New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, March 19, 2011

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

View full pageStart a free trial

Issue date:

Pages available: 20

Previous edition:

Next edition: - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions

About New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 318,726

Years available: 1952 - 2013

Learn more about this publication


  • 2.13+ billion articles and growing everyday!
  • More than 400 years of papers. From 1607 to today!
  • Articles covering 50 U.S.States + 22 other countries
  • Powerful, time saving search features!
Find your ancestors now
Start your Genealogy Search now
See with your own eyes the newspapers your great-great grandparents held.

View sample pages : New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, March 19, 2011

Get access to these newspapers Plus 2.13+ billion other articles

OCR Text

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - March 19, 2011, New Braunfels, Texas ■ SPORTS, 1B S5!"-!!AM Big Dance ends for JUd Aggies, Roadrunners ■ CLASSIFIEDS, 1C 65 GARAGE SALE LISTINGS SATURDAY, MARCH 19, 2011 Texas ApNewspaper of the YearZeitungServing New Braunfels and Comal County since 1852. 500 NBU urges water conservation 7« jj Dry weather, heavy use causing significant drop in Edwards Aquifer levels From staff reports The lack of significant rainfall and the increased use of water for landscaping has caused Edwards Aquifer levels to drop sharply in recent weeks. If the levels continue to drop at current rates, New Braunfels residents could be facing Stage I watering restrictions before month’s end, if not sooner. New Braunfels Utilities customers are being asked to conserve on water use to help reduce the impact on aquifer levels and avoid watering restrictions. “Since Monday, March 14, we have seen the aquifer levels fall by 1.6 feet to the current 665.1 feet,’’ said Gretchen Reuwer, NBU communications manager. “As spring and warmer weather approach, it is expected that more water will be used for landscaping as residents prepare their yards and gardens. “Considering that industry experts estimate that about 50 percent of residential water use is used for landscaping and other outdoor activities, this is certainly an area where significant conservation measures can be See WATER, Page 11A ► JAPAN AFTERMATH Burying reactors is not ‘realistic’ Experts say notion is desperate and could make things worse The Associated Press RELATED ■ Federal and state officials sought Friday to dispel fears of a wider danger from radioactivity spewing from Japan's crippled nuclear reactors. SA Why not just bury them? The idea of smothering and sealing Japan’s overheated nuclear reactors in sand or concrete to stop the crisis is appealing. But experts say that it’s too early for something that desperate and that it could be a big mistake that could make matters worse. Most urge continuing the current efforts to cool the radioactive material, and at least one suggested massive spraying to hold down radioactive dust. Fires, explosions or partial meltdowns have struck four of the six reactor units at the Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant. There are few options for stopping the dangerous overheating of nuclear materials there. Military fire trucks sprayed tons of water Friday, and workers hope to restart cooling systems once a new power line is installed. Reporters in Japan raised the notion Friday of sealing the reactors and fuel rods in concrete as an emergency See JAPAN, Page 11A ‘TIE A YELLOW RIBBON ROUND ...’ LAURA McKENZIE/Herald-Zeitung Sharon Suchy, left, helps park ranger Beverly Mancie hang a new yellow ribbon around a tree Friday at Main Plaza on Friday. Suchy hopes the ribbon will remind passersby to honor the troops serving overseas HONORING TROOPS Veteran’s mother wants to be sure American soldiers are remembered By Will Wright The Herald-Zeitung Sharon Suchy just wants folks to remember. The mother of an Iraq War veteran, she wants everyone to remember today is the eighth anniversary of the start of that conflict On the southside of the plaza in downtown New Braunfels sits a giant tree adorned with a giant yellow ribbon — and when passers by see it, Suchy wants them to think of the veterans serving abroad. “March 19, 2003 was the start of the conflict in Iraq, and I just thought (about) the timing,” she said. “I just wanted to call attention to the ribbon, in case people haven’t noticed.” As of Thursday, the U.S. Department of Defense reported 4,421 Americans died during Operation Iraqi Freedom, with another 31,938 wounded during the war of liberation and subsequent occupation. The DOD reports another 1,495 deaths and 10,622 wounded during Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan, a war that continues today. Suchy’s son, David Williams, a 1987 Canyon High graduate, was a specialist in the U.S. Army’s 1st Armored See TROOPS, Page 11A closed By Will Wright The Herald-Zeitung A major accident shortly after 6 p.m. Friday tied up traffic for an hour in the northbound lane of 1-35 north of New Braunfels. Details were sketchy late Friday. New Braunfels Police Sgt. Tim Brinkkoeter said NBPD officers diverted traffic from the highway onto the access road south of the accident, which occurred near mile marker 194 between the Kohlenberg Road and Watson Lane exits. Brinkkoeter said northbound traffic was snarled only for a short time, and the northbound lanes were reopened between 7:15 and 7:30 p.m. He said the Department of Public Safety was in charge of the investigating the wreck. Injuries were involved, and a helicopter was dispatched to the scene. Comal County Sheriffs Office Lt. Mark Reynolds could not provide details. Reynolds said he had spoken with a DPS trooper working the scene. Calls placed to the trooper through the agency’s San Antonio office were not immediately returned. ► UNREST IN LIBYA Cease-fire declared The Associated Press TRIPOLI, Libya — Trying to outmaneuver Western military intervention, Moammar Gad-hafi’s government declared a cease-fire on Friday against the rebel uprising faltering against his artillery, tanks and warplanes. In Washington, President Barack Obama ruled out the use of American ground troops but warned the U.S., which has an array of naval and air forces in the region, would join in military action. There should be no doubt about the Libyan leaders intentions “because he has made them clear,” Obama said. “Just yesterday, speaking of the city of Benghazi, a city of roughly 700,000, he threatened ‘we will have no mercy and no pity.’ No mercy on his own citizens.” Vol. 158, No. 110 20 pages, 3 sections Inside CLASSIFIEDS 1C COMICS 3B CROSSWORD 3B FORUM 4A OBITUARIES 3A PLANNER 9A SPORTS IB TV GRID 3C A few clouds High Low 84 64 Details 10A e '"56825 00001    1 50 cents St. Jude’s Ranch program gives pregnant teens parenting skills LAURA McKENZIE/Herald-Zeitung St. Jude's Ranch for Children staff member Sylvia Leal holds Chantel during the ground-breaking ceremony for the Pregnant and Parenting Teen Program expansion. By J. Louise Larson The Herald-Zeitung When Bryanna was homeless, pregnant and sleeping in the alleys of Pleasanton at age 16, the prospect of a roof, an education and a safe place to learn to parent seemed distant and impossible. “In Pleasanton, I didn’t know how to get back to a safe place,” she recalled in an interview Monday. Now 18, a resident at St. Jude’s Ranch for Children, the mother of an energetic toddler is finishing her high school education on time — and for the first time in a long time, she feels safe. “I’ve slept on the streets before,” she said, recalling the alleys of Pleasanton, where she shared the streets with prostitutes, who were nice to her but whose clients sometimes mistook her for a “working girl.’' “That was scary,” she said. Pregnant at 16, she had her baby by C-section at 17. See RANCH, Page 11A ;