Wednesday, June 8, 2011

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - June 8, 2011, New Braunfels, Texas 6A ¡ Wednesday, June 8, 2011 | herald-zeitung.COM AT HOME itMRNRPr m For breaking news, sports and traffic follow us on Twitter ONewBraunfelaHZ Become a New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung Facebook fan atfacrtook.com Sign up for e-newsletter bv visrting the Herald-Zaiting online; harald-zaftung.com A ■Hi WINTER PROSAPIO Columnist Winter Prosapio writes from the front lines of motherhood D.C. and the Capitol squirrels This week is our big summer vacation and the first time in a long time we've left Texas. I really hate leaving Texas. People talk funny, have no plural form for you (as in y'all), and the salsa is darn similar to the stuff you dip your french fries into. But one has to get out of paradise once in a while. While we've had our share of "stay-cations," it was time to get out for a bit. We headed east. Way east, all the way to our nation's capital. We're a collection of monument geeks. Seriously, is there anything better than super large structures made of marble with history etched in every line? And there's marble everywhere. There's so much marble in Washington you can walk into a congressional office building and find even the walls between the stalls in the bathrooms are made of marble. As if that weren't enough there are the museums — specifically the Smithsoni-ans. The Smithsonians make the Internet seem like an underachievement. Despite the impressive statuary, historical monuments, and enormous museums our single most memorable moment involved squirrels. Yes, in the city where the fate of the nation is regularly debated and laws governing everything from the content of our air to the fine print in our mortgage documents, it was the squirrels that left the biggest impression on our crew. Combine fajitas, Lone Star beer By Laura Lopax Food columnist Dear Laura: Like your brew recipes—Do you have one for fajitas? — john Dear John: This is a dated recipe from Lone Star Brewing Co. — Enjoy — I have marinated fo hours. for 4 Lone Star Fajitas Soy sauce Garlic powder Onion salt Coarse ground pepper 1 cup Italian salad dressing 1 cup Lone Star Beer 5 pounds fajitas (skirt steak) Sprinkle meat generously with soy sauce. Cover on both sides with layer of garlic powder, onion salt and pepper. Knead spices into meat. Mix dressing and beer; cover meat and marinate in mixture two hours or more. Put over hot coals. Serve in fresh flour tortillas spread with a thick layer of mashed avocados. Add hot sauce (Pico de Gallo—fine cut tomatoes, jalapeno peppers and onion.) Serve with cold Lone Star Beer. • • • • • Dear Laura: Another request for a recipe for watermelon—Candance. Watermelon—Blueberry Layered Salad 2 cups cubed watermelon 2 cups unpeeled sliced red apples 1 pint blueberries 1 tbsp. lemon juice 1/3 cup honey 1/4 cup fresh mint cup frozen non-dairy whipped topping, thawed, Cool Whip 1 tbsp. lemon zest 1. In each of eight glasses, layer watermelon, apples, and blueberries. 2. In a small bowl, combine lemon juice, honey and mint. Spoon evenly over fruit. Top with whipped topping. Sprinkle with lemon zest. Sandra Lee P.S. Fourth of July colors Dear Laura: I have eaten corn on the cob at several LAURA McKENZIE | Herald-Zeitung Lone Star Fajitas combine the Mexican classic and native Texas brew to give a whole new flavor that's sure to please. f Savory White Cheddar Muffins LAURA LOPEZ Columnist Laura Lopez writes about food and cooking. Contact her at lrlopez72@yahoo.com locations, but I enjoyed the chili and cheese version. Please help. I do not want to use a lot of chili. Betty Dear Betty: You do not have to use the chili powder; use hot sauce instead or don't use it at all. Leave out the heat! Mexican-Style Street Com (Better Homes & Gardens) Cotija (ko-tee-hah), a popular Mexican cheese, can be served grated or crumbled. If you can't find it, try Parmesan cheese in its place. 4 fresh ears of corn 1 tbsp. vegetable oil 1/2 cup mayonnaise 1 clove garlic 1/4 to 1/2 tsp. paprika 1/4 tsp bottled hot pepper sauce Bake: 25-30 minutes Oven: 350 degrees 1/3 cup butter 1/4 cup chopped chives 1 tsp. minced garlic 1 3/4 cups whole buttermilk 3 cups all-purpose baking mix 11/2 cups shredded sharp white cheddar cheese 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray 16 muffin cups with non-stick spray. 2. In a small saucepan, melt butter over medium heat. Add chives and garlic and cook for two minutes. Whisk in buttermilk. 3. In a medium bowl, combine baking mix and cheese. Add buttermilk mixture, stirring just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon batter into prepared muffin cups. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes or until golden brown. Cool in pans for five minutes. (optional) 4 ounces Cotija, Parmesan, or aged cheddar * cheese, grated Bottled hot pepper sauce (optional) 1. Peel back cornhusks but do not remove. Rinse corn and scrub with a stiff brush to remove silks. Brush corn with oil. Fold husks back around corn and tie with 100-percent cotton kitchen string. 2. For a charcoal grill, grill corn on the rack of an uncovered grill directly over medium coals for 20 to 25 minutes or until corn is tender, turning and rearranging ears occasionally. (For a gas grill, preheat grill. Reduce heat to medium. Place corn on grill rack over heat. Cover and grill as above.) 3. Meanwhile, in a shallow dish or pie plate, combine mayonnaise, garlic, paprika, and, if desired, the 1/4 teaspoon hot pepper sauce. Place cheese in another shallow dish or pie plate. 