Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Port Arthur News: Monday, August 25, 1947 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Port Arthur News (Newspaper) - August 25, 1947, Port Arthur, Texas                               Mancheno Seizes Presidency of Ecuador in Bloodless Coup _____________________ ___________. c n i k i tikjki _. SAVE THE EASY WAY! INVEST IN SAVINGS BONDS AND KEEP THEM The Port Arthur News STORY IN COLUMN FOUR Tomorrow's Weather Partly Cloudy (Details at bottom or FORTY-SIXTH 237. Leased wires of AP. UP and INS PORT ARTHUR, TEXAS, MONDAY, AUGUST 25, 1947. Today's Newsreel Officials Probing Illness of National Guards OKLAHOMA CITY, AUK. 25 officials today blame box lunches for sending 31 members of the 180th Infantry, 45th division to a hospital vesterdav with food poisoning. Box lunches doled out aboard trains takinjr soldiers home from th Oklahoma national Guard encampment at Fort Sill appeared respons ble for the sudden attacks, but hundreds of other men ate sandwiche from the same lot and apparently suffered no ill effects. Ten of the stricken men were listed in serious, but not critica condition. No Successor To Be Appointed to Bilbo's Post Miss.. AUK. 25 Fieldin? Wright today an- nounced that he would not appoint a. successor to fill out the unexpir- ed tei m of the late Sen Bilbo un less a special session of Consres is called before Nov. 4. On Nov. 4 a new Senator be chosen i Mississippi's general election. Additional Persons Barred in Hungary Voting VIENNA. Auir, 25 Budapest dispatches reported today tha rnanv persons have been barred from voting in Hunjrarv in a Corrmunist drive to assure victory in forthcoming general elections. According to the Budapest reports, many voters have been purree from the eligibility lists by Ihe device of havine two citizens lestif that, they are "politically unreliable." The United States already ha protested the Communist campaign to nullify tho opposition in thi elections. Britain Favors Broadening of Greek Governmen LONDON, Aug. 25 for- eign office spokesman said today that the British government favors "broadening" the Gieek govern- ment The spokesman, comment- ing on the Greek cabinet crisis, said, "It has always been the pol- icy of his majesty's governmen that the Greek kovernment shoul represent all loyal Greek parties Broadening the government cer tainlv will meet the approval an suppoil of his majesty's govern mcnt." And All They Found Was Burnt Pieces of Toast! SAN ANTONIO. Aug. 25 ccnrral nlarm sounded nt Inc San Antonio fire dfpartment. Bells clanged, sirens walled, and traffic WHS cleared for thrpo. fire companies, one flrp chief, one pa'rnl eHr- om' newspaper reporter and one radio reporter. Hhen nil arrived ot the. residence on the outskirts of the city they found two burnt pieces of toast. Gen. Wedemeyer Visits With Gen. Eichelberge TOKYO. AIIE. 25 Gen. Albert C. Wedemcve head of President Truman's fact finding mission to China and Korea, lunch- ed today with LI. Gen. Robert L. Eichclbergcr. commander of tho U S. Eighth Army in Japan. H was scheduled to spend the da conferring with other officials o Gen. Douglas MacArthur's head Quarters, seeking information 01 Korea. Mexicans Seize Another American Fishing Boat MEXICO CITY. Auc. 25 Navy ministry reported toda-v tha, a. Mexican coast guard cutter took the American fishing boa' cu.ftodv on 21 and escorted her to Ensenada Lower California, after approaching the craft for a routine inspection and finding the crew with "guns In their hands." T, Jan? to Ensenada bv coast guard cutter No M were exchanged. The Peggy Jane wa Taylor Returns to Vatican Early; To See Pope VATTfA-V OK Aug. 25 Myron C. Tavlor. presidential en- voy to the Vatican, returned to his post unheralded today two days ahead of schedule and prepared for an audience with the pope. Vntl can sources said Taylor probably would SPO the pope Tuesday morn- ing "at the papal summer residenc at Castel Gandolio. Jester Home From Visits to Guatemala, Mexico or other when the governor left on his air fillinK these' he to start a surpr se announccd MARSHALL, Tex., Aug. 25 Findings and recommendations nf Senatf subrommlttofl Investiga- tion in the po.ilofflco situation here won't be mndo public for some Postoffice Probe Are Kept Secret lime. Sen. William Langer (R- Mmn.) said after Saturday's two sessions, that the Investigation of romnlnlntn nt postotflro would not he revcaloel until Congress con- venes In January. Virginia Hill's Condition Described as 'Good' Aas- 25 dNSl.