Sunday, May 22, 2011

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Page: 1

Other pages in this edition:

Who (or what) are you looking for?

Find old articles about anyone, in the World’s Largest Newspaper Archive!

Other Newspapers from New Braunfels, Texas

Loading...

Other Editions from Sunday, May 22, 2011

Loading...

Text Content of Page 1 of New Braunfels Herald Zeitung on Sunday, May 22, 2011

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - May 22, 2011, New Braunfels, Texas ( ft tty irtfn/rt/tf t/.i . .| Ä, II#*« REVENUE Programs « $1,566,510 - 79% W Management = $334,927 » 17% Thrift Store Expenses = $31,204 - 3% ■ Fundraising Events = $31,204 = 1% TOTAL - $1,988,709 Texas Education Agency * $705,910 = 35% School District Contracts * $643,750 “ 32% ■ Foundation Grants * $188,492 « 10% ■ Fundraising Events = $174,247 - 9% 1» Donations = $91,867 = 5% M United Way - $73,323 = 4% Thrift Store Sales * $64,275 m 3% ■ Other Contracts ■ $49,021 * 2% ■ Other - $937 - .1% TOTAL - $1,991,822 EXPENSES ▼ W SUNDAY MAY 22, 2011 Herald-Zeitung Serving New Braunfels and Comal County since 1852. $1.50 LOCAL AGENCY CAUGHT IN BUDGET CROSSFIRE CIS faces uncertain fate Communities in Schools got $59IK from ► NEW BRAUNFELS COUNCIL Pospisil, Miranda will be NBISD, CISD sworn in By Greg Bowen The Herald-Zeitung Newly elected Mayor Gale Pospisil and city councilor Bryan Miranda will be sworn in and begin their three-year terms on Monday. Among the issues Pospisil N™ BRAUNFELS and Miranda CIYYCOUNC , .    .    When:    5:45    p.m.    Monday -and their whera: Citv Hall, six colleagues 424 §. Castell Ave on New Braunfels City Council — will immediately begin to wrestle with are whether to allow a new tuber’s entrance to the Comal River and whether to approve new recommendations for downtown parking. Tuber entrance Comal River Toobs is seeking a required special-use permit to open a tuber entrance and exit at 444 San Antonio St., across the Comal from Schlitterbahn. The tube rental and shuttle company says the new tuber entry could relieve some tuber congestion at the Prince Solms Park tuber entrance upriver, and give tubers the opportunity to enter the river below the T\ibe Chute and Stinky Falls, which can be potentially unsafe. It is the first request for a permit for a new tuber entrance since the permit requirement was instituted in 2006. Downtown parking The Downtown Development Board and Main Street Advisory Board are asking council to consider recommendations regarding downtown parking. Recommendations include erecting signs pointing the way to parking, enforcing two-hour parking, removing two-hour parking from certain areas, creating a residential parking permit program, acquiring additional parking areas, and installing parking meters in high-parking demand areas. Other action Council on Monday also will: • Canvass the vote in the May 14 city elections. • Consider resolutions recognizing outgoing Mayor Bruce Boyer and Mayor Pro Tern Kathleen Krueger. See COUNCIL, Page 6A ■ SPORTS, 18 Smithson Valley sweeps, advances ■ THE STATE, 3A Redistricting maps OKd Hffii [$644 1 VfiMAn ■ SPECIAL SECTION A look at the Class of 2011 By Will Wright The Herald-Zeitung See FUNDING, Page 6A small army invaded New Braunfels Independent School District’s Board of Trustees meeting last Tliesday night. The citizens came from all walks of life, eager to ask the board to preserve NBISD funding for Communities In Schools, r-^I CIS serves 28 schools in four Ilf Hi st * U)oi distric ts. helping mentor, tutor and provide moral support for _ those children who Douglas otherwise might drop out of school. However, these are the realities. The state is coping with a projected $27 billion budget shortfall. School districts stand to lose at least $4 billion in funding next year, and even more the following year. NBISD is trying to plug gaps in preparing for an $8.4 million deficit in 2011-12; Comal ISD is doing the same in the face of