4. To serve, spread corn with mayonnaise mixture, then sprinkle with cheese to coat. If desired, serve with additional hot pepper sauce. Makes 4 servings. * Tip: Use a cheddar cheese that is aged so it is crumbly and dry when grated. ONLINE: MORE RECIPES Visit herald-zeitung.com for hundreds of more recipes. HZ Take guacamole to a whole new level: Sea level First off, the squirrels in the park by the Capitol ran right up to us, immediately looking for a hand out. It was disconcerting, if not ironic. Then they ran in little bands after Mireya who they identified as their leader, or at least as the individual most likely to drop snack food. As we neared the capi-tol, we saw exactly what living within a stones through of the nation's capi-tol does to the mental state of squirrels. Two squirrels were having an impressive chase around benches and over grass. Suddenly, they both ran a good 20 feet up a tree, had a mid-air tussle reminiscent of the coyote and road-runner cartoons, and fell to the ground, dropping their prize. Sierra screamed in horror. We were all stunned. There it lay. Pizza crust. I tell you what, if you're all of eight ounces and are willing to drop 20 feet for a piece of stale pizza crust, you've got some serious priority issues. It's been a good vacation, but I for one will be happy to get back home where the squirrels stick to taunting dogs and the salsa doesn't taste like ketchup. The Associated Press Classic guacamole already is amazing. Add heaps of marinated crab-meat and shrimp or lobster (or be crazy and use both), and now you have a bowl of comfort truly worthy of being served to Dad with a mound of tortilla chips on Father's Day. This recipe from Roberto Santibanez' "Truly Mexican," can be prepared and refrigerated up to an hour in advance, but let it warm at room temperature a bit before serving. The flavors will be much better. (Recipe from Roberto Santibanez' "Truly Mexican/'Wiley 2011) Seafood Guacamole Start to finish. 35 minutes Makes about 31/2 cups For the seafood: 4 ounces jumbo lump crabmeat, picked over for shells 3 ounces cooked shrimp or lobster, cut into small pieces (1/2 cup) 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro 1 tablespoon minced jalapeno or serrano chili, including seeds, more or less to taste 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 teaspoons minced canned chipo-tles in adobo, including sauce 1/4 teaspoon fine salt or 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt For the guacamole: 2 tablespoons finely chopped white onion 1 tablespoon minced jalapeno or serrano chili, including seeds, more or less to taste 1/4 teaspoon fine salt or 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro, divided 1 large or 2 small ripe Hass avocados, halved and pitted Splash of lime juice In a large bowl, mix together tne crabmeat, shrimp or lobster, orange juice, cilantro, chili, olive oil, chipotle and salt. Let the mixture marinate for about 20 minutes. Meanwhile, prepare the guacamole. On a large cutting board, mince and mash together the onion, chili, salt and half of the cilantro. Transfer to a bowl. Use a knife to score the flesh of the avocado halves in a crosshatch pattern, then scoop out with a spoon and add to the bowl. Toss well, then mash. Season with lime juice and additional chili and salt. With a slotted spoon, transfer about half of the seafood mixture into the guacamole, then stir. Season to taste with additional salt, then garnish with the remaining seafood mixture and the reserved cilantro. The seafood mixture and the guacamole (with a piece of plastic wrap pressed against the surface) can be stored separately in the refrigerator for up to an hour. Let the guacamole come to room temperature and let the seafood mixture stand at room temperature just long enough to take some of the chill off before you assemble and serve. Good beer calls for good nuts, so roast your own Qu    | nrArm By RmCMM LOCKS For The Associated Press Protein-rich and rtable, nuts have always een the utility players of the snack world — good for that mid-afternoon energy dip, but generally not the kind of thing to make the crowd go wild. But with manufacturers introducing spiced up versions of old favorites — Yes, we are talking jalapeno flavored pistachios here — nuts are breaking out of their shell. "People are going after something new and exciting that helps to wake up your senses," says Kay Logsdon, editor-in-chief of The Food Channel, which put nuts at No. 4 on its 2010 Top 10 snack trends list. What's new in nuts? In addition to spicier versions, like zesty chili peanuts, you'll find nuts appearing with new partners, such as caramelized black walnuts with dark chocolate. Nuts also have benefited from the quest for healthier foods. "People are looking for that whole 'health halo'," says Logsdon. Nuts are relatively high in fat, so you need to keep an eye on portion size to stay in the healthy zone. But the majority of the fats are monounsaturated and polyunsaturated, so-called "good" fats. Meanwhile, nuts can be a source of vitamins, protein and fiber, more than you can say for many snacks. Citrus Herb Pistachios Start to finish: 15 minutes Makes 4 cups 1 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon sugar Zest of half a lemon Zest of half an orange 1 tablespoon minced fresh rosemary 1 tablespoon minced fresh thyme 4 cups unsalted pistachio meats (no shells) 3 tablespoons butter, meltad Heat the oven to 350 F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Using a mortar and pestle or a spice grinder, grind together the salt, sugar, both zests, and the rosemary and thyme. Place the pistachios in a medium bowl. Drizzle the butter over the pistachios, then toss to coat. Sprinkle the citrus-herb seasoning mix over the pistachios, then mix until evenly coated. Spread the pistachios in an even layer over the prepared baking sheet. Roast for 10 to 12 minutes. Serve warm or allow to cool and transfer to an airtight container. Nutrition information per 1/4 cup serving (values are rounded to tne nearest whole number): 199 calories; 147 calories from fat (74 percent of total calories); 16 g fat (3 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 6 mg cholesterol; 10 g carbohydrate; 7 g protein; 3 g fiber; 121 mg sodium. (Recipe from Alison Lad-man)

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