-Physicians today described as good the condition of Virginia Hill, girl friend of the late gang- She Was taken to St Frances Detectivo Chief Cha.les W. Pierce said (hat Miss Hill's taking the coma attempt." She lapsed into a coma, but began to improve ovor the weekend. British People Fast Losing Faith in UN, Claim Aug. In Unlt-il Nntloim. Thr Uiiidon riitlly wurnrd editorially fixiny (lint tho British people nrr "fiint loilng iiililml, "Tim Is when tlui Hrltlsli will tn tako KcrlrniK thought ovr-r tin; vnliin of (Jin UN orgiinl7.ntlon." Condition of Adm. King Improves, Navy Says ,v, AUC- 25 Navy announced today that the condition of Adm. Ernest J. King, confined to Bethesda' Naval hospital following a slight stroke, has improved. A Navy bulletin said His condition has improved and he is now up and about his room His activities, will bo gradually increased." The dfl-vear-old former navnl chief o! operations suffered ft slight stroke without paralysis several days ago. DeGoulle Launches His New Party Into Politics 11 T-. f, PARIS, Auc. 25 fion. Charles DeGaullr formally launched his Union of French ppopjp Into the national political fironH today an announcement that it would enter candidates in the Oc- tober municipal elections. The an- nouncement snld thatils candidales would include "men and women of diverse tendcnclon, but who have become colleagues In the tasks of public welfare." 12 PAGES PRICE FIVE CENTS BATTLE' OVER KOREA MOUNTS Big Hurdle Believed Cleared at Talks in Brazil Attempt To Ousl Colonel Blamed In Regime's Fall Trujillo, at Parley In Brazil, To Keep Foreign Office Post QUITO, Ecuador, AUR. 25 Carlos Mancheno erstwhile minister of defense was self-proclaimed ruler o Ecuador today after the blood less overthrow and exile of Piesi dent Jose Maria Velasco Ibarra. Tho colonel Sunday that Velasco Ibarra had resignec called upon tho army for suppor and issued a decree In which h assumed "the function of executiv power as in charse of the presi Uencv of the republic." He lolc reporters he would summon all po litlcal parties to advise him in choice of a cabinet. To Columbia Twelve hours after his reportei resignation, Velasro Ibarra and hi Argentine-horn wife. Mrs. Corlua Parral dc Volasco Ibarra, flow tc Call, Colombia, where the Colombl an government jrranted them ret UEC. His downfall was believed to have stemmed from his effort to ous Mancheno from his cabinet, in which the colonel had served since a revolution established the Vclas co Ibarra administration in mid lfl'14. Heavy armored car movements Saturday foreshadowed the revolt a surprise to most residents of tltis capital. Late that night a deleea- .ion ot nrmv officers went to the palace. Tho preakkin- lal guard fired one shot but then old the officers had come to cal on Velasco Ibarra, let them eo in Pto Chance at Petropolls The president, taken into cus- odv. was granted an interview Afith Mancheno. and at a. m Sunday the colonel issued a pur- ported statement from Velasco Ibarra which said he was resienina 'for the sake of the republic." and md handed over power to the de- ense minister. Mancheno said hp would ask ose Vicente Trujillo, chief of Ecuador's dcleeation to the Inter- American Defense conference at etropolis, Brazil, to stay on as orciEn minister. Jews Demonstrate Against 'Exodus' JERUSALEM, Aug. 25 3alestme's Jews demon- crated their sympathy for the Exodus 194.7" refugees today bv one-day fast and bitter protest, meetings. British police and troops stood v for imv eventuality should the Ironi; fcollng Jewish oom- iniillv ovor Mm u in Illc'nal liniiilKi-nnlji Jlaniliurg nrnmnv. rociill