an $11.1 million hole. Because the state hasn’t set its funding, and CIS doesn’t know what to expect. Neither do the school districts, who must set their budgets during the summer. Superintendents and school boards from both Comal County school districts list keeping teachers and maintaining academic standards as their top priorities — which has CIS facing a double whammy. CIS was created here 19 years ago to establish many services that school districts now provide. Faced with the realities of losing the $591,000 it received from both districts this year, CIS is ramping up its efforts to make sure it won’t be completely cut out of the picture. “Currently, we spend $26,523 for each campus for a full-time staff person," CIS executive director Christine Douglas said. “Our goal is now to reduce the cost to the school district for LAURA McKENZIE/Herald-Zeitung Communities in Schools graduate Bradley Knight rolls out cookie dough in the kitchen at 2tarts Bakery on Friday. CIS continues to be involved with Knight, who graduated from New Braunfels High School last year, as he pursues a future in culinary arts at Texas State Technics I College in Waco. Without money from local districts, 19 full-time CIS positions in jeopardy Herald-Zeitung graphic By Will Wright The Herald-Zeitung If it loses the $591,000 it received from the Comal and New Braunfels school districts in 2010-11, Communities In Schools won’t be able to fund the 19 full-time staffers it has at 22 schools in both districts. “At this point, we have notified all of our campus employees that unless a school district intends to keep CIS, all of their jobs will be terminated as of July 31,” director Chris Douglas said. “Some of them have served for years.... These aren’t brand-new people; they have dedicated themselves to serving the children and their families.” See MONEY, Page 6A CIS COVERAGE ■ OUR VIEW: Communities in Schools provides a valuable dropout prevention service to the students of Comal County and the local districts. Area philanthropists and our state legislators need to take whatever steps are necessary to ensure this program weathers the economic storm and stays in our schools. 4A ■ Almost 3,000 students were helped last year by the South Central Texas Chapter of Communities In Schools. 7A ■ Communities In Schools will host its Project Success Honors Banquet at 6 p.m. Monday. 7A 158, No. 165 , 4 sections Inside CLASSIFIEDS COMICS CROSSWORD FORUM OBITUARIES PLANNER SPORTS * r- CLICK 1D tc sc Wt 3A 2C IB um High Low 97 73 Dftaitf 10A 56825 n oooo? $1.50 Boyer leaves with praise—and infrastructure legacy By Greg Bowen The Herald-Zeitung When Mayor Bruce Boyer hands over his gavel on Monday, it’ll be with the thanks of a grateful city ringing in his ears. His years of service have been marked by exemplary dedication to the best interests of the community. So reads the official City of New Braunfels Resolution to be presented to Boyer on Monday, during his last of six years' worth of city council meetii His performance of the duties and responsibilities of mayor has been characterized by excellent and constructive contributions to municipal government in our city. Among those contributions are many infrastructure projects that, it could be said, make up Boyer’s most obvious legacy. There’s New Braunfels Civic/Convention Center—all 60,000 square feet of it — ,which officially opened in July 2008. Then there's the Walnut Avenue Reconstruction Project, which began last fall and, when finished, will have transformed the heavily-traveled Walnut from a too-narrow and pot-hole ridden mess into a wide and beautiful thoroughfare with left-turn lanes, landscaped medians and even pocket parks. Also on the list: the Church Hill Drainage Project, the South Tributary Drainage Project, See BOYER, Page 9A LAURA McKENZIE/Herald-Zeitung Mayor Bruce Boyer its 1 .....j ligi J 1 til Low rates mean ne to refinance. LOAN DEPT (830) 626 8627 WWSV,? IPSTSTATE-TEXaS.COí FDIC