PRESS VATICAN Csity, Feb. 6-Popt Piu XII .was able to maintain Satur- day a flicker of renewed strength 1 noted during an anxious night, but doctors kept up a constant bed- side over the stricken 77- year-old Pontiff. Prof. Riccardo Galeazzi Lisi. Pope's personal physician, repor- ted symptoms of s. "very slight improvement" but said general weakness persisted. Later the Vat- ican press office announced the slight improvement continued dur- ing the day. THESE WORDS kindled hope among millions of Roman Cathol- ics who offered up prayers in many parts of the'World for their ailfog .spiritual leader. From his sim- ple wooden; bed in his apostolic palace apart- ment the pale and gaunt Pope painfully gave instructions and conferred for an hour with his i'aithful pro-sec- retary of state, Msgr. Giovanni. Batista. MontinJ. The Pope has been confined to his bed for 33 days with a stub- born and not fully: explained in- ternal ailment. It attacked his aged bod yat a time when he was weary and worn from prolonged" overwork. Unable to hold down his usual meager diet, his. condition has grown dangerously .feeble. Intra- venous feeding has become neces- sary. The Pope's inability to keep dinvn-fluids has made it impos- sible to conduct further X-Ray examinations of his condition, described'at first as a persistent gastric ailment. A (source close to the Pope said the next five days were believed important in the outcome of his Ken McClure's Condition Worse Ken McClure, 52, well-known in the- Southwest, as a newscas- Pope the1 holocaust had been or- dered. statement a week agoj Four of. the .children were the killing the dime store, clerk. A day later he orally admitted he also raped her. But a' few days later he repudiated both the written statement, and the oral admission and asserted he knew nothing of the case. woman's. three belon- ged to; a neighbor. Fire. Department authorities and police were unable to deter- mine the origin of the fire that small frame house in 'less than an hour. dens; decorating, luraitnre a turn for the worse real estate and Saturday night at Nix Hospital where lie was reported in critical condition. Earlier in the day his condition had been reported as serious. Mc- Clure was admitted'to the hos- pital Wednesday, suffering from an advanced liver disease. "Up until Friday he rllicd, but Saturday morning he suffered a stroke and is in a comatose con- a bulletin from Dr. F. W, Steinberg's office announced. McClore's lllnass was diagnosed last June for the first appliances; building. H Magazine (features, fashions, crossword puzzle, travel, food, records, stamps, books, art, movies, Earl Wilson, SheQah Graham, pets, photography, Uncle Ray's column. AND DON'T overlook America's finest weekly, "This Week Mag- and South Texas' larg- er.! comic icction.   

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