In violence. The 4400 refugees were relurnec the coast of Palestine lo Por 'ii Bone, [''raiioo. Thny wore trnun illinocl lo whon Ihc-v rn isod British orders lo disembark The Stern cantr distributed leaf is callintr on the Jews for "iota ar" against the British Home-Grown Storm Batters Galveston Winds Hit 70-Mile Peck Over Island and at Texas City; Disturbance Raining Itself out By William C. Barnard GALVESTON, Aug. 25 vicious home-grown tropical storm that formed off the Texas coast and scored a bull's eye on Galveston, explosion-scarred Texas City and -f Winds up to 45 Miles Are Felt in City Houston, plunged inland about 100 miles today and was blowing itself out in rain squalls. The storm, at one time of hurri- cane Intensity, materialized Friday in tho Gulf of Mexico, played cat- and-mouse with Galveslon for two days, then struck Sunday afternoon with 70-mile winds. Several Casualties Reported Several casualties and property damage resulted. Joseph M. Taber of Galveston was killed when he came in con- tact with a fallen power line. St. Mary's hospital reported today it had treated several persons inlured by flying debris. The Coast Guard continued its search for the 46-foot, fishing boat, the Linda K, which sailed Friday with a three-man craw and has not been seen since. Near Houston 35 to 40 Negro prisoners at the Ramsey prison farm took advantage of howling winds and torrential rains there to saw their way, to freedorri. Ten were recaptured, but the others are believed to have headed for Houston. Storm Far Inland The Weather bureau at Houston aaid the storm was as far Inland as Temple, 200 miles from the coast, with ram squalls reported. In Galveston, J, P. Naughton, Weather bureau chief, Bald the storm was mldwav between Hous- ton and Austin, the state capitol, about 60 or 70, miles inland. The advisory issued by the U. wind Chief effects here from Sun- day's tropical slorm which swept inland near Galveston were windy gusts up to 4ii miles an hour and rainfall ot better than two and a half inches, the Weath- er bureau reported, today. Southeast winds icnchccl a veloc- ily of 45 mlloa nn linui in gusts Sunday nboul p. in., the bu- reau said. No dnmase was report- He-Opened of it recorded ed. Highway 87 Rainfall, most in the Houstori iS'e'aT'would grad- ually subside but would probably 5low 50 to 60 miles an hour today in an area 75 miles to the north- (Turn to Page 3, Col, 3) Edison's Widow Dies in New York NEW YORK, Aug. 25 Mrs. MIna Miller Edison, 82, widow of Thomas A. Edison, tlio Inventor, lied Sunday night at Prosbvtcrlnn lospltal whole r.he had been criti- cally ill for seveial weeks. Funeral arrangements were to be made to- day. _ Death was attributed by her phy- ician. Dr. James A. Goss, Jr. to a cardiac failure. Her three chil- ren were at her bedside when she died at p. m. Her home was n West Orange, N. .1 CIO Pickets Clash With Police at Detroit Plant DETROIT Aus- 25 70 CIO United Auto Workers rickets, clashed with police at the strikebound Huck Manufacturing company plant today and a union official was injured in the melee police arrested five pickets, includine Emil Mazey. a UAW co- reirjonal directpr and prominent contract negotiator for the union Peter Lpper. vice president of striking UAW Local 212 was taken to receiving hospital with skull lacerations V members of local Arthur time) TuesCay. A mass 716 are affected by the" Senators Will Visit U. SjOccupation Zones (R.-S. D.) said today rMr, Xovembe? AUf' armed services subcomraitloos will survey American and the Pacific during October and muazoaes- tlie fu" declared that the traveling complete understandme of conditions in the occu- Four Groups Complete Ruhr Coal Mining Studies WASHIN WASHINGTON, AUK. 25 (INS) Four working groups at the U S.-Brilish Ruhr coal talks have completed studies of mining sup- plies. miners' housing and food conditions and will submit their findings to the full committee this aflernoon. 11 is expected that a full agreement would be reached 'his week: They have boon study- ing those Issues, In rclallon to pro- duction. Siamese Twins' Condition Is Reported 'Only Fair' 0CK SPINGS' WVO" AUK- 25 al Wyoming rcportrd early today that the condition of rare Sia- General hospital "rain Fire Kills 27 BERLIN, Aug. 25 A train i-e fatal to 27 persons brought Ihe n film operator Inday 01 iai-gcs of violating regulation oncoming the transport of film 01 e than 45 passenEcra were h ured as the flames swept nn ovs crowded coach. Good Evening! Members of the Community Home board, encouraged by the contribu- tion of by Mr. and Mrs. Bruno Schulz for retirement of the home's elevator debt, now talking of thp possibility of. extending the elevator to the third floor City golfers learning where they can find an able "prcsider at the refreshment board" as Pat Foticheanx did the honors at a buffet supper given by "Gilly" nnd Jewel Gilehriest Sun- day Pnl specializes in serv- ing olives If. (i. Beach host to Mr. nncl Mrs. A. Dowoociy. the! son Paul and his wife ami two hoys, all of whom reside al Frank- lin, Pn. Mrs. JE. S. Dlxon ap- pointed chairman of drama and pageantry for the Fourth district of the Texas Federation of Wom- en's clubs Pat Hilton, enlei talnine as her house truest Ruth Ann Morton of Tulsa, Olda.. who's been a close friend since kinder- :arten davs Kiwanis club mem- of Pinedale, Wyo ,K' f .the Phvsiclan said thp twins, united 'h DelVL' a 12 "funds. Tour ounces They bers wondering what the Rev. John Wright will have to report about Ins trip to Denmark when he gives them "The Big Picture" at their tegular Wednesday meeting Nellie Tiller hoping friends will call to see her at the home of Way no and Bosina BnUer, 3040 llth street, where she Is recovering rom an operation "Iho" Wnt- writing Gulf Oil friends here his vacation in New Orleans whore he is spendlnc a few days nrlor to sailing for Europe when! no will visit an uncle Frank (Blue Boy) EaglcMin breaking In hm replacement. Billy Whitman, nrior to his departure Saturday for Texas A. and M. Mrs. Belty Carroll Hooper to receive a BS de- ETPO in chemistry at Texas State College for Women this week. JN Schedules Final Debate on Arms Cut (Companion Slory, I'IIEO 12.) LAKE SUCCESS, Aug. 25 unllcd Nntlons for R-lobal arms reduction, Ihwnrlorl by RUII- nlfin-Ainai'lcnn cllfOronro.i am overshadowed bv the turmoil ove Greece. Indonesia and the veto, come up for debate today in a last- ditch effort to make some progress before the fall meeting of the 55- nnlion general assembly. The security council has accom- plished virtually nothing in the in- tervening year slnco the Soviot Un- ion mnde its surni'lsn nronosnl for arms slashing in tho 1946 assembly j-he problem now rests with the council's 11-nation commission on conventional armaments, which wns called to meet today. Dallas Hearing on Living Costs Set DALLAS, Aujr. 25 of-Iiving hearings be held in Dallas, starting Nov. 5. Members of the joint committee for the Dal- las hearing; are Rep, George Ben- der Sena. Joseph H. Ball James P. Kem (R- John J. Spaikman (D.-Ala.) and Reps. Henry O. Talle (R.-Ia nnd Walter B. Hubcr The grouti will stn'y in Dallas two 01' throe days and make a "full and complete study nnd Investiga- tion of the present high prices of consumer goods. A report lo Con- gress will be made not later Feb. 1, 1948." than after a. m. today, amounted to 2.GO inches at noon, Meteorolo- gist E. W. Ton-enco reported. "These squalls aro all of Ihe storm Port Arthur will the Venlhermnn said The State Highway dcjpnrtmenl office here announced at mid- morning that the Bolivar ferry was resuming operations and that all debris on Highway 87 to Galveslon was expected lo bn removed by noon today, re-opening this route. The ferry was closed Saturday at midnight. Fire .Destroys Cafe Few ill effe'ebTfrom a" 55-mile- an-hour blow were reported from the beach colonies at Gilchrist and Caplan, although prior to the storm one of the area's more imposing business establishments, Neva's cafe at Gilchrist, was destroyed by fire. The cafe, built only six months ago, was completely destroyed eaily Sunday morning by fire of undetermined origin. The building and were valued at according to Jnrk Storm, (Turn to Pago 8, Col. Hearing on Budget Is Slated Tuesday The first public hearing on the city budget for the fiscal year 1947- 48 will be belci Tuesday nt 10 a. m when c-lly commission inecU In reg- ular session, City Manager Cooper said today. Bnv'eniH's Neil Kstlmatrd The propound budget culls for WO.OOO In Ki'iim-nl fniiil Mjeimiull- lurnn, Ihn In tfiry. AllhriiiKh no cislliinil km of 1'ovnnun.s ban bium .suliinlllc-cl, Coon cr Hint eel that bo expected tbeso revenues lo .sIlKhlly oxcnfrt nonsns, Jtn Miilrl lo hnvo Ihn oomplolii budnc-1 roncly foi tho Tuesday hearing. Ho also submitted estimated ex- pendittire.s of for the water department, for the general interest nnd sinking fund, and 768.67 for the soawnll interest, and Two-Thirds of Defense Treaty Written, Report Compromise Offered By Venezuela Gets Argentine-U. S. OK By Philip Clarke PETROPOL1S, Brazil, Aug 25 A big hurdle at th Inter-Amrican Defense confer ence was believed cleared to day with Argentine agreemcn that all American nations miKl act to stop an attack of any on upon another. The 20-nation conference hr been siltine since 15 to dra up a treaty of mutual defense fo the Western hemisphere. Inforn ed sources said Sunday niKht twc thirds of the treaty had bee agreed upon Insisted on Joint Sanctions Argentina had insisted that join as a breakoff o trade and diplomatic relations nn military be rnllc into play only In case an America nation was attacked from outsid the hemisphere. She had arjrued' that in event aggression from within the horn isphere, steps to stop the aceres sion should be limited to consulta tion among- the American republics Sunday night, however, she con sontod to "application of collcctlv means" to slop Inlra-hcmispher attacks, but "only after such step are resolved bv consultations." Her consent was given in rep] to a compromise plan proposed b Venezuela. A source reported high that oonforonci the Unltec States-also had accepted the com promise formula and said "tin problem now is adequately settled.1 '...From Any Source" and most other delega tions had held out for ioint action in event of .aggression against an- treaty signatory from any source. A five-nation subcommittee to 'day neared agreement on an Ameri can "security territor to be subject to ioint defense. sinking fund. Total expenditures rmnce clcpnrlmpnl for the fi- nrrcnsod ..o Inrgo.st .sum nf which Is Ihn Inclusion of for (he rnntlnfrnnt fund, the bv npiu-oxlninlolv the Ii first time this Item ha In the burlijpl. AVIII c.1'.'1" in the s appeared npproxlnialolv pollen clepnrtmerit ri budget was necessary to take care p. salary raises, which will also be granted to nil other city em- ployes. In addition to grimt'inff wage increases to firemen, the city will grant to their pension fund, and this item, too, appears in Ihe budget for the first time. Ford Hikes Prices Per Unit Balkan Showdown Hinted This Week WASHINGTON, AUK. 25 United Stales ofliclals todny anxi- ously developments along tho Greek border In the anticipa- tion that there may be a showdown of Russian intentions in the Bal- kans (his week. Prom now until the United Nations general assem- bly meets in New York on Sept. 15 is regarded generally as the critical time for tho involved area. Frnnltly, officials feel no groat nwnirnnno over tho situation other I linn that heavy shipments of nkl to OI-PCOP In Ihe form of milltnry ii nd trniiHporl, omilpmont mny nlnvi  hold here Tuesday aflei- noon a I 3 o'clock. Pistol Packer Gun-toting purso for pretty po- licewomen Is now standard equip- ment on Detroit force. Marjorie Fleming makes aiilrU draw. Woman Seriously Hurt in Accident Car Overturns in Ditch After Intersection Crash Mrs. Homer T. Whitson, 1001 Washington boulevard. Groves, was in a "vcrv serious condition" to- dav at St. Mary's hospital follow- ing an automobile accident Sunday iibout n. m. in which her hus- autforcd lessor ipiuries, rela- tives said. Is Employe of Gulf The extent of Mrs. Whitson's in- uries had not been determined to- day at noon. An employe of the Gulf refinery for 26 years, she is currently serving as head telephone operator. Mr. Whitson, an accountant at he refinery, suffered many bruises and cuts, friends said, and remain- ed in the hospital today. The car in which the Whitson's vere returning home from church in R. ditch fol- with another automobile at the intersection of 39th street and Twin City highway, iccording to unolficinl reports. Botli Thrown from Our Both were thrown' from the car nd landed In tho ditch In about wo feet of water, reports snid. A near-by resident heard the crash. an to the scene and held Mrs. Whitson's head above water until services overturned owing a collision Soviets Accused By U. S. Official For Statements General Says Russia Is Defending Groups Hostile to America By Stanley Rich SEOUL. Aug. 25 An American-Soviet word bat- :Ie mounted to a drumfire clip :pday when Maj. Gen. Albert Brown charged the Russians with defending -political ETCUBS in South Korea which were disloyal :o the government and hostile to the United States. A broadside by Brown before tha ioint commission followed closely a statement by Lt. Gen. John R. Hodjre accusing the Soviets of sup- porting North Korean leaders -v of "seditious activities aimed at the destruction of the constituted trovernment. and law and order in the American zone." Commission Bogged Oown odge is U. S. commander in Korea and Brown is chief of ths American delegation on the ioint lomraission which is boseed down n its efforts to devise a provision- al government for Korea, Brown accused the Soviets of rving to usurp tha functions of the loint commission, abusing their meat status in tho U. S zono bv gnorlng the dictates of common courtesy, raising indlscriminats charges for propaganda purposes, and throwing up a smoke screen to hide certain strategic blunders by the Soviet delegation. Brown's statement was in reply o one bv Col. Gen. T. F. Shtikov. chief of the Russian deleeation, ast wack accusing the Americans 3f carrying out democratic elements in South Ko- rea. Brown said Shtikov. in releasing his statement without consulting tho American delegation wits "at- tempting to USUI-D the. function of the ioint commission" bv an action which properly n------- The- Soviet delegation overlooks the-fact-that while in south Korea it actually is the gest of the south Korean government and of the United Brown's statement said, "and should follow the nor- mal dictates of common courtesy in conducting its business" Charges Are '.Pure Fantasy" He described as "pure the prior Soviet charges that Amer- ican arrests In Korea were mada to create conditions which would undermine the work of the joint commission. "Tho Soviet delegation Is bring- ing these charges for purposes of pure propaganda and creating n. smoke screen to obscure certain strategic blunders of the Soviet Brown charged. "These blunders have placed ths Soviet delegation, through its in- could have been, agreement Shcriff's office authorities whi nvestijratcd the accident were un ivailablc for reports on details o ho collision. and Sikhs Raiding in Punjab irllrr Story on Pago 12) niCLin, AUR. 2f> V vlrluiil nf wnr wns report nd irlay on I ho Punjnli froiHIor vvoon PnUl.stiin and Jndln wltl olh Moslem.-! nnd Sikhs ravaging ie countryside in spreading mill iry maneuvers. Most communi ations with the region were seV' red. The worst trouble spot was said i be the region halfway between ,nhoro and Amrilsnr on the Pakis '.n-lndla frontier. Armed Moslem bands woro attacking Sikl nd Hindu villages inside India ome 12 to 15 villages were report- d to have been evacuated as a re- ill of (ho Moslem attacks. Viests Attacked By Mob in Trieste ROME, Aug. 25 Italian ws agency dispatch from Trieste oday said a mob in the Yugoslai one of Venezia-Giulia inflicted rave injuries Sunday on a Vati- in prelate sent to confirm chil- ron in Ihe area, and killed a Icca who tried to defend him. The agoncy. Ansa, said the pre- ilo. Msgr. Giacomo Ukmar, was to n Flumo hospital suffer- ig from a skull fracture and sori- is knife wounds in tho region f the kidneys. It sold the Rev. iro Buloisch tried to guard Msgr. kmar and was cut so seriously died nlmo.nl Immodlntoly. College Building Amendment Is Holding Slim Lead; Regan, Thompson Win Races 4 Die in Train Wreck PARIS, Aug. 25 -Tho French agency reportorl tatlav that four persons were klllnrl and 23 In- Ill rod ncn: whon I wo Monlprllier trains collided Franco Sunday night. in southern LONG CHUTE DROP MOSCOW Aug. 25 Vladimu-skayn, enainpcr in the Mos- cow Mechanical Institutp. was re- norted today to have fallen measles. 4; pneumonia. 1; syphilis, feet before openine her parachute and whoODinz is. 'i.-i inmn icincn in a jump from feet. (By Aasoclaled rrrs.i> The hotly-contested college build- ing amendment to the state consti- tution was approved by Texas voters in Saturday's special elec- tion, which also saw two new Con- gressmen nampd. Ilpgnn, ThnnipNon Win The new Congressmen arc Ken Rogan, Midland oil mnn, and Clnrk W. Thompson, Galveston busincss- nn. Rclurns from 211 counties. -10 complete, in tho college building amendment votp. showed Sg.flfiS votes in favor of Ihe plan, and 949 against. Tho favorable vote was approximately 54.5 per cent of the 182.917 counted up to a. m. In the Congressional race in the 16th district Regan held a slim j 405-vote margin over vouncr Wood- row Wilson Bean. With 19 out of 10 counties reported. 15 of them complete, Resran polled 7086 votes lo Bean's GSM. The election was for the uncxpired term of Rpp. R. Ewlng Thomason, who resigned to bcconip a federal judge'. Thompson Bent's Sulak Thompson, former Congressman nnd veteran of both wars, led Loulu J. Kulak, LnGnuigp, by almost fiDOO votes at the Intcst Texas election bureau tabulation (15 counties out of 15 3 Ho polled 15.201 to Sulak's 10.667. Only seven boxes remained out at a. m. today. The election was to fill the vacancy in the ninth dis- trict caused by (he death of Rep Joseph J. Mansfield. organizations, in the position of repudiating the Molotov-Marshall agreement and holding up the worlc of the commission.1' Hodgn Is Hodge said he wn.i by tho RuBtilnn njwnrtlono and Inrtna ilium ft "propngnntln atata- Al. HID nan m lime tha Amer- ican military loader levulu-d n few chargoa of hlH own nnd flnlly stut- od thnt "conditions preventing tho of tho commission have been created" by the stand of the Russians. Weather Report (Dali from U. S. Weather Burns.) LOCAL FORECAST: Showery and mos'ly cloudy this afternoon. Partly cloudy tonight and Tuesday with .tcnttcred thtmdershowrrs Tucsdav. Max- imum tomperAlurc tills nftcrnoon K lowest tonlKht 76. highest Tuesday S3 14 00. Moderate lo fresh southerly this afternoon nnd moderate southerly tonight and Tuesday. East Texns: Considerable cloudiness. Iocs! '.liimdershowers, most In central portion this afternoon. Partly cloudy to- night and Tuesday with widely scattered thundershowers. Not quite so warm north portion Tuesday and in central portion (his afternoon. Moderate south- east and south winds, except fresh a! Umts on the extreme upper coast tha afternoon. Louisiana: Partly cloudy after- loon, tonight, and Tuesday, widely tered thundershowers Tucsdav cn-i west portion this afternoon Moderate southeast winds on the coast. COMPARATIVE DATA 1917 Maximum temperature 80 Minimum temperature 72 Rainfall i 37 93 79 HOURLY TEMPERATURES 70 4 a. m. 78 fi a, m___ 79 8 a. m.... 80 10 a. m..... 80 Noon .___ flO 2 n. m. tomorrow, 5 49. Sunset tomorrow. Barometric pressure, fl a. rn. today, 10.03 inches, 1016.0 millibars. 4 p. nl, 6 p. m. fl p. m. in p. m. Uidnlcht 2 n. m. Sunrise Sabine Tide Record for Tomorrow High tide, p. m. Low tide n. m.. p. m. Bolivar Rseord for Tomorrow- High tide, a. m Low tide, p. m. FISHING CONDITIONS AT JETTIES At noon today, the watc- a' vns calm nnd semi-clear un a llRhl wind from Uir AmarUlo Chlciido Chrlatt OBSERVATIONS 90 85 95 60 80 85 91 93 54 90 ort Arthur (airpor.) SO Worth Denver nlveston Touston rew" Orleans York an Antonio Tushinjton Mm. 7J 76 73 51 73 73 75 74 71 73 73 fft 3 1 JEWS PA PER I Si EW SPA PERI   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication